The Game of Bullying Prevention

Doctoral student Geoff Marietta, Ed.M.’13, and Jeff Orkin — cofounders of Giant Otter Technologies, Inc. — worked together to create SchoolLife, an antibullying video game. We take a closer look at this winner of the Harvard Education Innovation Contest, the MIT iGame Entrepreneurial Competition, and a National Science Foundation grant. (via The Game of Bullying Prevention | Harvard Graduate School of Education)

Despite high enrolment rates, many children in the region of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/CIS), are missing out on education.

According to the latest study published by the Out-of-School Children Initiative, 2.5 million children of basic school age and 1.6 million children of pre-primary school age are missing out on school due to a serious shortage of services and facilities.

Children in poor regions and rural areas, children with the lowest socioeconomic backgrounds, working children and children in conflict with the law often benefit least from education. Additionally, many more children from the most marginalized communities are excluded from national data collection procedures and thus are invisible.

(via Including all children in quality learning – new report on Out-of-School Children | Back on Track)

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory
The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.
The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.
“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.
The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.
The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.
(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory

The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.

The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.

“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.

The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.

The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.

(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

World Inequality Database on Education The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.
(via DME WIDE • World Inequality Database on Education)

World Inequality Database on Education

The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.

(via DME WIDE • World Inequality Database on Education)

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum
Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.
Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.
“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.
via Taipei Times

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum

Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.

Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.

“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.

via Taipei Times

The Greek secondary teachers union OLME is on strike again today against cuts, which have seen 2500 teachers suspended from their jobs. Some have been reassigned to new duties, often inappropriate for their training and experience, many will lose their jobs altogether. (via Greek Teachers strike Today | Teacher Solidarity)

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation
A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation

A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.
Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.
The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.
(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.

Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.

The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.

(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.
The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.
(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.

The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.

(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)