Posts tagged drought

Parts of Ethiopia are still reeling from the effects of recent drought, flooding, conflict or a combination of the three, resulting in increased numbers of children dropping out of school, say officials.
(via IRIN Africa | ETHIOPIA: Drought, floods hit education | Ethiopia | Children | Education | Environment)

Parts of Ethiopia are still reeling from the effects of recent drought, flooding, conflict or a combination of the three, resulting in increased numbers of children dropping out of school, say officials.

(via IRIN Africa | ETHIOPIA: Drought, floods hit education | Ethiopia | Children | Education | Environment)

[ETHIOPIA] Parts of Ethiopia are still reeling from the effects of recent drought, flooding, conflict or a combination of the three, resulting in increased numbers of children dropping out of school, say officials. At least 385,000 school-children need “emergency education assistance this school year”, Alexandra Westerbeek, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) communication manager in Ethiopia, told IRIN. “In addition, 70,000 children among [the] refugee population also need emergency education assistance.”

[KENYA] Here in Wajir, in the drought-ravaged north east of Kenya, Ali and his family live in a camp mostly populated by other displaced families like his own.

[…]

Trying to get an education had already been a struggle – now it’s a monumental challenge. Sharing a simple hut made of branches and straw with the rest of the family, Ali is forced to do his homework by flashlight.

(via unicef)

[SOMALIA] For many children in Somalia, the arrival of September meant the start of a new school year. But, for a huge number of children, school remains inaccessible. In South Central Somalia, an estimated 1.8 million children aged between 5 and 17 have been out of school. This number looks set to grow even bigger with the influx of internally displaced people caused by the country’s food crisis.

[KENYA] Back to School in Dadaab, Where Students Encounter Rules

Fleeing from drought or violence leaves children with a legacy that doesn’t always make them good students, says Kaissa.

“They are not used to rules,” he says. “They come to school today, but maybe they don’t come tomorrow.” To prove his point, only the most serious students attended school on the first day of term. It would take the rest of the week for the others to take their place in class.

“When I came to this school last year, we had 560 students. But now, there are more than 1,400,” says Mr. Hussein. “Most of the new arrivals are coming from rural communities, where they have been forced out by the drought. They have lost all their livestock, everything, and we cannot just turn them away.”
(via UNGEI - Kenya - Kenyan schools struggle to cope with influx of children displaced by drought)

“When I came to this school last year, we had 560 students. But now, there are more than 1,400,” says Mr. Hussein. “Most of the new arrivals are coming from rural communities, where they have been forced out by the drought. They have lost all their livestock, everything, and we cannot just turn them away.”

(via UNGEI - Kenya - Kenyan schools struggle to cope with influx of children displaced by drought)

Children attend a hygiene education class as part of a UNICEF-supported program
unicef:

Image from the Horn of Africa: 
Children attend a hygiene education class that is part of a UNICEF-supported WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) programme, in a primary school in Naros Village, near the town of Lodwar, capital of Turkana District, in Rift Valley Province. In this predominantly pastoralist region, many families are selling their livestock to buy increasingly expensive food.
Kenya, July 2011: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1118/Kate Holt
The Horn of Africa’s children need our help. You can join UNICEF’s effort by visiting: http://bit.ly/o55Nll
You can receive more UNICEF photos from the Horn of Africa on your iPhone by visiting: http://bit.ly/nWsSp2
Or…visit us at: http://www.unicef.org/phot​​​ography
In mid-July 2011, the crisis in the Horn of Africa – affecting Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Uganda – continues, with a worsening drought, rising food prices and the persistent conflict in Somalia. More than 10 million people are threatened by the worst drought in the region in 60 years. Somalia faces one of the world’s most severe food security crises as it continues to endure an extended humanitarian emergency, with tens of thousands fleeing into Kenya and Ethiopia. More than 10,000 Somalis a week are now arriving in the Dadaab camps in eastern Kenya, where aid partners are struggling to meet the needs of some 360,000 people in facilities meant for 90,000. In drought-affected areas of Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti, up to 500,000 severely malnourished children are at risk of dying, while a further 1.6 million moderately malnourished children and the wider-affected population are at high risk of disease. In northern Kenya, more than 25 per cent of children suffer from global acute malnutrition – in Turkana District the rate is at 37.4 per cent, its highest ever. UNICEF, together with government, UN, NGO and community partners, is supporting a range of interventions and essential services, especially for the displaced and for refugees, including feeding programmes, immunization campaigns, health outreach, and increased access to safe water and improvements to sanitation. UNICEF is seeking US $31.8 million for the next three months to provide humanitarian assistance for children and women in the four most affected countries.

Children attend a hygiene education class as part of a UNICEF-supported program

unicef:

Image from the Horn of Africa:

Children attend a hygiene education class that is part of a UNICEF-supported WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) programme, in a primary school in Naros Village, near the town of Lodwar, capital of Turkana District, in Rift Valley Province. In this predominantly pastoralist region, many families are selling their livestock to buy increasingly expensive food.

Kenya, July 2011: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1118/Kate Holt

The Horn of Africa’s children need our help. You can join UNICEF’s effort by visiting: http://bit.ly/o55Nll

You can receive more UNICEF photos from the Horn of Africa on your iPhone by visiting: http://bit.ly/nWsSp2

Or…visit us at: http://www.unicef.org/phot​​​ography

In mid-July 2011, the crisis in the Horn of Africa – affecting Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Uganda – continues, with a worsening drought, rising food prices and the persistent conflict in Somalia. More than 10 million people are threatened by the worst drought in the region in 60 years. Somalia faces one of the world’s most severe food security crises as it continues to endure an extended humanitarian emergency, with tens of thousands fleeing into Kenya and Ethiopia. More than 10,000 Somalis a week are now arriving in the Dadaab camps in eastern Kenya, where aid partners are struggling to meet the needs of some 360,000 people in facilities meant for 90,000. In drought-affected areas of Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti, up to 500,000 severely malnourished children are at risk of dying, while a further 1.6 million moderately malnourished children and the wider-affected population are at high risk of disease. In northern Kenya, more than 25 per cent of children suffer from global acute malnutrition – in Turkana District the rate is at 37.4 per cent, its highest ever. UNICEF, together with government, UN, NGO and community partners, is supporting a range of interventions and essential services, especially for the displaced and for refugees, including feeding programmes, immunization campaigns, health outreach, and increased access to safe water and improvements to sanitation. UNICEF is seeking US $31.8 million for the next three months to provide humanitarian assistance for children and women in the four most affected countries.

A drought in Kenya has hurt enrollment at schools for the start of New Year’s classes. Families who need green grass for their livestock to graze upon have moved away from the drought areas. A school district in the driest parts of the country have as many as 1000 children who will not be able to show up for school. Meanwhile, the districts in Southern Ethiopia that have more water will see a strain on their resources as the new children arrive.