Posts tagged India

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.
The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.
(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.

The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.

(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

Education as an Antidote to Severe Poverty and Maoist Uprisings
Morning started with an assembly at a school called KISS, the Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences in Bhubaneswar, the capital of Odisha (formerly Orissa) in east India. Thousands of students in crisp uniforms lined the expansive field, listened to announcements and sang in the morning sun. It’s an inspiring sight due to their shear numbers and the remarkable order among so many young students. At this social enterprise, Adivasi—or indigenous—children are provided with an education, regular meals and access to healthcare at no cost. Opportunities such as this are extremely rare for Adivasis, and while KISS is a bright spot in the landscape of challenges faced by this group, tremendous hardship and poverty persists.

There are 400 distinct aboriginal tribes in India, numbering about 80 million. For millennia, they’ve lived in near isolation in forests across central and eastern India. The prejudice faced by Adivasis across the country is extreme and seemingly insurmountable. Even today, they are not accepted into Indian society and have only have themselves and their land to rely on. This means healthcare, education and regular meals often elude them. (via Struggle of the Adivasis | Pulitzer Center)

Education as an Antidote to Severe Poverty and Maoist Uprisings

Morning started with an assembly at a school called KISS, the Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences in Bhubaneswar, the capital of Odisha (formerly Orissa) in east India. Thousands of students in crisp uniforms lined the expansive field, listened to announcements and sang in the morning sun. It’s an inspiring sight due to their shear numbers and the remarkable order among so many young students. At this social enterprise, Adivasi—or indigenous—children are provided with an education, regular meals and access to healthcare at no cost. Opportunities such as this are extremely rare for Adivasis, and while KISS is a bright spot in the landscape of challenges faced by this group, tremendous hardship and poverty persists.

There are 400 distinct aboriginal tribes in India, numbering about 80 million. For millennia, they’ve lived in near isolation in forests across central and eastern India. The prejudice faced by Adivasis across the country is extreme and seemingly insurmountable. Even today, they are not accepted into Indian society and have only have themselves and their land to rely on. This means healthcare, education and regular meals often elude them. (via Struggle of the Adivasis | Pulitzer Center)

As India celebrated Akshaya Tritiya on Tuesday, a festival associated with mass weddings, many activists renewed their calls against child marriage. “Raise your voice against child marriage on #AkshayTritiya, an auspicious day for Hindu marriage in India,” UNICEF India said on Twitter.
There are many campaigns around the world against child marriage in India, where the practice remains common despite being illegal. Perhaps the most original one is “The Girl Store” - which some may find is in bad taste. (via ‘Buy a Girl:’ An Unusual Anti Child Marriage Campaign - India Real Time - WSJ)

As India celebrated Akshaya Tritiya on Tuesday, a festival associated with mass weddings, many activists renewed their calls against child marriage. “Raise your voice against child marriage on #AkshayTritiya, an auspicious day for Hindu marriage in India,” UNICEF India said on Twitter.

There are many campaigns around the world against child marriage in India, where the practice remains common despite being illegal. Perhaps the most original one is “The Girl Store” - which some may find is in bad taste. (via ‘Buy a Girl:’ An Unusual Anti Child Marriage Campaign - India Real Time - WSJ)

[INDIA] The National council of teacher education (NCTE) has taken an initiative to reform and revamp teaching education system in the country. Following the implementation of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education-2009, the government is now gearing up to reform the teaching education system with an aim to improve the quality of procedures and practices. Following the exercise, all courses of teacher education like BEd, MEd, NTT (Nursery Teachers Training), BPEd and MPEd will get revised.

Indian culture reflected poorly in school syllabi, finds survey - Hindustan Times

The survey found that texts such as Ramayana, Mahabharata and tales from Panchatantra, Jataka and Hitopadesha were omitted from textbooks but Aesop’s Fables had been included.

"It is shocking that the south and north-eastern parts of India are almost neglected in the textbooks which are overwhelmingly tilted toward central and north India," said the survey report, which rated books on different parameters such as tradition and culture, history, heritage, Indian thought and spirituality.

In Bihar, one of India’s poorest and most populous states, half of the women and a quarter of the men are illiterate, and about 90% of its 104 million inhabitants live in rural areas. Life here is particularly difficult for girls, and one of the greatest hindrances to their development is the simple journey to school. For many, the trip is long, expensive and dangerous.
But here, in rural Bihar, we recently saw that a two-wheeled solution to the problem has been found.
Three years ago the state’s new chief minister Nitish Kumar adopted a “gender agenda” and set about redressing his state’s endemic gender imbalances in an attempt to boost development in one of India’s most backward states. His vision was to bring a sense of independence and purpose to his state’s young women, and the flagship initiative of this agenda is the Mukhyamantri Balika Cycle Yojna, a project that gives schoolgirls 2,000 rupees (about £25) to purchase a bicycle.
(via How cycling set deprived Indian girls on a life-long journey | Bike blog | Environment | guardian.co.uk)

In Bihar, one of India’s poorest and most populous states, half of the women and a quarter of the men are illiterate, and about 90% of its 104 million inhabitants live in rural areas. Life here is particularly difficult for girls, and one of the greatest hindrances to their development is the simple journey to school. For many, the trip is long, expensive and dangerous.

But here, in rural Bihar, we recently saw that a two-wheeled solution to the problem has been found.

Three years ago the state’s new chief minister Nitish Kumar adopted a “gender agenda” and set about redressing his state’s endemic gender imbalances in an attempt to boost development in one of India’s most backward states. His vision was to bring a sense of independence and purpose to his state’s young women, and the flagship initiative of this agenda is the Mukhyamantri Balika Cycle Yojna, a project that gives schoolgirls 2,000 rupees (about £25) to purchase a bicycle.

(via How cycling set deprived Indian girls on a life-long journey | Bike blog | Environment | guardian.co.uk)

[INDIA] In Delhi, children from low-income households are being encouraged to attend school on old buses that have been converted into classrooms. The buses travel to selected points of the city and offer two hours of lessons a day. The scheme is supported by Unicef and the local authorities. (via India’s mobile schools - video | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

[NEW DELHI] India introduced a cheap tablet computer Wednesday, saying it would deliver modern technology to the countryside to help lift villagers out of poverty.
Developer Datawind is selling the tablets to the government for about  $45 each, and subsidies will reduce that to $35 for students and  teachers.
Datawind  says it can make about 100,000 units a month at the moment, not nearly  enough to meet India’s hope of getting its 220 million children online.
(via India announces $35 tablet computer to help lift villagers out of poverty - The Washington Post)

[NEW DELHI] India introduced a cheap tablet computer Wednesday, saying it would deliver modern technology to the countryside to help lift villagers out of poverty.

Developer Datawind is selling the tablets to the government for about $45 each, and subsidies will reduce that to $35 for students and teachers.

Datawind says it can make about 100,000 units a month at the moment, not nearly enough to meet India’s hope of getting its 220 million children online.

(via India announces $35 tablet computer to help lift villagers out of poverty - The Washington Post)