Posts tagged Niger

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

A new approach to getting girls into school in the Niger (by UNICEF)

UNICEF.org reports:

So far, 7 per cent of the two million schoolchildren in the Niger are enrolled in child-friendly schools.

Maman Boukar Kollimi, Regional Director of Education in Maradi, explains what a child-friendly school entails. “A child-friendly school is a school where life is enjoyable. It is a school where the basic needs are met, including shade trees, latrines, water points, classrooms with enough benches and tables, well-trained teachers. It is a learning environment where the community is involved in everything we do.”

Equality between girls and boys is encouraged in the classrooms – and in the school yard. Teachers are trained to provide children with a safe and gender-sensitive environment. They use teaching methods that prevent gender bias, for example, and they keep girls and boys together in lines and school activities.

Read more.

[NIGER] NIAMEY , May 20 2013 (IPS) - A decade ago, less than a third of school-aged girls in Niger were in class. Today, though significant cultural and religious opposition remains, nearly two-thirds of girls are enrolled in school.
“Back in 2003, we had only 15 girls at my school, out of 150 students. Now, we have 103 girls out of a total of 175 students,” said Ibrahim Sani, who has taught for 17 years in the town of Agadez, in the northern part of this West African country.
Between 2001 and 2011, Niger’s overall rate of enrolment for girls rose from 29 to 63 percent, according to the Ministry of Education. (via IPS – It Takes a Village to Educate a Girl | Inter Press Service)

[NIGER] NIAMEY , May 20 2013 (IPS) - A decade ago, less than a third of school-aged girls in Niger were in class. Today, though significant cultural and religious opposition remains, nearly two-thirds of girls are enrolled in school.

“Back in 2003, we had only 15 girls at my school, out of 150 students. Now, we have 103 girls out of a total of 175 students,” said Ibrahim Sani, who has taught for 17 years in the town of Agadez, in the northern part of this West African country.

Between 2001 and 2011, Niger’s overall rate of enrolment for girls rose from 29 to 63 percent, according to the Ministry of Education. (via IPS – It Takes a Village to Educate a Girl | Inter Press Service)

[NIGER] The effect of food insecurity on children’s health is obvious; children, particularly those under age 5, are vulnerable to life-threatening malnutrition.
Less obvious is the devastating impact of the crisis on children’s education. When there is not enough to eat, school can quickly become an afterthought.
This is the scenario now facing countless families in the Sahel region of Africa, where a food crisis is looming. Particularly at risk are children in Mauritania, Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali, Chad and localized areas of Senegal. (via UNICEF - At a glance: Niger - Food shortages force children to drop out of school in Niger)

[NIGER] The effect of food insecurity on children’s health is obvious; children, particularly those under age 5, are vulnerable to life-threatening malnutrition.

Less obvious is the devastating impact of the crisis on children’s education. When there is not enough to eat, school can quickly become an afterthought.

This is the scenario now facing countless families in the Sahel region of Africa, where a food crisis is looming. Particularly at risk are children in Mauritania, Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali, Chad and localized areas of Senegal. (via UNICEF - At a glance: Niger - Food shortages force children to drop out of school in Niger)