Posts tagged children

Three years ago, after they had first fled to Damascus, Shaiima and her family then fled again, crossing the border into Lebanon after a harrowing journey. They set up what was supposed to be a short-term, alternative shelter amid some 15 tents.

Today, they are among 1,000 refugees living on this strip of muddy lowland next to a polluted stream, and the makeshift tent has become their home for an indeterminate future. 

[…] Children are now able to attend non-formal educational classes organized by local NGO Beyond Association, supported by UNICEF, right on the settlement. The child-friendly spaces provide basic literacy and numeracy classes, an accelerated learning programme, English lessons, psychosocial support and structured recreational activities for the refugee children. Some 400 children between the ages of 6 and 14 participate in either the morning or afternoon shifts. (via Refugee children determined to keep learning, as Syrian conflict reaches three-year mark | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.
Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life
(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.

Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life

(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

Despite high enrolment rates, many children in the region of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/CIS), are missing out on education.

According to the latest study published by the Out-of-School Children Initiative, 2.5 million children of basic school age and 1.6 million children of pre-primary school age are missing out on school due to a serious shortage of services and facilities.

Children in poor regions and rural areas, children with the lowest socioeconomic backgrounds, working children and children in conflict with the law often benefit least from education. Additionally, many more children from the most marginalized communities are excluded from national data collection procedures and thus are invisible.

(via Including all children in quality learning – new report on Out-of-School Children | Back on Track)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.
Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.
The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.
(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.

Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.

The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.

(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]
Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.
The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.
Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.
(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]

Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.

The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.

Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.

(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013

I’ve always looked at Nelson Mandela as a great teacher. This short video beautifully encapsulates his thoughts on children and education.

The names of Nelson Mandela (by UNICEF)

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?