Posts tagged EFA

A new approach to getting girls into school in the Niger (by UNICEF)

UNICEF.org reports:

So far, 7 per cent of the two million schoolchildren in the Niger are enrolled in child-friendly schools.

Maman Boukar Kollimi, Regional Director of Education in Maradi, explains what a child-friendly school entails. “A child-friendly school is a school where life is enjoyable. It is a school where the basic needs are met, including shade trees, latrines, water points, classrooms with enough benches and tables, well-trained teachers. It is a learning environment where the community is involved in everything we do.”

Equality between girls and boys is encouraged in the classrooms – and in the school yard. Teachers are trained to provide children with a safe and gender-sensitive environment. They use teaching methods that prevent gender bias, for example, and they keep girls and boys together in lines and school activities.

Read more.

The Mozambican Ministry of Education believes that Mozambique is close to achieving the main education target in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which is universal access to primary education, but recognises that the quality of education is still low. The goal is that, by 2015, all children, both girls and boys, can complete a full course of primary education.
Education in Nigeria is in crisis: 10.5 million children are out of school, more than in any other country, and over half of adults in the country are illiterate, a legacy of decades of poor education.
[…] The education crisis in Nigeria is not only one of access, but also quality. The large number of Nigerian children and young people emerging from school with limited literacy or numeracy skills demands urgent action to improve the country’s education. 
[…] The 2012 EFA Global Monitoring Report, Youth and skills: Putting education to work, showed that among young men aged 15 to 29 in 2008 who had left school after six years of schooling, 28% were illiterate and 39% were semi-illiterate. The figures are even worse for young women: 32% were illiterate and 52% were semi-illiterate.
(via Spotlight on Nigeria’s education crisis | World Education Blog)

Education in Nigeria is in crisis: 10.5 million children are out of school, more than in any other country, and over half of adults in the country are illiterate, a legacy of decades of poor education.

[…] The education crisis in Nigeria is not only one of access, but also quality. The large number of Nigerian children and young people emerging from school with limited literacy or numeracy skills demands urgent action to improve the country’s education.

[…] The 2012 EFA Global Monitoring Report, Youth and skills: Putting education to work, showed that among young men aged 15 to 29 in 2008 who had left school after six years of schooling, 28% were illiterate and 39% were semi-illiterate. The figures are even worse for young women: 32% were illiterate and 52% were semi-illiterate.

(via Spotlight on Nigeria’s education crisis | World Education Blog)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka, 25 June 2013 – Sri Lanka has made tremendous progress in getting children into school. Due to a policy to universalize primary education over seventy years ago, 98 per cent of children enrolled in grade one now reach grade five, the final grade of primary school. (via Sri Lanka Seeks Solutions for the Last Vulnerable Children to Complete their Education | Back on Track)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka, 25 June 2013 – Sri Lanka has made tremendous progress in getting children into school. Due to a policy to universalize primary education over seventy years ago, 98 per cent of children enrolled in grade one now reach grade five, the final grade of primary school. (via Sri Lanka Seeks Solutions for the Last Vulnerable Children to Complete their Education | Back on Track)

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.
A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.

A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

Malala Yousafzai makes education plea at UN (by Channel4News)

Reuters writes:

(Reuters) - Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban last year for demanding education for girls, marked her 16th birthday with an emotional speech at the United Nations on Friday in which she said education could change the world.

"Let us pick up our books and pens. They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one pen and one book can change the world. Education is the only solution," a confident Yousafzai said to cheers from the podium.

Yousafzai was shot at close range by gunmen in October as she left school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley, northwest of the country’s capital Islamabad. She was targeted for her campaign against the Islamist Taliban efforts to deny women education.

"They shot my friends too. They thought that the bullets would silence us. But they failed and out of that silence came thousands of voices," she said in Friday’s speech.

"The terrorists thought they would change my aims and stop my ambitions, but nothing changed in my life except this: weakness, fear and hopelessness died. Strength, power and courage was born," Yousafzai said.

Check out The Guardian, Devex, and The Huffington Post for additional coverage and commentary.

Malala Yousafzai may be one of the best-known students in the world, but she is also a teacher. This month she will mark her 16th birthday by coming to the United Nations and sharing an important lesson about education — particularly for girls around the world.
Malala is the courageous young education rights campaigner from Pakistan who was targeted and shot by extremists on her way to school. After a long road to recovery, Malala is back and determined to keep making her voice heard.
On 12 July, Malala will be joined by hundreds of students from more than 80 countries in a unique Youth Assembly, where diplomats will take a back seat as young people take over the UN. They will gather to issue a global call for quality education for all. (via UN Global Education First Initiative – United Nations Secretary General’s Global Initiative on Education – Malala Comes to the United Nations)
Photo credit: Vitalvoices.org

Malala Yousafzai may be one of the best-known students in the world, but she is also a teacher. This month she will mark her 16th birthday by coming to the United Nations and sharing an important lesson about education — particularly for girls around the world.

Malala is the courageous young education rights campaigner from Pakistan who was targeted and shot by extremists on her way to school. After a long road to recovery, Malala is back and determined to keep making her voice heard.

On 12 July, Malala will be joined by hundreds of students from more than 80 countries in a unique Youth Assembly, where diplomats will take a back seat as young people take over the UN. They will gather to issue a global call for quality education for all. (via UN Global Education First Initiative – United Nations Secretary General’s Global Initiative on Education – Malala Comes to the United Nations)

Photo credit: Vitalvoices.org

A 15-year-old Pakistani girl targeted by assassins – Malala Yousafzai – is the first signatory of a new worldwide petition calling for urgent action to ensure the right of every child to safely attend school, launched today with the backing of the United Nations Special Envoy for Education.
The launch came in the wake of an attack that killed 14 students at an all girls’ college in Pakistan, emphasized Special Envoy Gordon Brown, in an op-ed published today in the Huffington Post. (via United Nations News Centre - UN envoy and young Pakistani activist launch drive for safe, universal education)

A 15-year-old Pakistani girl targeted by assassins – Malala Yousafzai – is the first signatory of a new worldwide petition calling for urgent action to ensure the right of every child to safely attend school, launched today with the backing of the United Nations Special Envoy for Education.

The launch came in the wake of an attack that killed 14 students at an all girls’ college in Pakistan, emphasized Special Envoy Gordon Brown, in an op-ed published today in the Huffington Post. (via United Nations News Centre - UN envoy and young Pakistani activist launch drive for safe, universal education)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to more than half of the world’s out-of-school children: 22% of children of primary school age in sub-Saharan Africa have either never attended school, or left before completing.
The EFA Global Monitoring Report and the UNESCO Institute of Statistics released new data this week showing that the number of children out of school in sub-Saharan Africa has remained at about 30 million over the last five years, of which 16 million are girls. This stalling of progress is partly because there is unfulfilled demand as the region’s school-age population is increasing. It’s not all bad news, however: some countries are making significant progress towards universal primary education. (via Spotlight on Africa: who’s going to school? | World Education Blog)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to more than half of the world’s out-of-school children: 22% of children of primary school age in sub-Saharan Africa have either never attended school, or left before completing.

The EFA Global Monitoring Report and the UNESCO Institute of Statistics released new data this week showing that the number of children out of school in sub-Saharan Africa has remained at about 30 million over the last five years, of which 16 million are girls. This stalling of progress is partly because there is unfulfilled demand as the region’s school-age population is increasing. It’s not all bad news, however: some countries are making significant progress towards universal primary education. (via Spotlight on Africa: who’s going to school? | World Education Blog)

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.
The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.

The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)