Posts tagged Rwanda

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.
Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.
(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.

Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.

(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

Rwanda: New Curricula to Streamline Teaching of Genocide

The Ministry of Education is currently revising the curricula for schools at nursery, primary, and secondary levels, a process that will streamline how best to teach students about the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, among other changes.

Under the new curriculum, the teaching of Genocide will be reinforced, in line with Genocide prevention. Teaching the younger generations about the Genocide and Rwanda’s history is widely considered as a key element in cementing the on-going reconciliation efforts and ensuring sustainable unity of the Rwandan people.

(via AllAfrica.com)

“We don’t attend school,” says Yvette. “We wake up every morning, go to get clean and then go to pray. After that, I help my mother with lunch. We don’t have much else to do.”

UNICEF has partnered with Vision Jeunesse Nouvelle and Save the Children to provide organized recreational activities for children and youth at the transit centre. Child-friendly activities provide children with learning, play and entertainment activities. Such ‘child-friendly spaces’ are designed to serve as safe and protected spaces for children to be in times of emergency.

(via UNICEF - Rwanda - In Rwanda, helping Congolese refugee children be children again)

[RWANDA] On the outskirts of Rwanda’s capital, a UNICEF-supported child-friendly school is helping to transform the way girls access education.
Rubingo Primary School, in Gasabo District, is one of 75 schools in Rwanda being overhauled with UNICEF support to become ‘child-friendly’. Child-friendly schools take a holistic approach to improving education quality in schools, including refining teaching methods, improving school infrastructure, and making sure girls feel as welcome and comfortable as their boy classmates. (via UNGEI - Rwanda - A brighter future for Rwanda’s girls)

[RWANDA] On the outskirts of Rwanda’s capital, a UNICEF-supported child-friendly school is helping to transform the way girls access education.

Rubingo Primary School, in Gasabo District, is one of 75 schools in Rwanda being overhauled with UNICEF support to become ‘child-friendly’. Child-friendly schools take a holistic approach to improving education quality in schools, including refining teaching methods, improving school infrastructure, and making sure girls feel as welcome and comfortable as their boy classmates. (via UNGEI - Rwanda - A brighter future for Rwanda’s girls)

Rwandan youth speak out for inclusion and protection

Rwanda is planning to hire at least 4,000 teachers from the East African Community this month, opening an employment window for thousands of unemployed teachers in the region.


The move is part of plans to scale up the use of English as the language of instruction in schools as well as increase its use in the largely French-speaking economy, as it seeks opportunities in the integrated EAC where English is the formal language of communication.

[RWANDA] The Ministry of Education will recruit 4,000 teachers to teach in the English language in secondary schools, as part of its strategy to put the country at the same level with its EAC partners of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania in creating higher education and job opportunities.


In an exclusive interview with The New Times, the State Minister-in-charge of Primary and Secondary Education, Dr Mathias Harebamungu, said the recruitment will be done in January 2012 to coincide with the new academic year.

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

How can countries encourage girls to attend school? Is the answer providing free textbooks or building schools closer to their homes? While these are important pieces of the puzzle, there is another issue that influences whether girls attend school: menstruation.

According to the United Nations Children’s Fund, one in 10 African girls stays home during menses or drops out of school. In many cases, girls do not have access to affordable sanitary pads, and social taboos against discussing menstruation compound the problem.

The teachers’ welfare body, Umwalimu SACCO, has declared its plans to avail housing loans to thousands of its members across the country … The project is one of the measures being put in place to improve the standards of living among teachers. This, according to government, will in turn improve the quality of education in the country.