Posts tagged disabilities

Deafblindness is a minority disability and in Kenya, only 10 specialist facilities exist.
Over the next few months a new curriculum will be rolled out in Kenya's 10 deafblind education units in specialist schools. This is a result of a partnership between Sense International Kenya and the Kenyan Institute for Education (KIE) that we hope will result in a much improved standard of education for deafblind children in the country.
(via Developing the first deafblind curriculum in Kenya | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Deafblindness is a minority disability and in Kenya, only 10 specialist facilities exist.

Over the next few months a new curriculum will be rolled out in Kenya's 10 deafblind education units in specialist schools. This is a result of a partnership between Sense International Kenya and the Kenyan Institute for Education (KIE) that we hope will result in a much improved standard of education for deafblind children in the country.

(via Developing the first deafblind curriculum in Kenya | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.
(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.

(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

In Madagascar, more than a million children are not in school. There are many reasons behind school exclusion, but children with disabilities, like Clarisse, are particularly marginalized – only 11 per cent of children with disabilities are enrolled in school.

Since 2008, UNICEF Madagascar has supported a variety of activities to bring children back to school. UNICEF Education Officer Minako Morimoto explains the approach of inclusive education: “It consists of giving each child access to elementary-level schooling and keeping them in the system to complete the education cycle.”

Teachers also receive training specifically for working in an inclusive environment.

In Madagascar, a process was initiated for pupils and their parents to identify neighbourhood children who should be integrated into the school system. Pupils were asked to draw a ’map of exclusion’ of their village, while parents discussed measures to bring excluded children back to school.

(via UNICEF - Madagascar - In Madagascar, ‘back to school’ means including those left out)

2 Lives:2 Miles Apart // School (by unicef)

All children have a right to patient teachers, meaningful participation, and inclusive education.

Laura and Carlos, two teenagers with disabilities from Mozambique, discuss their experiences at school.

2 Lives: 2 Miles Apart is a series of short films that highlights crucial issues impacting children. “Children with disabilities” is the title of this year’s “The State of the World’s Children" report, released by UNICEF.

unicef:

Mali: School of Hope
It’s been almost 10 years since teachers searched the streets of Bamako, Mali for hearing-impaired children, 19 of whom would be their first pupils. Today, the School of Hope is ensuring that its 160 pupils have an education – and a role at the centre of their families.

It is estimated that 90 per cent of the pupils at the School of Hope are survivors of meningitis – an inflammation of the protective membranes of the spine and brain.

In 2011, UNICEF reached nearly 11 million Malians under the age of 29 through an aggressive meningitis vaccination campaign.

Like all children, those with disabilities have many abilities, but are often excluded from society by discrimination and lack of support, leaving them among the most invisible and vulnerable children in the world.

On 30 May, UNICEF launched its flagship report The State of the World’s Children 2013: Children with Disabilities. The report brings global attention to the urgent needs of a largely invisible population.

Read more: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/mali_69546.html

In Mongolia, centre helps children with disabilities learn new skills

Like all children, those with disabilities have many abilities, but are often excluded from society by discrimination and lack of support, leaving them among the most invisible and vulnerable children in the world.

In northern Mongolia, a centre supporting children with disabilities has proven a lifeline for 13-year-old Uyanga.

(by unicef)

Also see here.

[AUSTRALIA] ALMOST $48 million of federal money to help children with disabilities in NSW schools will be spent on teacher training, the Premier, Barry O’Farrell, said.

The money is part of a $200 million program to improve resources for disabled students announced in the federal budget last year, the Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, said yesterday.

Under the agreement, which NSW is the first state to sign, the money can be spent on technical aids, teacher training or additional staff.

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

unicef:

Children with disabilities are routinely denied equal access to health, education and social services. They are also often excluded from opportunities to participate in their families and communities, and are at higher risk of violence and abuse.

UNICEF is collaborating with the Special Olympics to promote equal opportunities for these children and help them reach their full potential.

Watch this video to learn more.

 (by unicef)

What would you do with $3000 and the mandate to do something that benefits your community?
Aliya Zholboldina, an alumna of the Edmund S. Muskie Graduate Fellowship Program,  recently made use of the Muskie and UGRAD Alumni Small Grants program  to design and implement an art therapy program for children with  disabilities in Kazakhstan. The project brought professional art  teachers from Almaty, Kazakhstan’s capitol, to an orphanage in nearby  Talgar for a series of workshops held two times a week for six months.
(via Art Therapy for Children with Disabilities in Kazakhstan | IREX)

What would you do with $3000 and the mandate to do something that benefits your community?

Aliya Zholboldina, an alumna of the Edmund S. Muskie Graduate Fellowship Program, recently made use of the Muskie and UGRAD Alumni Small Grants program to design and implement an art therapy program for children with disabilities in Kazakhstan. The project brought professional art teachers from Almaty, Kazakhstan’s capitol, to an orphanage in nearby Talgar for a series of workshops held two times a week for six months.

(via Art Therapy for Children with Disabilities in Kazakhstan | IREX)