Posts tagged EFA

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria
Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.

The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria

Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Bangladesh: Innovative Floating School Improves Access to Education
The floating school works in the remote river basin where access to education is hard, particularly during the monsoon season. From late June to October one third of the country goes underwater, making access to basic services very difficult. “It is the main reason for school drop outs in rural Bangladesh” Mosammat said. Were it not for innovative inventions such as this floating school, many of these children would find accessing education impossible.
The school collects children from their homes, teaches them on board and returns them at the end of the session. Mosammat describes the boat’s architect’s philosophy as ”if the children couldn’t come to school, then the school should come to them”.
(via Bangladesh: Innovative solutions to improve education for the disadvantaged | World Education Blog)

Bangladesh: Innovative Floating School Improves Access to Education

The floating school works in the remote river basin where access to education is hard, particularly during the monsoon season. From late June to October one third of the country goes underwater, making access to basic services very difficult. “It is the main reason for school drop outs in rural Bangladesh” Mosammat said. Were it not for innovative inventions such as this floating school, many of these children would find accessing education impossible.

The school collects children from their homes, teaches them on board and returns them at the end of the session. Mosammat describes the boat’s architect’s philosophy as ”if the children couldn’t come to school, then the school should come to them”.

(via Bangladesh: Innovative solutions to improve education for the disadvantaged | World Education Blog)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)

Jibon is 12 years old and works at a fish market in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. He lives alone with his mother, who works in a garment factory.

The little money Jibon makes is essential for the survival of his family. For this reason, Jibon dropped out of school after only the second grade. In all likelihood, he will never have the opportunity to go back to school.

“I don’t have a father. My mother has to work, but her income is not enough for me to go to school,” Jibon says. “Yes, I want to go to school, but I cannot, because we don’t have enough money.”

Jibon shares the same fate with millions of children in South Asia. According to a recent study on out-of-school children published by UNICEF and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics under the Global Out-of-School Children Initiative, 17 million children of primary-school age and 9.9 million children of lower secondary-school age are out of school in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka – placing South Asia as the region with the second-highest number of out-of-school children in the world.

(via In Bangladesh, learning why children are out of school  | Back on Track)

World Inequality Database on Education The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.
(via DME WIDE • World Inequality Database on Education)

World Inequality Database on Education

The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.

(via DME WIDE • World Inequality Database on Education)

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?

Why Girls’ Education Matters
With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

Why Girls’ Education Matters

With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’
Cibar, a bright, beautiful girl, is deaf. Even when times are good, she needs specialized help. For just over a month, she’s been living in Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq, one of the more than 61,000 Syrian refugees who have arrived since the middle of August – bringing the total registered in Iraq to 196,843. Before that, the conflict kept her away from school. Her story is tragically common.
Why, with all that’s happened, does school matter so much? Adla starts crying. “Because I want to help my mother and father,” she says, quickly wiping the tears from her eyes. But there’s no way for Adla to do that. There’s no secondary school in Kawergosk. And there is certainly no special needs teaching for Cibar.

(via Field diary: Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’ | Back on Track)

Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’

Cibar, a bright, beautiful girl, is deaf. Even when times are good, she needs specialized help. For just over a month, she’s been living in Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq, one of the more than 61,000 Syrian refugees who have arrived since the middle of August – bringing the total registered in Iraq to 196,843. Before that, the conflict kept her away from school. Her story is tragically common.

Why, with all that’s happened, does school matter so much? Adla starts crying. “Because I want to help my mother and father,” she says, quickly wiping the tears from her eyes. But there’s no way for Adla to do that. There’s no secondary school in Kawergosk. And there is certainly no special needs teaching for Cibar.

(via Field diary: Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’ | Back on Track)

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.
About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.
“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.

About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.

“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)