It is hard for pupils in poor rural Ugandan schools to pursue their dreams, but it is harder still for those in community schools such as Amorikot. At the start of the Katine project, Amorikot was about the poorest school you could find – a collection of leaky, gaping, grass huts for classrooms, and offices manned largely by unqualified teachers. But, as part of the project, Amref built modern classrooms and latrines. Yet because it is a community – as opposed to a government-aided – school, Amorikot has struggled without trained teachers or state grants, and with dwindling fee payments from parents. (via Education in Katine | Richard M Kavuma | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

It is hard for pupils in poor rural Ugandan schools to pursue their dreams, but it is harder still for those in community schools such as Amorikot. At the start of the Katine project, Amorikot was about the poorest school you could find – a collection of leaky, gaping, grass huts for classrooms, and offices manned largely by unqualified teachers. But, as part of the project, Amref built modern classrooms and latrines. Yet because it is a community – as opposed to a government-aided – school, Amorikot has struggled without trained teachers or state grants, and with dwindling fee payments from parents. (via Education in Katine | Richard M Kavuma | Global development | guardian.co.uk)