Posts tagged child labour

[SIERRA LEONE] Thousands of children in Sierra Leone are paying for their own education or helping their families make ends meet by working as rock-breakers for the country’s construction industry.
Child labour is nothing new in Sierra Leone, but the brutal job of breaking stones with a hammer for hours on end in the baking heat has raised particular concern.
[…]
Education and child labour are often closely entwined in Sierra Leone, where schooling can impose a severe financial strain. Although primary education is nominally free, parents must pay for uniforms, books, pens, transport and in some cases contributions to teachers’ salaries. To send their children to school, therefore, many parents must also send them to work. (via IRIN Africa | SLIDESHOW: Children break rocks to pay for school in Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Children | Economy | Education)

[SIERRA LEONE] Thousands of children in Sierra Leone are paying for their own education or helping their families make ends meet by working as rock-breakers for the country’s construction industry.

Child labour is nothing new in Sierra Leone, but the brutal job of breaking stones with a hammer for hours on end in the baking heat has raised particular concern.

[…]

Education and child labour are often closely entwined in Sierra Leone, where schooling can impose a severe financial strain. Although primary education is nominally free, parents must pay for uniforms, books, pens, transport and in some cases contributions to teachers’ salaries. To send their children to school, therefore, many parents must also send them to work. (via IRIN Africa | SLIDESHOW: Children break rocks to pay for school in Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Children | Economy | Education)

Like many Liberians, Mercy Womeh missed several years of education as a result of the 14-year civil war. She is now 18 and determined to complete her final two years of schooling. To fund her education, she crushes rocks. On a good day, she fills as many as seven buckets with stones, selling them to pay her school fees (via Between a rock and a hard place: Mercy Womeh’s struggle to fund an education in postwar Liberia – in pictures | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Like many Liberians, Mercy Womeh missed several years of education as a result of the 14-year civil war. She is now 18 and determined to complete her final two years of schooling. To fund her education, she crushes rocks. On a good day, she fills as many as seven buckets with stones, selling them to pay her school fees (via Between a rock and a hard place: Mercy Womeh’s struggle to fund an education in postwar Liberia – in pictures | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

Uganda: School Children Demand an End to Child Labour

School children have asked government to explain its commitment to end rampant child labour in the country. The children, in both primary and secondary schools, said despite several efforts and the laws in place, child labour has persisted, thereby posing dangers to their growth and health. “We are always abused. Is it right for children to work in construction companies? What solution do you have for those who employ children in bars and other places and what is government doing to such entrepreneurs?” Hamidu Kamoga, a secondary school student from Comprehensive College, Kitetikka in Wakiso District said.

This paper aims to begin to fill in the gap about the possible role of school quality in affecting household decisions relative to children’s work and school attendance […] Our findings suggest that school quality matters for working children: better schools do reduce participation to economic activities and increase school attendance.
Does school quality matter for working children? (via Zunia.org)