Posts tagged UNICEF

Three years ago, after they had first fled to Damascus, Shaiima and her family then fled again, crossing the border into Lebanon after a harrowing journey. They set up what was supposed to be a short-term, alternative shelter amid some 15 tents.

Today, they are among 1,000 refugees living on this strip of muddy lowland next to a polluted stream, and the makeshift tent has become their home for an indeterminate future. 

[…] Children are now able to attend non-formal educational classes organized by local NGO Beyond Association, supported by UNICEF, right on the settlement. The child-friendly spaces provide basic literacy and numeracy classes, an accelerated learning programme, English lessons, psychosocial support and structured recreational activities for the refugee children. Some 400 children between the ages of 6 and 14 participate in either the morning or afternoon shifts. (via Refugee children determined to keep learning, as Syrian conflict reaches three-year mark | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)

Two months after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, schools officially reopened in the Philippines, a positive step towards recovery as families continue piecing their lives back together.

via Schools reopen in typhoon damaged areas of the Philippines (by UNICEF)

 

Before arriving at the Charahi Qambar camp for internally displaced people, 16-year-old Agha LaLay had never attended school. He didn’t know how to read, didn’t know how to write, and his math skills were nonexistent.

That was five years ago. His family, like many of the families here, fled their home in Helmand province to escape constant fighting. They joined thousands of other people living in this camp.

Although relatively peaceful, life here is difficult, too. LaLay lives in a small cluster of mud-brick buildings with 19 relatives. There is still no running water, no toilet, and no electricity. Food is always in short supply. Most of the adults can’t read or write.

Read more.

via Building a future: Education for conflict-displaced children in Afghanistan (by UNICEF)

In the Philippines, returning to school following Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

“I am happy to be back to school because my classmates survived,” says Alexa, 8.

In areas of the Philippines affected by the typhoon, about 90 per cent of school buildings were damaged – more than 3,200 schools in all – leaving over a million pupils and 34,000 teachers with no place for learning. In Leyte province alone, 760 schools were damaged. The Philippine Government, with the support of UNICEF and other partners, has worked to get children back to a normal schedule as quickly as possible, first with a ‘soft’ opening of schools in December, to be followed by a full reopening in January.

Read more here: UNICEF | Back on Track

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]
Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.
The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.
Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.
(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]

Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.

The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.

Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.

(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

A full courseload for pastoralist children in Somalia (by UNICEF)

Somali children who once would have bypassed schooling to herd their families’ animals are now busy studying, thanks to a programme focused on rural and pastoralist communities.

[…]

Since the programme began in March 2012, more than 3,000 children have been educated, according to Save the Children, which is implementing the UNICEF project.

Nearly 45 per cent of those children are girls – like 13-year-old Ayen Noor Mohamed, who attends Xareed Primary School in Somaliland.

See more at: Back on Track

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.
About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.
“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.

About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.

“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)

This year, on 11 October, the International Day of the Girl Child focuses on Innovating for Girls’ Education. The day provides a platform to highlight the continued importance of girls’ education as well as examples of successful, scalable and innovative approaches for tackling lingering challenges related to access, keeping girls in school and ensuring that their education is relevant and meaningful to their future.

(via UNICEF: Innovate to ensure all girls are educated for the twenty-first century)

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