Posts tagged curriculum

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.
[…]
The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.
Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.

[…]

The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.

Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

[South Korea] The National Assembly on Thursday passed a bill that aims to prevent Korean students from taking school courses beyond their regular academic schedule.

Rep. Kang Eun-hee of the Saenuri Party, who proposed the bill with Rep. Lee Sang-min of the Democratic Party, said Korean students are often forced to study subjects for subsequent semesters in advance at school or private institutes, known as hagwon. The widespread practice, even involving elementary school students, is meant to boost their chances for admission to elite schools.

The excessive competition leads to more difficult entrance exams by higher level education institutes, which in turn pushes students to study more courses in advance. Rep. Kang said the practice is a main factor driving up the already heated private education system in Korea, spawning a profitable market valued at 19.4 trillion won ($17.9 billion) per year.

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory
The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.
The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.
“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.
The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.
The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.
(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

Teaching Manuals Modified to Describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s Territory

The education ministry said Jan. 28 it has revised practice manuals for school curriculum guidelines to underscore the government’s position that the disputed Senkaku Islands and the Takeshima islets are integral parts of Japan’s territory.

The practice manuals are for junior and senior high school teachers. They are used in textbook screening and deciding how to instruct students at schools.

“As we are striving to develop human resources who can do well globally, it is only natural to teach students about our territories in a correct manner,” education minister Hakubun Shimomura said at a news conference the same day.

The uninhabited Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China, while the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan are administered by South Korea despite Tokyo’s claim that they are inherently Japanese territory.

The announcement will inevitably spark a backlash from Beijing and Seoul.

(via Teaching manuals modified to describe Senkakus, Takeshima as Japan’s territory - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun)

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum
Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.
Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.
“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.
via Taipei Times

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum

Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.

Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.

“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.

via Taipei Times

School textbooks rewritten after regime changes

  • Cairo: It is a small photograph of a young man on a page in an Egyptian primary-school textbook. But to many watching closely, it is a big step for education in the Arab world.
  • Khalid Saeed was the 28-year-old Egyptian computer programmer dragged out of an Internet café and beaten to death by Alexandria police after he posted a video of two of them allegedly divvying up drug money after a bust.
  • The Facebook page commemorating his life and expressing outrage over his 2010 death eventually mushroomed into the movement that overthrew president Hosni Mubarak.
  • Khalid Saeed’s story will be taught to all second-graders (seven and eight-year-olds) in Egypt, marking a modest attempt at curriculum reform in an otherwise stodgy educational system.

[ISRAEL] Education minister drops standardized tests

Education Minister Shai Piron announced the cancellation of national standardized tests (NST) in the upcoming school year.

The reason given for the decision was that the release of the test results to the public exerted undue pressure on students, raised concerns as to the tests’ integrity and harmed teachers’ motivation.

"The standardized tests are important and valuable evaluation tools, which we should continue to use in the future, however they cannot be carried on with in their present format," said Minister Piron. "The current form of the tests harms schools, teachers and students," he added.

Deafblindness is a minority disability and in Kenya, only 10 specialist facilities exist.
Over the next few months a new curriculum will be rolled out in Kenya's 10 deafblind education units in specialist schools. This is a result of a partnership between Sense International Kenya and the Kenyan Institute for Education (KIE) that we hope will result in a much improved standard of education for deafblind children in the country.
(via Developing the first deafblind curriculum in Kenya | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Deafblindness is a minority disability and in Kenya, only 10 specialist facilities exist.

Over the next few months a new curriculum will be rolled out in Kenya's 10 deafblind education units in specialist schools. This is a result of a partnership between Sense International Kenya and the Kenyan Institute for Education (KIE) that we hope will result in a much improved standard of education for deafblind children in the country.

(via Developing the first deafblind curriculum in Kenya | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall. 
For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.
On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall.

For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.

On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

CNN

PAKISTAN: Study reflects school textbooks need to be free of religious discrimination

The study found that 22 school textbooks contain discriminatory material towards minorities and other countries, as well as making insulting remarks against minority religions and including distorted historical facts.

A joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training has welcomed the plan by the Department of Basic Education to incrementally implement the use of African languages in all South African schools.
According to the Department of Basic Education, the programme will be implemented as from 2014 for Grade R and Grade 1. This will incrementally increase to include Grade 12 by 2025. The language selection for First Additional Language (FAL) would be Xitsonga, any Nguni language, a Sotho language, Tshivenda or Afrikaans. (via Parliament welcomes use of African languages in all schools (English))

A joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training has welcomed the plan by the Department of Basic Education to incrementally implement the use of African languages in all South African schools.

According to the Department of Basic Education, the programme will be implemented as from 2014 for Grade R and Grade 1. This will incrementally increase to include Grade 12 by 2025. The language selection for First Additional Language (FAL) would be Xitsonga, any Nguni language, a Sotho language, Tshivenda or Afrikaans. (via Parliament welcomes use of African languages in all schools (English))