Posts tagged Tanzania

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.
Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.
(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.

Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.

(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

The national government in Tanzania plans to hire and deploy over 28,000 teachers in primary and secondary schools starting in January 2013. This move should reduce, by more than half, the shortage of teaching staff in government schools. (via Education International - Tanzania: Significant move to curb teacher shortage)

The national government in Tanzania plans to hire and deploy over 28,000 teachers in primary and secondary schools starting in January 2013. This move should reduce, by more than half, the shortage of teaching staff in government schools. (via Education International - Tanzania: Significant move to curb teacher shortage)

Dar Es Salaam — Though children attending private schools have been found to perform better than those going to public schools, their performance was far from better, a survey by Uwezo East Africa has established. Surveys conducted in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda on quality of primary education showed that in Tanzania and Uganda, pupils attending private schools performed relatively poorly.

The ability of schools to retain students is wanting, however. East African governments must do more to close the huge gap between the access to primary education and that of secondary education.

Only 27 per cent of East Africa’s youth are enrolled in secondary school at the age group when they should be — compared with a sub-Saharan average of 34.1 per cent, and a world average of 67 per cent.

Looking at the statistics, an inverse relationship is observed between the percentage of government expenditure on education and the number of years a child is expected to survive in the school system.

The progress has come with a lesson in the law of unintended consequences. Enrolment has grown so fast in Tanzania that the school system is creaking with overcrowded classrooms, shortages of books, teachers and toilets, and reports of corporal punishment being used to keep order. In short, it seems that quality has been sacrificed for quantity. (via Midterm report: Tanzania’s educational revolution needs investment | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

The progress has come with a lesson in the law of unintended consequences. Enrolment has grown so fast in Tanzania that the school system is creaking with overcrowded classrooms, shortages of books, teachers and toilets, and reports of corporal punishment being used to keep order. In short, it seems that quality has been sacrificed for quantity. (via Midterm report: Tanzania’s educational revolution needs investment | Global development | guardian.co.uk)