Posts tagged classrooms

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.
The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.

The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)

[Philippines] Classroom shortage puts 10,000 students on home study

As students and teachers again face a shortage of classrooms this year, one of the country’s most populated school divisions is turning to home schooling to ease overcrowding.

The Quezon City school division is placing some 10,000 students from six high schools on a home schooling program, the biggest number to be covered in a single area since the Department of Education adopted this alternative mode of teaching.

“There are 10,000 students from six high schools that will go on home study. Our city government has already allocated P20 million for that,” said assistant division superintendent Rowena Cacanindin.

Teacher exchange for a 21st century education

This past year, we have had the privilege of working side by side with teachers and school administrators in the United States and the Primorsky Krai region of Far East Russia to examine effective ways to help teachers bring international learning experiences into their teaching, enriching learning in K-12 classrooms here and in Russia. A primary goal has been to support both U.S. and Russian teachers to develop new approaches that extend beyond the scope of their immediate classroom and develop ways to incorporate a more international focus in their work with students.

“You can’t compare what we have now with how it used to be. Now we have good space for the children to learn, we have classrooms and furniture, toilets and hand-washing facilities.” says Mr. Odol.
There are now 305 children – 234 of them girls – enrolled at the small school. It runs two shifts, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon, to accommodate the increasing number of students. The effect has been startling.
“Children are learning better now. We have a better environment and enrolment has doubled because children prefer to spend their time in school,” says Mr. Odol. (via In Somalia, UNICEF constructs classrooms and trains teachers for children displaced by conflict | Back on Track)

“You can’t compare what we have now with how it used to be. Now we have good space for the children to learn, we have classrooms and furniture, toilets and hand-washing facilities.” says Mr. Odol.

There are now 305 children – 234 of them girls – enrolled at the small school. It runs two shifts, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon, to accommodate the increasing number of students. The effect has been startling.

“Children are learning better now. We have a better environment and enrolment has doubled because children prefer to spend their time in school,” says Mr. Odol. (via In Somalia, UNICEF constructs classrooms and trains teachers for children displaced by conflict | Back on Track)

In the midst of the most abject poverty, parents have come together to build makeshift classrooms, hire a teacher, and buy a blackboard. Many of the kids work in the afternoon, selling charcoal to pay the $1 fee charged every term.
“Being in school is fun – and people with an education can have a better life. I’ll be a doctor,” says David Ichange, aged 12. (via Aid donors get an F for education « World Education Blog)

In the midst of the most abject poverty, parents have come together to build makeshift classrooms, hire a teacher, and buy a blackboard. Many of the kids work in the afternoon, selling charcoal to pay the $1 fee charged every term.

“Being in school is fun – and people with an education can have a better life. I’ll be a doctor,” says David Ichange, aged 12. (via Aid donors get an F for education « World Education Blog)

After dropping for decades, average class sizes in American schools may be growing again as schools cope with budget shortfalls.

Although some educators see the rising numbers as a worrisome trend, others see an opportunity for innovation.

“Yes, small class sizes do help, but it’s not the only way. What we need to focus on is how schools are becoming more flexible to meet the different needs of kids,” said Thomas Starratt, the principal of Boynton Middle School in New Ipswich, N.H., where the average class size at the school has crept up from 18 to 22 since the recent economic recession took its toll.

"Teachers are supposed to be innovative," says Abdi Salat of Garissa  district’s education office.
"The teacher has to use goat  droppings and wild fruits and all these things at his disposal as his  teaching aids."
Herding livestock is the daily activity for  children in these nomadic pastoralist communities.
For that  reason hundreds of thousands of Kenyan children are missing out on an  entire education.
Now there are efforts to change that: If the  children cannot go to the schools, then take the schools to the  children.
"I really enjoy this job as I am from the same community and I want  to help these children," says Mr Farah, who teaches a total of 57  students - two-thirds of them boys.
"If it was not for me they  would not have gone to school."
(via BBC News - Taking the school to Kenya’s nomads)

"Teachers are supposed to be innovative," says Abdi Salat of Garissa district’s education office.

"The teacher has to use goat droppings and wild fruits and all these things at his disposal as his teaching aids."

Herding livestock is the daily activity for children in these nomadic pastoralist communities.

For that reason hundreds of thousands of Kenyan children are missing out on an entire education.

Now there are efforts to change that: If the children cannot go to the schools, then take the schools to the children.

"I really enjoy this job as I am from the same community and I want to help these children," says Mr Farah, who teaches a total of 57 students - two-thirds of them boys.

"If it was not for me they would not have gone to school."

(via BBC News - Taking the school to Kenya’s nomads)

BBC

Multi-grade Teacher Training Initiative in Africa

"Multi-grade education - a method where a teacher instructs pupils of different ages in one classroom - is a reality in most African countries. But the quality of education has been poor because teachers’ vocational training is only focused on single grade instruction.

An Africa-wide initiative that encourages governments to make multi-grade education national policy, backed by sufficient educational budgets, adjusted curricula and teacher training, now wants to change this.”

"There is critical need for decent classrooms at two elementary schools in Bulape. Typically, rural Congolese schools poorly constructed. The classrooms are made from sticks and mud with thatched roof." (via Ending Extreme Poverty in the Congo: Rural Congolese Schools Are In Poor Shape)

"There is critical need for decent classrooms at two elementary schools in Bulape. Typically, rural Congolese schools poorly constructed. The classrooms are made from sticks and mud with thatched roof." (via Ending Extreme Poverty in the Congo: Rural Congolese Schools Are In Poor Shape)