Posts tagged South Sudan

South Sudan: WFP Girls’ Ration Increases School Attendance

School officials in South Sudan say a monthly take-home food ration from the World Food Programme (WFP) has helped to reduce the number of female students dropping out of school.

[…] WFP supports girls through what is known as the “Girls’ Incentive,” which is designed to encourage girls’ enrolment in school and keep them attending class regularly.

[…] The girls from grades 3-8 who are allowed by their parents to attend classes for at least 20 out of 22 days in a school calendar month receive a 9.9 kilograms of cereal and 3.6 kilograms of vegetable oil. The food serves as an incentive to the parents, who generally prefer to send boys to school, while girls stay home to work, help their families with cooking or are married off early in exchange for bride-price. 

School officials in South Sudan say a monthly take-home food ration from the World Food Programme (WFP) has helped to reduce the number of female students dropping out of school.

[…]

The girls from grades 3-8 who are allowed by their parents to attend classes for at least 20 out of 22 days in a school calendar month receive a 9.9 kilograms of cereal and 3.6 kilograms of vegetable oil. The food serves as an incentive to the parents, who generally prefer to send boys to school, while girls stay home to work, help their families with cooking or are married off early in exchange for bride-price.

“We have witnessed a real increase in the number of girls that have enrolled and stayed in school since we started providing food through the (girls’) incentive,” says Lokang Augustine Okocha, the director of studies at Redeemed Generation Academy in Torit, the capital of Eastern Equatoria State.

[SOUTH SUDAN] Education is a key priority for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.
Sixty-four per cent of children aged 6 to 11 are out of school, and the primary school completion rate is only 10 per cent, among the lowest in the world.
Gender equality is also a huge challenge, with only 37 per cent of girls aged 6 to 13 attending school. Still, thanks to the efforts of dedicated teachers, accelerated learning programmes and children’s clubs, there have been encouraging developments in girls’ education over the past year. (via UNGEI - Republic of South Sudan - Prioritizing education and promoting gender equality in South Sudan)

[SOUTH SUDAN] Education is a key priority for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.

Sixty-four per cent of children aged 6 to 11 are out of school, and the primary school completion rate is only 10 per cent, among the lowest in the world.

Gender equality is also a huge challenge, with only 37 per cent of girls aged 6 to 13 attending school. Still, thanks to the efforts of dedicated teachers, accelerated learning programmes and children’s clubs, there have been encouraging developments in girls’ education over the past year. (via UNGEI - Republic of South Sudan - Prioritizing education and promoting gender equality in South Sudan)

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

UNICEF assists returnees to South Sudan with shelter, water and temporary learning facilities (by unicef)

A primary school becomes a model for increasing girls' enrolment

[WESTERN EQUATORIA, South Sudan] Access to education is one of the key priorities for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan. Seventy per cent of children aged 6 to 17 have never set foot in a classroom. The completion rate in primary schools is only 21 per cent, one of the lowest in the world.

Baya Primary School in Western Equatoria has become the envy of other schools in the state. The school is successfully using its own child clubs, not only to increase girls’ enrolment but also encourage dropouts to join the Accelerated Learning Programme (ALP).

South Sudan is to phase out Arabic as the language of instruction in schools within the next three years, an official said today. The minister for General Education, Joseph Ukel, said Arabic will be gradually replaced with English as the official medium of communication in schools and public offices as enshrined in the new country’s constitution.
29 October 2011 – The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) today welcomed the recently independent country of South Sudan — which has some of the worst indicators for education levels in the world — as its newest Member State.
In her welcome message UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova noted that the country of eight million people faces “immense challenges,” but pledged that the agency would support the nation to strengthen its education system and train teachers and other education professionals.
(via As South Sudan joins UNESCO, major challenges in education lie ahead)

29 October 2011 – The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) today welcomed the recently independent country of South Sudan — which has some of the worst indicators for education levels in the world — as its newest Member State.

In her welcome message UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova noted that the country of eight million people faces “immense challenges,” but pledged that the agency would support the nation to strengthen its education system and train teachers and other education professionals.

(via As South Sudan joins UNESCO, major challenges in education lie ahead)

Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni says his country will send teachers to South Sudan as an effort to help the new nation build its human capacity and recover from decades of conflict that have badly affected literacy and the education system.

Speaking at the opening of a leaders retreat for his ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) on Monday in the town of Kyanykwanzi, president Museveni said this will aid job creation for his citizens.

[SOUTH SUDAN] Although over one million primary-school age children are out of school and secondary education enrolment is one of the lowest in the world, South Sudan has also made progress in education since the peace settlement in 2005. The governments is initiating key reforms, notably standardizing the primary school curriculum and syllabus and rationalizing the public sector payroll.