Posts tagged Lebanon

Three years ago, after they had first fled to Damascus, Shaiima and her family then fled again, crossing the border into Lebanon after a harrowing journey. They set up what was supposed to be a short-term, alternative shelter amid some 15 tents.

Today, they are among 1,000 refugees living on this strip of muddy lowland next to a polluted stream, and the makeshift tent has become their home for an indeterminate future. 

[…] Children are now able to attend non-formal educational classes organized by local NGO Beyond Association, supported by UNICEF, right on the settlement. The child-friendly spaces provide basic literacy and numeracy classes, an accelerated learning programme, English lessons, psychosocial support and structured recreational activities for the refugee children. Some 400 children between the ages of 6 and 14 participate in either the morning or afternoon shifts. (via Refugee children determined to keep learning, as Syrian conflict reaches three-year mark | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)

Before the crisis, the rate of primary school enrolment in the Syrian Arab Republic had surpassed 90 per cent. But, education has not been spared, amid the disintegration of other vital infrastructure. During the past school year, almost two million Syrian children aged 6–15 dropped out of school because of conflict and displacement. While many have become refugees, more than half – one million children – remain out of school inside the Syrian Arab Republic. 

via Syrian refugee children speak out (by unicef) and For Syrian children, education needs are urgent, and urgently underfunded

"These children come to school with a deep desire for learning," says Ali Hujeiri, 55, the school principal. "They know what they’ve missed and now they appreciate the value of their education."
They have arrived from Syrian towns and cities such as Qusayr, Dara’a and Homs – places that are now battlegrounds. At least one of the boys in the class has seen his home blown to pieces. But somehow the silent walls of school that provide them a place for study also nurture a sense of hope beyond conflict. Here Billal, aged 11, can dream of becoming a teacher. Halid, also 11, aspires one day to be a doctor. Ten-year-old Selieman wants to be a hairdresser.
Arsal was once a sleepy town nestled in the hills a few kilometres from the Syrian border. When war broke out in Syria two years ago, the town bulged as civilians, most of them women and children, fled to Lebanon. Soon Arsal grew by 10,000 people – roughly half were children. (via A learning curve for young Syrian refugees at model school in Lebanon | ReliefWeb)

"These children come to school with a deep desire for learning," says Ali Hujeiri, 55, the school principal. "They know what they’ve missed and now they appreciate the value of their education."

They have arrived from Syrian towns and cities such as Qusayr, Dara’a and Homs – places that are now battlegrounds. At least one of the boys in the class has seen his home blown to pieces. But somehow the silent walls of school that provide them a place for study also nurture a sense of hope beyond conflict. Here Billal, aged 11, can dream of becoming a teacher. Halid, also 11, aspires one day to be a doctor. Ten-year-old Selieman wants to be a hairdresser.

Arsal was once a sleepy town nestled in the hills a few kilometres from the Syrian border. When war broke out in Syria two years ago, the town bulged as civilians, most of them women and children, fled to Lebanon. Soon Arsal grew by 10,000 people – roughly half were children. (via A learning curve for young Syrian refugees at model school in Lebanon | ReliefWeb)

[Lebanon] Language Barriers Prevent Syrian Children from Attending School

"I want them to go to school, but it’s so far away. I can’t afford the cost of transport. It’s also difficult because here they speak French or English at school. My children won’t understand anything", explained Dima’s sister.

A critical problem facing Syrian children in Lebanon is that the education system uses French or English as the language of instruction, with Arabic only reserved for language courses and sometimes history lessons. Conversely, in Syria the education system is entirely in Arabic.

A rapid needs assessment carried out in late 2012 by the UN children’s fund in Lebanon (UNICEF) and Save the Children also cited language barriers as the principal obstacle for Syrians in Lebanon. The report found that most Syrians would like their children to learn either French or English as they see it as a “chance for upward mobility”.

[…]

In addition, the Lebanese education system is unable to cope with the influx of Syrians across the border. More than 160,000 Syrians are officially registered with the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) in Lebanon and a further 71,358 are awaiting registration. This number is increasing rapidly as up to 3,000 Syrians are crossing the borders daily to Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan and Iraq.

LEBANON: Though illegal, punishment gets physical in schools

In a sixth-grade class at a Lebanon elementary school, a student told a mischievous joke, garnering some laughs from his classmates. The teacher, angry, approached one of the giggling classmates, an 11-year-old girl named Jinan; she slapped her, leaving a red welt across the student’s cheek.

Jinan’s story is not unique. A teenage student named Jawad faced a similar brand of tough punishment when, after smiling and greeting people through a window that overlooks a corridor, his math teacher slapped him. It just so happened that Jawad’s mother was at the school that day. Enraged, she entered the classroom and argued with the teacher.

A recent report, The Role of Education in Peacebuilding: A synthesis report of findings from Lebanon, Nepal and Sierra Leone, commissioned by UNICEF and written by Mario Novelli of the University of Sussex and Alan Smith of the University of Ulster, provides evidence that education can be a catalyst for peace and highlights the need for education sectors to integrate a peacebuilding perspective. (via Education is key to peace and social development | Back on Track)

A recent report, The Role of Education in Peacebuilding: A synthesis report of findings from Lebanon, Nepal and Sierra Leone, commissioned by UNICEF and written by Mario Novelli of the University of Sussex and Alan Smith of the University of Ulster, provides evidence that education can be a catalyst for peace and highlights the need for education sectors to integrate a peacebuilding perspective. (via Education is key to peace and social development | Back on Track)

[LEBANON] The teacher unions demand that the national authorities amend the proposals and offer a wage increase equal to the rate of inflation, as well as rejecting unjustified proposals to introduce new taxes. This strike action demonstrated the unity of all primary and secondary school teachers in both the public and private sectors.