Posts tagged MDGs

61 million children are yet to go to school. When Will They Learn? (by Education Envoy). More here and here.

Improving the lives of women begins with investing in girls. Educating girls brings enormous benefits far beyond improving the lives of the girls themselves. Once an educated girl becomes an adult, it is estimated she will earn 20 percent more for each additional year of education she receives beyond grade three or four. Statistics show she will more likely share up to 90 percent of her earnings with her family and her community. She will marry and bear children later, and they will be healthier and more likely to go to school than will the children of her less literate sisters. (via Investing In Girls | Editorials | Editorial)

Improving the lives of women begins with investing in girls. Educating girls brings enormous benefits far beyond improving the lives of the girls themselves. Once an educated girl becomes an adult, it is estimated she will earn 20 percent more for each additional year of education she receives beyond grade three or four. Statistics show she will more likely share up to 90 percent of her earnings with her family and her community. She will marry and bear children later, and they will be healthier and more likely to go to school than will the children of her less literate sisters. (via Investing In Girls | Editorials | Editorial)

Africa’s educational systems are suffering from growing pains. More students than ever are enrolling in school, but the supply of teachers and infrastructure have not kept up with demand.
Educators say about 80 percent of African students are completing primary school — thanks in part to the push to meet the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. They call for universal primary education by the 2015.
John Daniel, the president and CEO of the intergovernmental organization the Commonwealth of Learning, says success is bringing more challenges. SCOPE Secondary school students at KwaMhlanga High School in Mpumalanga, South Africa.
“The African countries achieved in 10 years what it took many developed countries 100 years to do two centuries ago,” he said, “and they don’t have many resources left over to do secondary.” (via Africa Faces Surge of Secondary School Students | Africa | English)

Africa’s educational systems are suffering from growing pains. More students than ever are enrolling in school, but the supply of teachers and infrastructure have not kept up with demand.

Educators say about 80 percent of African students are completing primary school — thanks in part to the push to meet the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. They call for universal primary education by the 2015.

John Daniel, the president and CEO of the intergovernmental organization the Commonwealth of Learning, says success is bringing more challenges. SCOPE Secondary school students at KwaMhlanga High School in Mpumalanga, South Africa.

“The African countries achieved in 10 years what it took many developed countries 100 years to do two centuries ago,” he said, “and they don’t have many resources left over to do secondary.” (via Africa Faces Surge of Secondary School Students | Africa | English)

How do you fix education in Africa, where students have far fewer opportunities than their counterparts in other parts of the world? There are two schools of thought on the subject: do you invest bottom up? Or top down?
The statistics are hard to ignore. Sub-Saharan Africa is the lowest-ranked region in the world on the United Nations’ education development index.
The U.N. education agency (UNESCO) says a quarter of all children in sub-Saharan Africa do not go to school, and account for 43 percent of the world’s out-of-school children.
Meantime, the African Union (AU) has said the continent will need to recruit more than 2 million new teachers by 2015, just three years from now.
While the U.N. and the AU agree on the scope of the education challenges facing the continent, they are from two separate schools of thought on how to remedy the situation. (via Experts Tackling Education in Africa | Africa | English)

How do you fix education in Africa, where students have far fewer opportunities than their counterparts in other parts of the world? There are two schools of thought on the subject: do you invest bottom up? Or top down?

The statistics are hard to ignore. Sub-Saharan Africa is the lowest-ranked region in the world on the United Nations’ education development index.

The U.N. education agency (UNESCO) says a quarter of all children in sub-Saharan Africa do not go to school, and account for 43 percent of the world’s out-of-school children.

Meantime, the African Union (AU) has said the continent will need to recruit more than 2 million new teachers by 2015, just three years from now.

While the U.N. and the AU agree on the scope of the education challenges facing the continent, they are from two separate schools of thought on how to remedy the situation. (via Experts Tackling Education in Africa | Africa | English)

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

[ANGOLA] In her job as a teacher-training co-ordinator in Huíla province, 43-year-old nun, Sister Cecília Kuyela witnesses school overcrowding every day. Primary School 200, which serves the poor area of João de Almeida, has 7,348 pupils for 138 teachers and eight permanent classrooms. At peak periods, classes are held in the street. But that is the least of Sister Cecília’s worries. (via Angola is facing a teaching crisis that seems without end | Alex Duval Smith | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

[ANGOLA] In her job as a teacher-training co-ordinator in Huíla province, 43-year-old nun, Sister Cecília Kuyela witnesses school overcrowding every day. Primary School 200, which serves the poor area of João de Almeida, has 7,348 pupils for 138 teachers and eight permanent classrooms. At peak periods, classes are held in the street. But that is the least of Sister Cecília’s worries. (via Angola is facing a teaching crisis that seems without end | Alex Duval Smith | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

The world urgently needs to recruit more than 8 million extra teachers, according to UN estimates, warning that a looming shortage of primary school teachers threatens to undermine global efforts to ensure universal access to primary education by 2015.
At least 2m new teaching positions will need to be created by 2015, the UN said in a report published this week. An additional 6.2 million teachers will need to be recruited to maintain current workforces and replace those expected to retire or leave classrooms due to career changes, illnesses, or death. (via Global teacher shortage threatens progress on education | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

The world urgently needs to recruit more than 8 million extra teachers, according to UN estimates, warning that a looming shortage of primary school teachers threatens to undermine global efforts to ensure universal access to primary education by 2015.

At least 2m new teaching positions will need to be created by 2015, the UN said in a report published this week. An additional 6.2 million teachers will need to be recruited to maintain current workforces and replace those expected to retire or leave classrooms due to career changes, illnesses, or death. (via Global teacher shortage threatens progress on education | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Kicking off a campaign aimed at making March “the month that Pakistan talks about only two things: education and cricket”, a government commission has painted a damning picture of the country’s education system, whose poor progress towards global learning goals has been documented in the Education for All Global Monitoring Report. (via Pakistan declares ‘education emergency’ « World Education Blog)

Kicking off a campaign aimed at making March “the month that Pakistan talks about only two things: education and cricket”, a government commission has painted a damning picture of the country’s education system, whose poor progress towards global learning goals has been documented in the Education for All Global Monitoring Report. (via Pakistan declares ‘education emergency’ « World Education Blog)

In many ways, Kenya is an example of an African success story in education. According to the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report, growth in the number of children attending school has accelerated, the gender gap has narrowed and it is one of the few countries in the region expected to achieve the Education for All goal of halving adult illiteracy by 2015. Efforts are being made to ensure education quality does not suffer as the number entering school expands. The Kenyan government should be commended for its efforts in all of these areas. (via For refugees in Kenya, ‘education is the only thing we can take home’ « World Education Blog)

In many ways, Kenya is an example of an African success story in education. According to the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report, growth in the number of children attending school has accelerated, the gender gap has narrowed and it is one of the few countries in the region expected to achieve the Education for All goal of halving adult illiteracy by 2015. Efforts are being made to ensure education quality does not suffer as the number entering school expands. The Kenyan government should be commended for its efforts in all of these areas. (via For refugees in Kenya, ‘education is the only thing we can take home’ « World Education Blog)

MADAGASCAR: No more free primary schooling

ANTANANARIVO, 18 March 2011 (IRIN) - The burden of paying for education in Madagascar has shifted to the poor after donor funding was frozen in the wake of a coup on 17 March 2009.