Posts tagged WFP

According to the research, around 368 million children – about one out of every five – get a meal at school every day in 169 developing and developed countries. Global investment in these programmes is about US$75 billion, with most coming from government budgets.
Yet despite the global nature of school feeding, the coverage of these programmes is lowest where they are most needed. In low-income countries, where children are most likely to be poor and hungry, only 18 percent receive a daily meal at school, compared to nearly 49 percent of children in middle-income countries. (via School Feeding Crucial In Crisis Times, Yet The Most Needy Still Miss Out, New Report Finds | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide)

According to the research, around 368 million children – about one out of every five – get a meal at school every day in 169 developing and developed countries. Global investment in these programmes is about US$75 billion, with most coming from government budgets.

Yet despite the global nature of school feeding, the coverage of these programmes is lowest where they are most needed. In low-income countries, where children are most likely to be poor and hungry, only 18 percent receive a daily meal at school, compared to nearly 49 percent of children in middle-income countries. (via School Feeding Crucial In Crisis Times, Yet The Most Needy Still Miss Out, New Report Finds | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide)

South Sudan: WFP Girls’ Ration Increases School Attendance

School officials in South Sudan say a monthly take-home food ration from the World Food Programme (WFP) has helped to reduce the number of female students dropping out of school.

[…] WFP supports girls through what is known as the “Girls’ Incentive,” which is designed to encourage girls’ enrolment in school and keep them attending class regularly.

[…] The girls from grades 3-8 who are allowed by their parents to attend classes for at least 20 out of 22 days in a school calendar month receive a 9.9 kilograms of cereal and 3.6 kilograms of vegetable oil. The food serves as an incentive to the parents, who generally prefer to send boys to school, while girls stay home to work, help their families with cooking or are married off early in exchange for bride-price. 

School officials in South Sudan say a monthly take-home food ration from the World Food Programme (WFP) has helped to reduce the number of female students dropping out of school.

[…]

The girls from grades 3-8 who are allowed by their parents to attend classes for at least 20 out of 22 days in a school calendar month receive a 9.9 kilograms of cereal and 3.6 kilograms of vegetable oil. The food serves as an incentive to the parents, who generally prefer to send boys to school, while girls stay home to work, help their families with cooking or are married off early in exchange for bride-price.

“We have witnessed a real increase in the number of girls that have enrolled and stayed in school since we started providing food through the (girls’) incentive,” says Lokang Augustine Okocha, the director of studies at Redeemed Generation Academy in Torit, the capital of Eastern Equatoria State.

Sahel Food Crisis: School Meals Needed in Chad as Hunger Deepens

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is providing school feeding in Chad as part of its response to the crisis.

These meals not only save children from hunger but also keep them in school and learning.

When a hunger crisis hits a community, children often drop out of school to help earn wages for the family. This negative coping strategy denies children education and may even put them in danger.

A total of 129 Senor High School girls, from the three Northern Regions, are to benefit from a GHc 74,000 scholarship scheme to guard against school drop-out.

The World Food Programme and the Ghana Health Service Girls Project seek to support the less privileged girls, who attained the aggregate 06 to 16 in the 2010 Basic Education Certificate Examination.

Nyipher used to struggle in school. She had trouble paying attention and she’d fall asleep in class. A 14-year-old girl growing up in the slums of Nairobi, her problem wasn’t laziness—it was hunger. Then her school started serving meals at lunch and things began to change. Now, she’s thinking about college and beyond.

Kenya: School Meals Help Girl Rise To Top Of Class | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide

Fifteen year old Eliza Sabolo remembers a time when she went without food for two days because there was nothing to eat at home. However, this changed four years ago when she began receiving food at school under the World Food Programme (WFP) School Meals Programme.

UN agency calls for more support for its school feeding programmes

Nancy Walters, the chief of school feeding policy at WFP, told a New York forum on hunger that the programmes have many benefits beyond the immediate goal of ensuring children do not go hungry. They help children stay in class, reduce levels of diseases and other health problems, empower girls, lift education standards and free many youngsters from having to work.

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Commissioned by WFP’s Office of Evaluation, Finan and his team surveyed the families of 1,352 children in 68 different schools across the country, in both rural Kenya and the city slums of Nairobi. They found that enrolment rates in schools with meals were an average 28% higher than at those without, confirming the power of food as a magnet to classrooms. School meals were also found to keep kids coming back, with attendance rates an average of 5% higher for boys and as much as 10% higher for girls. In addition, the study showed that school lunches encouraged parents to leave their children at school for the entire day, freeing up time that nearly a third of families used to earn income. Overall, children fed at school were more likely to continue studying after grade 8 by 4% among girls and 12% among boys. While girls with school meals finished elementary school at a rate 11% higher than those without, the study registered stubbornly high drop-out rates among female teens in both groups.
(via Kenya: School Meals Graduates Pass Down Rewards | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide)

Commissioned by WFP’s Office of Evaluation, Finan and his team surveyed the families of 1,352 children in 68 different schools across the country, in both rural Kenya and the city slums of Nairobi. They found that enrolment rates in schools with meals were an average 28% higher than at those without, confirming the power of food as a magnet to classrooms. School meals were also found to keep kids coming back, with attendance rates an average of 5% higher for boys and as much as 10% higher for girls. In addition, the study showed that school lunches encouraged parents to leave their children at school for the entire day, freeing up time that nearly a third of families used to earn income. Overall, children fed at school were more likely to continue studying after grade 8 by 4% among girls and 12% among boys. While girls with school meals finished elementary school at a rate 11% higher than those without, the study registered stubbornly high drop-out rates among female teens in both groups.

(via Kenya: School Meals Graduates Pass Down Rewards | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide)