Posts tagged Africa

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to more than half of the world’s out-of-school children: 22% of children of primary school age in sub-Saharan Africa have either never attended school, or left before completing.
The EFA Global Monitoring Report and the UNESCO Institute of Statistics released new data this week showing that the number of children out of school in sub-Saharan Africa has remained at about 30 million over the last five years, of which 16 million are girls. This stalling of progress is partly because there is unfulfilled demand as the region’s school-age population is increasing. It’s not all bad news, however: some countries are making significant progress towards universal primary education. (via Spotlight on Africa: who’s going to school? | World Education Blog)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to more than half of the world’s out-of-school children: 22% of children of primary school age in sub-Saharan Africa have either never attended school, or left before completing.

The EFA Global Monitoring Report and the UNESCO Institute of Statistics released new data this week showing that the number of children out of school in sub-Saharan Africa has remained at about 30 million over the last five years, of which 16 million are girls. This stalling of progress is partly because there is unfulfilled demand as the region’s school-age population is increasing. It’s not all bad news, however: some countries are making significant progress towards universal primary education. (via Spotlight on Africa: who’s going to school? | World Education Blog)

Improving Education in Uganda

Determined to improve an educational system beset by challenges, advocates recently launched Uganda’s first Quality Public Education Week. Talk shows, panel debates, exhibitions and rallies were held throughout the country April 22-26, 2013—a call for action from Ugandan decision-makers.

While public schools are available at no charge to Ugandan boys and girls ages 6 through 12, experts question the facilities’ quality and effectiveness. As youngsters age, drop out rates soar - as many as 66 percent leave, according to SC. An alarming 18 percent of those eligible do not attend school at all.


23 April 2013 – Calling for quick action by authorities in the Central African Republic (CAR), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) today warned that education was becoming another casualty of the months-long conflict, with half the country’s schools shuttered and hundreds of thousands of students at risk of missing out the entire year.
At least 250,000 children who started the 2012-2013 primary school year, and 30,000 who were in secondary school at the start of the crisis, could lose the entire school year if schools do not re-open in the coming weeks, the agency said in a news release. (via United Nations News Centre - Children’s education in Central Africa Republic devastated by conflict, UN says)

23 April 2013 – Calling for quick action by authorities in the Central African Republic (CAR), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) today warned that education was becoming another casualty of the months-long conflict, with half the country’s schools shuttered and hundreds of thousands of students at risk of missing out the entire year.

At least 250,000 children who started the 2012-2013 primary school year, and 30,000 who were in secondary school at the start of the crisis, could lose the entire school year if schools do not re-open in the coming weeks, the agency said in a news release. (via United Nations News Centre - Children’s education in Central Africa Republic devastated by conflict, UN says)

KINSHASA, 10 December 2012 – New clashes in the North Kivu province have more than doubled the total number of schools affected by conflict this year to over 600, UNICEF said today. At least 240,000 students have missed weeks of schooling as a result of the conflict since April. In the aftermath of the recent fighting that led to the displacement of more than 130,000 people, families and parties involved in the conflict have since September, occupied or looted some 250 additional schools in North and South Kivu province in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

BOSASO, Puntland State of Somalia — On September 27, the Somali Youth Leaders Initiative (SYLI) with the Puntland Ministry of Education launched a five-year program to build and rehabilitate secondary schools in Puntland. The objective of the initiative, funded by USAID, is to boost enrollment and retention of secondary school students, particularly girls.

The SYLI education project is being implemented through a consortium involving Mercy Corps, Save the Children, and CARE International, in partnership with the Puntland Ministry of Education. The project is currently assisting 10 secondary schools—with a target of 20—across all regions of Puntland. It is increasing the number of classrooms, laboratories, and other learning facilities. In addition, to ensure that more girls in particular attend secondary school, the project will construct separate sanitation facilities for girls and boys, train more women teachers, run local campaigns on the importance of girls’ education, and involve the communities in school management.

An update on the use of e-readers in Africa
What does it take to introduce e-books and e-readers into communities in low income countries — and is this a good idea?
(via An update on the use of e-readers in Africa | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education)

An update on the use of e-readers in Africa

What does it take to introduce e-books and e-readers into communities in low income countries — and is this a good idea?

(via An update on the use of e-readers in Africa | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education)

A recent report, The Role of Education in Peacebuilding: A synthesis report of findings from Lebanon, Nepal and Sierra Leone, commissioned by UNICEF and written by Mario Novelli of the University of Sussex and Alan Smith of the University of Ulster, provides evidence that education can be a catalyst for peace and highlights the need for education sectors to integrate a peacebuilding perspective. (via Education is key to peace and social development | Back on Track)

A recent report, The Role of Education in Peacebuilding: A synthesis report of findings from Lebanon, Nepal and Sierra Leone, commissioned by UNICEF and written by Mario Novelli of the University of Sussex and Alan Smith of the University of Ulster, provides evidence that education can be a catalyst for peace and highlights the need for education sectors to integrate a peacebuilding perspective. (via Education is key to peace and social development | Back on Track)

Africa’s educational systems are suffering from growing pains. More students than ever are enrolling in school, but the supply of teachers and infrastructure have not kept up with demand.
Educators say about 80 percent of African students are completing primary school — thanks in part to the push to meet the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. They call for universal primary education by the 2015.
John Daniel, the president and CEO of the intergovernmental organization the Commonwealth of Learning, says success is bringing more challenges. SCOPE Secondary school students at KwaMhlanga High School in Mpumalanga, South Africa.
“The African countries achieved in 10 years what it took many developed countries 100 years to do two centuries ago,” he said, “and they don’t have many resources left over to do secondary.” (via Africa Faces Surge of Secondary School Students | Africa | English)

Africa’s educational systems are suffering from growing pains. More students than ever are enrolling in school, but the supply of teachers and infrastructure have not kept up with demand.

Educators say about 80 percent of African students are completing primary school — thanks in part to the push to meet the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. They call for universal primary education by the 2015.

John Daniel, the president and CEO of the intergovernmental organization the Commonwealth of Learning, says success is bringing more challenges. SCOPE Secondary school students at KwaMhlanga High School in Mpumalanga, South Africa.

“The African countries achieved in 10 years what it took many developed countries 100 years to do two centuries ago,” he said, “and they don’t have many resources left over to do secondary.” (via Africa Faces Surge of Secondary School Students | Africa | English)

How do you fix education in Africa, where students have far fewer opportunities than their counterparts in other parts of the world? There are two schools of thought on the subject: do you invest bottom up? Or top down?
The statistics are hard to ignore. Sub-Saharan Africa is the lowest-ranked region in the world on the United Nations’ education development index.
The U.N. education agency (UNESCO) says a quarter of all children in sub-Saharan Africa do not go to school, and account for 43 percent of the world’s out-of-school children.
Meantime, the African Union (AU) has said the continent will need to recruit more than 2 million new teachers by 2015, just three years from now.
While the U.N. and the AU agree on the scope of the education challenges facing the continent, they are from two separate schools of thought on how to remedy the situation. (via Experts Tackling Education in Africa | Africa | English)

How do you fix education in Africa, where students have far fewer opportunities than their counterparts in other parts of the world? There are two schools of thought on the subject: do you invest bottom up? Or top down?

The statistics are hard to ignore. Sub-Saharan Africa is the lowest-ranked region in the world on the United Nations’ education development index.

The U.N. education agency (UNESCO) says a quarter of all children in sub-Saharan Africa do not go to school, and account for 43 percent of the world’s out-of-school children.

Meantime, the African Union (AU) has said the continent will need to recruit more than 2 million new teachers by 2015, just three years from now.

While the U.N. and the AU agree on the scope of the education challenges facing the continent, they are from two separate schools of thought on how to remedy the situation. (via Experts Tackling Education in Africa | Africa | English)