Posts tagged Uganda

Teachers in many schools in Uganda are on strike this week as their salaries have not been paid since April. This present strike is separate from a strike which is planned for September if a 20% payrise which has long been promised is not forthcoming.
While not paying teachers a living wage - some teachers have actually had their salaries cut from $139 to $119 a month according to reports - the government is bringing in a new system whereby tenure is dependent on ‘performance.’ Teachers point out that this is an impossible situation when they are not being given the tools to do the job. (via Ugandan Teachers strike over unpaid Salaries | Teacher Solidarity)

Teachers in many schools in Uganda are on strike this week as their salaries have not been paid since April. This present strike is separate from a strike which is planned for September if a 20% payrise which has long been promised is not forthcoming.

While not paying teachers a living wage - some teachers have actually had their salaries cut from $139 to $119 a month according to reports - the government is bringing in a new system whereby tenure is dependent on ‘performance.’ Teachers point out that this is an impossible situation when they are not being given the tools to do the job. (via Ugandan Teachers strike over unpaid Salaries | Teacher Solidarity)

Improving Education in Uganda

Determined to improve an educational system beset by challenges, advocates recently launched Uganda’s first Quality Public Education Week. Talk shows, panel debates, exhibitions and rallies were held throughout the country April 22-26, 2013—a call for action from Ugandan decision-makers.

While public schools are available at no charge to Ugandan boys and girls ages 6 through 12, experts question the facilities’ quality and effectiveness. As youngsters age, drop out rates soar - as many as 66 percent leave, according to SC. An alarming 18 percent of those eligible do not attend school at all.


unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: 26 March 2012Uganda, 2007: Uganda’s northern districts continue to recover from two decades of armed conflict. Some 2 million people were displaced, and vital infrastructure was destroyed. In the area of education, UNICEF supports government efforts to enrol all eligible children. An abandoned school desk in a camp for people displaced by conflict, in the northern Gulu District.
©UNICEF/Roger LeMoyne
For more information, please visit: http://www.unicef.org

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: 26 March 2012
Uganda, 2007: Uganda’s northern districts continue to recover from two decades of armed conflict. Some 2 million people were displaced, and vital infrastructure was destroyed. In the area of education, UNICEF supports government efforts to enrol all eligible children. An abandoned school desk in a camp for people displaced by conflict, in the northern Gulu District.

©UNICEF/Roger LeMoyne

For more information, please visit: http://www.unicef.org

Teachers in Uganda are striking for a salary increase which will provide them with a living wage.


Teachers in Uganda earn as little as $96 a month under conditions where inflation is running at 20 %. The teachers – who are members of the union Ugandan National Teachers Association (UNATU) are demanding a 100% rise. Teachers are among the worst paid government employees in the country – yet Yoweri Museveni – President of Uganda since 1986 – says that an increase for teachers is not a priority. Instead the government is prioritising infrastructure which will allow it to become one of the world’s top 50 oil producers.

Uganda will introduce Kiswahili as a compulsory subject in primary and secondary schools this year as a way of integrating fully with the other EAC partner states.

Uganda joins Rwanda in the list of regional countries seeking to boost their language use as they seek opportunities in the integrated EAC where English and Swahili are the main languages of communication.

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Eight teachers tell us about the progress of education in their country, what they see as the biggest challenges for African teachers and students – and their hopes for the future (via Global development voices: Africa’s teachers | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni says his country will send teachers to South Sudan as an effort to help the new nation build its human capacity and recover from decades of conflict that have badly affected literacy and the education system.

Speaking at the opening of a leaders retreat for his ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) on Monday in the town of Kyanykwanzi, president Museveni said this will aid job creation for his citizens.

Ugandan children work with community leaders to end violence in schools (by unicef)

Washington (CNN) — Think of pop-tops, and a soda can might come to mind. But Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe sees pop-tops as a way to help hundreds of women in Gulu, Uganda, start a new life.
Nyirumbe sells women’s purses made out of the aluminum tabs, and so far she has sold more than 500 purses for about $3,000. All of the proceeds go to the people who made them — her students at the St. Monica’s Girls’ Tailoring Center.
Eight years ago, Nyirumbe started the school in Gulu to help poor young girls and women caught in the middle of the decades-long Ugandan civil war. Many of the women had become mothers after they were abducted and raped by rebels in the Lord’s Resistance Army.
Nyirumbe’s school feeds and rehabilitates more than 300 mothers and their babies each year. It also provides free medical care and teaches the mothers valuable life skills, such as sewing, cooking and cleaning. (via Pop-top purses helping Ugandan women start over - CNN.com)

Washington (CNN) — Think of pop-tops, and a soda can might come to mind. But Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe sees pop-tops as a way to help hundreds of women in Gulu, Uganda, start a new life.

Nyirumbe sells women’s purses made out of the aluminum tabs, and so far she has sold more than 500 purses for about $3,000. All of the proceeds go to the people who made them — her students at the St. Monica’s Girls’ Tailoring Center.

Eight years ago, Nyirumbe started the school in Gulu to help poor young girls and women caught in the middle of the decades-long Ugandan civil war. Many of the women had become mothers after they were abducted and raped by rebels in the Lord’s Resistance Army.

Nyirumbe’s school feeds and rehabilitates more than 300 mothers and their babies each year. It also provides free medical care and teaches the mothers valuable life skills, such as sewing, cooking and cleaning. (via Pop-top purses helping Ugandan women start over - CNN.com)

CNN

It is hard for pupils in poor rural Ugandan schools to pursue their dreams, but it is harder still for those in community schools such as Amorikot. At the start of the Katine project, Amorikot was about the poorest school you could find – a collection of leaky, gaping, grass huts for classrooms, and offices manned largely by unqualified teachers. But, as part of the project, Amref built modern classrooms and latrines. Yet because it is a community – as opposed to a government-aided – school, Amorikot has struggled without trained teachers or state grants, and with dwindling fee payments from parents. (via Education in Katine | Richard M Kavuma | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

It is hard for pupils in poor rural Ugandan schools to pursue their dreams, but it is harder still for those in community schools such as Amorikot. At the start of the Katine project, Amorikot was about the poorest school you could find – a collection of leaky, gaping, grass huts for classrooms, and offices manned largely by unqualified teachers. But, as part of the project, Amref built modern classrooms and latrines. Yet because it is a community – as opposed to a government-aided – school, Amorikot has struggled without trained teachers or state grants, and with dwindling fee payments from parents. (via Education in Katine | Richard M Kavuma | Global development | guardian.co.uk)