Posts tagged education under attack

Lattakia/Damascus, 7 October 2014 – As part of the ‘Back to Learning’ campaign underway in Syria, hundreds of displaced children at a Lattakia shelter school have received UNICEF school bags filled with stationery supplies.
Each of the blue school bags contain basic stationery supplies that facilitate children’s learning including coloured pencils, notebooks, pencils, pens, erasers, rulers, protractors and a pencil case.
9-year old Nooran, who was displaced from Aleppo and missed two years of school, proudly shows her new school bag: “I am happy to be back at school. I am happy that my dad enrolled me back in school. I’ve been coming every day and now I am so happy to have all these pens and notebooks because I love to learn.”
(via “I am so happy to have these pens and bags – I love to learn” | #ChildrenofSyria)

Lattakia/Damascus, 7 October 2014 – As part of the ‘Back to Learning’ campaign underway in Syria, hundreds of displaced children at a Lattakia shelter school have received UNICEF school bags filled with stationery supplies.

Each of the blue school bags contain basic stationery supplies that facilitate children’s learning including coloured pencils, notebooks, pencils, pens, erasers, rulers, protractors and a pencil case.

9-year old Nooran, who was displaced from Aleppo and missed two years of school, proudly shows her new school bag: “I am happy to be back at school. I am happy that my dad enrolled me back in school. I’ve been coming every day and now I am so happy to have all these pens and notebooks because I love to learn.”

(via “I am so happy to have these pens and bags – I love to learn” | #ChildrenofSyria)

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.
Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.
… almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.
(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.

Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.

almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.

(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

"This is why I am here, so that I can study."

Almost two thirds of all schools in the Central African Republic remain closed because of ongoing conflict in the country, but UNICEF and partners have built 144 temporary learning spaces that are serving nearly 23,600 displaced children across the country.

“Me, what I want to do — I want to work so that my mother and father can eat and for Mother’s Day and Father’s Day we can celebrate them together. That’s why I want to study,” says Nicolette

Playfulness masks pain and trauma of Iraq’s children
Schools swamped
Unicef has set up centres for displaced people at schools like the one we went to across Dohuk province. Activities are run to keep the children occupied, including drawing exercises from which samples are taken and sent to experts to assess levels of trauma.
(via BBC News - Playfulness masks pain and trauma of Iraq’s children)

Playfulness masks pain and trauma of Iraq’s children

Schools swamped

Unicef has set up centres for displaced people at schools like the one we went to across Dohuk province. Activities are run to keep the children occupied, including drawing exercises from which samples are taken and sent to experts to assess levels of trauma.

(via BBC News - Playfulness masks pain and trauma of Iraq’s children)

LONDON – The kidnapping of more than 200 schoolgirls in northern Nigeria by the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram is beyond outrageous. Sadly, it is just the latest battle in a savage war being waged against the fundamental right of all children to an education. That war is global, as similarly horrifying incidents in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Somalia attest.

Around the world, there have been 10,000 violent attacks on schools and universities in the past four years, according to a report by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack. The evidence is as ample as it is harrowing, from the 29 schoolboys killed by suspected Boko Haram militants in the Nigerian state of Yobe earlier this year and Somali schoolchildren forced to become soldiers to Muslim boys attacked by ethnic Burmese/Buddhist nationalists in Myanmar and schoolgirls in Afghanistan and Pakistan who have been firebombed, shot, or poisoned by the Taliban for daring to seek an education.

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria
Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.

The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria

Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.
It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.

It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

Classroom heroes: Amid violence, teachers committed to children’s learning (by UNICEF)

"We, the teachers, we try to make the violence disappear," says Nguinissara Rita, a primary school teacher in a site for internally displaced people in Bangui. Some 2.3 million children have been affected by the ongoing crisis in the Central African Republic, and for almost two years schooling has been disrupted. Through temporary learning spaces set up by UNICEF and partners, more than 20,000 children are now able to attend classes.

Read more.

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)