Posts tagged China

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.
[…]
The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.
Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.

[…]

The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.

Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory
The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.
The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.
“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.
The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.
The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.
(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory

The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.

The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.

“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.

The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.

The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.

(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum
Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.
Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.
“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.
via Taipei Times

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum

Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.

Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.

“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.

via Taipei Times

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers
Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.
The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.
(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers

Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.

The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.

(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Teachers in China have the highest levels of public respect, according to an international study comparing their status in 21 countries.
Teachers in the UK were in 10th place in the global index which was compiled by the University of Sussex professor Peter Dolton.
The study was based on surveys of 1,000 adults in each of the countries.
This examined public attitudes to professional status, trust, pay and the desirability of teaching as a career.
The study confirmed the high status of teachers in China, where there is a strong cultural emphasis on the importance of education.
"Teachers are revered," says Prof Dolton.
A large majority of adults in China believed that students would respect their teachers - in contrast to most European countries where only a minority believed that students would show respect.(via BBC News - Teachers in China given highest level of public respect)

Teachers in China have the highest levels of public respect, according to an international study comparing their status in 21 countries.

Teachers in the UK were in 10th place in the global index which was compiled by the University of Sussex professor Peter Dolton.

The study was based on surveys of 1,000 adults in each of the countries.

This examined public attitudes to professional status, trust, pay and the desirability of teaching as a career.

The study confirmed the high status of teachers in China, where there is a strong cultural emphasis on the importance of education.

"Teachers are revered," says Prof Dolton.

A large majority of adults in China believed that students would respect their teachers - in contrast to most European countries where only a minority believed that students would show respect.(via BBC News - Teachers in China given highest level of public respect)

BBC

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.
(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.

(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

China just began a major education reform effort that is aimed at reducing the importance of standardized testing in determining school quality and including factors such as student engagement, boredom, anxiety, and happiness.
It also seeks to cut back on the amount of school work students are given. As scholar Yong Zhao notes in the following post, the approach is the opposite of the education reform path in the United States, which in recent years has increased the importance of test scores for accountability purposes. (via China’s new education reform: Reducing importance of test scores)

China just began a major education reform effort that is aimed at reducing the importance of standardized testing in determining school quality and including factors such as student engagement, boredom, anxiety, and happiness.

It also seeks to cut back on the amount of school work students are given. As scholar Yong Zhao notes in the following post, the approach is the opposite of the education reform path in the United States, which in recent years has increased the importance of test scores for accountability purposes. (via China’s new education reform: Reducing importance of test scores)

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.
The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.

The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

Ethiopia, Namibia, and Cote D’Ivoire have been selected as the first three countries for the implementation of a new project on quality education through teacher training supported by UNESCO and the Government of China.
WUHAN - A campaign is afoot in Chinese schools to improve children’s literacy, as educators have warned that young people are increasingly having problems writing and reading Chinese due to their extensive use of electronic devices, as well as a lack of attention paid to traditional culture.