Posts tagged Mali

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.
Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life
(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.

Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life

(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

UNICEF gears up to help over 500,000 Malian children return to school

BAMAKO/DAKAR, 3 September 2013 – With the new school year in Mali starting on the 1st of October, UNICEF is scaling up efforts to give a school place to half a million children whose lives were disrupted by the conflict, seasonal flooding and nutrition crisis.

Under the leadership of the Malian government and in collaboration with partners, UNICEF is mobilising teachers and parents to get children back to school and give them an improved education.

Across Mali, about 9,000 teachers will receive training throughout the 2013–2014 academic year. In addition, temporary learning spaces will be set up and minor repairs undertaken while damaged schools are rehabilitated. About 15,000 of the pupils will listen to lessons at new desks as part of the refurbishment efforts.

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.
A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.

A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

unicef:

Mali: School of Hope
It’s been almost 10 years since teachers searched the streets of Bamako, Mali for hearing-impaired children, 19 of whom would be their first pupils. Today, the School of Hope is ensuring that its 160 pupils have an education – and a role at the centre of their families.

It is estimated that 90 per cent of the pupils at the School of Hope are survivors of meningitis – an inflammation of the protective membranes of the spine and brain.

In 2011, UNICEF reached nearly 11 million Malians under the age of 29 through an aggressive meningitis vaccination campaign.

Like all children, those with disabilities have many abilities, but are often excluded from society by discrimination and lack of support, leaving them among the most invisible and vulnerable children in the world.

On 30 May, UNICEF launched its flagship report The State of the World’s Children 2013: Children with Disabilities. The report brings global attention to the urgent needs of a largely invisible population.

Read more: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/mali_69546.html

Getting Mauritania’s refugee children back into school (by unicef)

Also see here.

DAKAR, 15 March 2013 (IRIN) - Aid workers and experts are calling for more attention to education in Mali, where 200,000 children are out of school due to the crisis but where money for emergency education has yet to come forward.
Though most schools in northern Mali are closed or thinly staffed, and thousands of children risk missing two years of schooling, donors have once again de-prioritized education to focus on what they say are more direct life-saving activities. 
[ … ] 
The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says dozens of schools in the north have been closed, destroyed, looted or, in places, contaminated with unexploded ordnance. It estimates the education of 700,000 children across Mali has been disrupted by the crisis. In the north, some 5 percent of schools have reopened in Timbuktu; a handful in Kidal; and more in Gao, but only 28 percent of teachers were estimated to have returned to work there as of the end of February, said UNICEF. Many teachers are too afraid to return to the north, while already overcrowded schools in the south cannot cope with the influx. 
(via IRIN Africa | Call to end neglect of emergency education in Mali | Burkina Faso | Mali | Mauritania | Niger | Chad | Aid Policy | Children | Conflict | Education | Natural Disasters | Refugees/IDPs)

DAKAR, 15 March 2013 (IRIN) - Aid workers and experts are calling for more attention to education in Mali, where 200,000 children are out of school due to the crisis but where money for emergency education has yet to come forward.

Though most schools in northern Mali are closed or thinly staffed, and thousands of children risk missing two years of schooling, donors have once again de-prioritized education to focus on what they say are more direct life-saving activities.

[ … ]

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says dozens of schools in the north have been closed, destroyed, looted or, in places, contaminated with unexploded ordnance. It estimates the education of 700,000 children across Mali has been disrupted by the crisis. 

In the north, some 5 percent of schools have reopened in Timbuktu; a handful in Kidal; and more in Gao, but only 28 percent of teachers were estimated to have returned to work there as of the end of February, said UNICEF. 

Many teachers are too afraid to return to the north, while already overcrowded schools in the south cannot cope with the influx. 

(via IRIN Africa | Call to end neglect of emergency education in Mali | Burkina Faso | Mali | Mauritania | Niger | Chad | Aid Policy | Children | Conflict | Education | Natural Disasters | Refugees/IDPs)

BAMAKO/TIMBUKTU/DAKAR, 4 February 2013 (IRIN) - Children returned to school in Timbuktu in northern Mali on 1 February, a week after Islamist groups fled.

Teachers say about half of all schoolchildren fled northern Mali in 2012 when Islamist groups took over much of the north and shut down many public schools, dismantled the curricula in others, and sent some children to Koranic schools.

“You cannot imagine the joy I felt in returning to this classroom,” said the director of Timbuktu’s main primary school, Coulibaly Ami Doucaré. She abandoned the school last April when Timbuktu was taken over by Islamist group Ansar Dine.

[Bamako/Timbuktu/Dakar] Children returned to school in Timbuktu in northern Mali on 1 February, a week after Islamist groups fled.
Teachers say about half of all schoolchildren fled northern Mali in 2012 when Islamist groups took over much of the north and shut down many public schools, dismantled the curricula in others, and sent some children to Koranic schools.
“You cannot imagine the joy I felt in returning to this classroom,” said director of Timbuktu’s main primary school, Coulibaly Ami Doucaré. She abandoned the school last April when Timbuktu was taken over by Islamist group Ansar Dine.
(via allAfrica.com: Mali: Schools Reopen in Mali’s Timbuktu)

[Bamako/Timbuktu/Dakar] Children returned to school in Timbuktu in northern Mali on 1 February, a week after Islamist groups fled.

Teachers say about half of all schoolchildren fled northern Mali in 2012 when Islamist groups took over much of the north and shut down many public schools, dismantled the curricula in others, and sent some children to Koranic schools.

“You cannot imagine the joy I felt in returning to this classroom,” said director of Timbuktu’s main primary school, Coulibaly Ami Doucaré. She abandoned the school last April when Timbuktu was taken over by Islamist group Ansar Dine.

(via allAfrica.com: Mali: Schools Reopen in Mali’s Timbuktu)

More than half of primary school teachers in Mali are without a basic teaching qualification and the competences required to deliver quality education, according to a new study commissioned by EI and Oxfam Novib. (via Education International - Mali: New study reveals serious teacher quality challenges)

More than half of primary school teachers in Mali are without a basic teaching qualification and the competences required to deliver quality education, according to a new study commissioned by EI and Oxfam Novib. (via Education International - Mali: New study reveals serious teacher quality challenges)

'Girl friendly/child-friendly' schools provide a brighter future in Mali (by unicef)