Posts tagged Education

Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education: Ontario, Canada
Most Canadian high school students do well in education, independently of their socio-economic status, their first language or whether they were born in Canada or elsewhere. Provincial governments are in charge of education policy, and the province of Ontario provides a good illustration of the factors behind the educational success of the nation as a whole. (via Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education)

Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education: Ontario, Canada

Most Canadian high school students do well in education, independently of their socio-economic status, their first language or whether they were born in Canada or elsewhere. Provincial governments are in charge of education policy, and the province of Ontario provides a good illustration of the factors behind the educational success of the nation as a whole. (via Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education)

New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful
The already muddy research on whether it’s better to hold back struggling students or promote them to the next grade just got muddier. A new study ,“The Scarring Effects of Primary-Grade Retention? A Study of Cumulative Advantage in the Educational Career,” by Notre Dame sociologist Megan Andrew, published Sept. 26, 2014, in the journal Social Forces is an empirically solid analysis that adds more weight to those who say retention — what education wonks call repeating a grade — is ultimately harmful.
(via New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful | Education By The Numbers)

New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful

The already muddy research on whether it’s better to hold back struggling students or promote them to the next grade just got muddier. A new study ,“The Scarring Effects of Primary-Grade Retention? A Study of Cumulative Advantage in the Educational Career,” by Notre Dame sociologist Megan Andrew, published Sept. 26, 2014, in the journal Social Forces is an empirically solid analysis that adds more weight to those who say retention — what education wonks call repeating a grade — is ultimately harmful.

(via New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful | Education By The Numbers)

Mississippi’s youngest students pile on the absences, lose learning time
[…] two months since the school year began, 29 percent of the 298 kindergarten students at Neshoba Central have missed at least one day. Eight have missed five days or more.
Statewide, kindergarteners have the lowest average daily attendance rate of any K-8 grade; just 94.5 percent during the 2012-13 school year, according to a Hechinger Report analysis of state education data. That means, on any given day, more than 2,300 Mississippi kindergarteners are out of school.
(via Mississippi’s youngest students pile on the absences, lose learning time | The Hechinger Report)

Mississippi’s youngest students pile on the absences, lose learning time

[…] two months since the school year began, 29 percent of the 298 kindergarten students at Neshoba Central have missed at least one day. Eight have missed five days or more.

Statewide, kindergarteners have the lowest average daily attendance rate of any K-8 grade; just 94.5 percent during the 2012-13 school year, according to a Hechinger Report analysis of state education data. That means, on any given day, more than 2,300 Mississippi kindergarteners are out of school.

(via Mississippi’s youngest students pile on the absences, lose learning time | The Hechinger Report)

Some schools are canceling recess. But this North Carolina grade school is going in the opposite direction: Kids ride bikes as they read.
(via This School Has Bikes Instead Of Desks—And It Turns Out That’s A Better Way To Learn | Co.Exist | ideas impact)

Some schools are canceling recess. But this North Carolina grade school is going in the opposite direction: Kids ride bikes as they read.

(via This School Has Bikes Instead Of Desks—And It Turns Out That’s A Better Way To Learn | Co.Exist | ideas impact)

Lattakia/Damascus, 7 October 2014 – As part of the ‘Back to Learning’ campaign underway in Syria, hundreds of displaced children at a Lattakia shelter school have received UNICEF school bags filled with stationery supplies.
Each of the blue school bags contain basic stationery supplies that facilitate children’s learning including coloured pencils, notebooks, pencils, pens, erasers, rulers, protractors and a pencil case.
9-year old Nooran, who was displaced from Aleppo and missed two years of school, proudly shows her new school bag: “I am happy to be back at school. I am happy that my dad enrolled me back in school. I’ve been coming every day and now I am so happy to have all these pens and notebooks because I love to learn.”
(via “I am so happy to have these pens and bags – I love to learn” | #ChildrenofSyria)

Lattakia/Damascus, 7 October 2014 – As part of the ‘Back to Learning’ campaign underway in Syria, hundreds of displaced children at a Lattakia shelter school have received UNICEF school bags filled with stationery supplies.

Each of the blue school bags contain basic stationery supplies that facilitate children’s learning including coloured pencils, notebooks, pencils, pens, erasers, rulers, protractors and a pencil case.

9-year old Nooran, who was displaced from Aleppo and missed two years of school, proudly shows her new school bag: “I am happy to be back at school. I am happy that my dad enrolled me back in school. I’ve been coming every day and now I am so happy to have all these pens and notebooks because I love to learn.”

(via “I am so happy to have these pens and bags – I love to learn” | #ChildrenofSyria)

Promises have been made, and broken, about every child’s right to primary education by 2015. Yet, just months away from the deadline, a new policy paper released on World Teachers’ Day by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the EFA Global Monitoring Report shows that the global demand for teachers will soar from 4 million in 2015 to 27 million by 2030. This demand for new teachers is both to keep up with growing school populations and to make up for teachers who are leaving the profession each year. In the race to fill these gaps, many countries are throwing learning into question by hiring teachers with little or no training.
(via Wanted: Trained Teachers to Ensure Every Child’s Right to Education | Global Partnership for Education)

Promises have been made, and broken, about every child’s right to primary education by 2015. Yet, just months away from the deadline, a new policy paper released on World Teachers’ Day by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the EFA Global Monitoring Report shows that the global demand for teachers will soar from 4 million in 2015 to 27 million by 2030. This demand for new teachers is both to keep up with growing school populations and to make up for teachers who are leaving the profession each year. In the race to fill these gaps, many countries are throwing learning into question by hiring teachers with little or no training.

(via Wanted: Trained Teachers to Ensure Every Child’s Right to Education | Global Partnership for Education)

via Global Partnership for Education

Teachers unite!

In the past two weeks, our Unite for Quality Education campaign culminated in events across the globe: From Buenos Aires to Sidney, Delhi, Brussels, Pretoria, and New York, education leaders, teachers and students from five continents have pushed quality education to the top of the development agenda.

With our round-the-world voyage we celebrated the conclusion of the year-long campaign, which brought awareness to the issues concerning teachers that we must continue to tackle as the global development agenda prepares to move beyond 2015.

A Finnish learning concept focusing on entrepreneurship, economy and society has been named the winner of the 2014 World Innovation Summit for Education. The project, known as Me & My City, was judged to be of outstanding quality and to have achieved exceptional impact through its target sixth grade students.
(via Finnish school entrepreneurship programme wins education innovation award | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi)

A Finnish learning concept focusing on entrepreneurship, economy and society has been named the winner of the 2014 World Innovation Summit for Education. The project, known as Me & My City, was judged to be of outstanding quality and to have achieved exceptional impact through its target sixth grade students.

(via Finnish school entrepreneurship programme wins education innovation award | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi)

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.
Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.
… almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.
(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.

Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.

almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.

(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

Canada Helping Children in Remote Regions of Kenya Access Quality Education

image

August 21, 2014: Canada’s support to UNICEF will help provide more children with specialized teachers, safe schools, and more effective delivery of education in remote communities.

The project aims to increase the number of children, especially girls, attending school in Garissa and Turkana counties, two remote and arid regions of Kenya with high poverty rates, recurrent droughts, and large refugee populations. In these counties, access to governmental services is low, especially for nomadic communities. The project also aims to improve children’s education through activities that include training teachers, renovating classrooms, setting up mobile schools and upgrading the national curriculum.

Source: ReliefWeb