Posts tagged education under attack

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.
Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life
(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.

Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life

(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.
At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.
[…]
The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.
“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.
[…]
All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.
Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.
 (via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.

At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.

[…]

The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.

“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.

[…]

All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.

Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.

(via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.
Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.
The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.
(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.

Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.

The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.

(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

KANO, 4 October 2013 (IRIN) - Thousands of students and teachers across northern Nigeria have been forced to abandon their schools due to increasingly brazen attacks by radical Islamist group Boko Haram (BH), officials say.
In the latest school attack, on 29 September, BH gunmen on four-wheel-drive vehicles and motorbikes stormed student dormitories at a college of agriculture in the town of Gujba, in the northern Yobe State, opening fire on sleeping students and killing 40, according to police and government officials. (via IRIN Africa | Boko Haram violence takes toll on education | Nigeria | Children | Education | Security)

KANO, 4 October 2013 (IRIN) - Thousands of students and teachers across northern Nigeria have been forced to abandon their schools due to increasingly brazen attacks by radical Islamist group Boko Haram (BH), officials say.

In the latest school attack, on 29 September, BH gunmen on four-wheel-drive vehicles and motorbikes stormed student dormitories at a college of agriculture in the town of Gujba, in the northern Yobe State, opening fire on sleeping students and killing 40, according to police and government officials. (via IRIN Africa | Boko Haram violence takes toll on education | Nigeria | Children | Education | Security)

Before the crisis, the rate of primary school enrolment in the Syrian Arab Republic had surpassed 90 per cent. But, education has not been spared, amid the disintegration of other vital infrastructure. During the past school year, almost two million Syrian children aged 6–15 dropped out of school because of conflict and displacement. While many have become refugees, more than half – one million children – remain out of school inside the Syrian Arab Republic. 

via Syrian refugee children speak out (by unicef) and For Syrian children, education needs are urgent, and urgently underfunded

More than 3,000 schools in Syria have been damaged or destroyed since the conflict began in the spring of 2011. Another 900 have been turned into shelters. Since last fall, 1.9 million children have dropped out of school—nearly 40% of all registered students in grades 1-9. In Aleppo and Idlib, the war’s most hard-hit provinces, attendance is down to just 23% and 30% respectively, and 1,200 schools have been ruined. In these areas, the vast majority of children are not going to school.
What is UNICEF doing to help? For the most heavily damaged areas, UNICEF plans to deliver 300 prefabricated classrooms; 70 have already been built. School bags with supplies for up to a million children are being distributed in each of Syria’s 14 administrative regions; this month, UNICEF and its partners will launch a home-based program so that 400,000 students who cannot attend school—children in the most dangerous conflict zones—will not fall further behind their peers.
(via Syria: Going to School in Wartime | UNICEF FieldNotesUNICEF FieldNotes)

More than 3,000 schools in Syria have been damaged or destroyed since the conflict began in the spring of 2011. Another 900 have been turned into shelters. Since last fall, 1.9 million children have dropped out of school—nearly 40% of all registered students in grades 1-9. In Aleppo and Idlib, the war’s most hard-hit provinces, attendance is down to just 23% and 30% respectively, and 1,200 schools have been ruined. In these areas, the vast majority of children are not going to school.

What is UNICEF doing to help? For the most heavily damaged areas, UNICEF plans to deliver 300 prefabricated classrooms; 70 have already been built. School bags with supplies for up to a million children are being distributed in each of Syria’s 14 administrative regions; this month, UNICEF and its partners will launch a home-based program so that 400,000 students who cannot attend school—children in the most dangerous conflict zones—will not fall further behind their peers.

(via Syria: Going to School in Wartime | UNICEF FieldNotesUNICEF FieldNotes)

“Expressing my opinions without pressure; living in freedom and safety.” This is how one Syrian child, displaced by war and living in a camp in Turkey, defined the rights of the child during an art class organized with the support of UNICEF Turkey.
The art class was one of a series of activities initiated by UNICEF Turkey in the new child-friendly spaces that it has helped to set up at the Osmaniye and Sarıçam camps as part of its ongoing emergency programme Increasing Resilience of Syrian Children under Temporary Protection in Turkey. The child-friendly spaces provide a safe space for children to undertake recreational and respite activities and will provide the opportunity for children to express themselves through activities of their own choosing. (via Syrian children in Turkey build bridges to the future | Back on Track)

“Expressing my opinions without pressure; living in freedom and safety.” This is how one Syrian child, displaced by war and living in a camp in Turkey, defined the rights of the child during an art class organized with the support of UNICEF Turkey.

The art class was one of a series of activities initiated by UNICEF Turkey in the new child-friendly spaces that it has helped to set up at the Osmaniye and Sarıçam camps as part of its ongoing emergency programme Increasing Resilience of Syrian Children under Temporary Protection in Turkey. The child-friendly spaces provide a safe space for children to undertake recreational and respite activities and will provide the opportunity for children to express themselves through activities of their own choosing. (via Syrian children in Turkey build bridges to the future | Back on Track)

One year after Za’atari camp was carved out of the desert in northern Jordan to host refugees fleeing Syria, the United Nations children’s fund said today that while the makeshift city has reached zero maternal mortality, it grapples with educating tens of thousands of eligible children.
[…] while food, water and sanitation remain key priorities at the camp, a major challenge is education for the 30,000 children that are able to go to school.
“Only 12,000 are registered,” Mr. Vergara said. He added that financial strains necessitating children to work and concerns of insecurity are also challenges to school attendance.
“Parents are reluctant to let the child – especially the daughters – walk through the camp to school. We have created some assembly points to escort the children. It’s not really dangerous, but more cases of harassment,” he added.
(via United Nations News Centre - One year on, UN agency works to educate Syrian children at Za’atari camp in Jordan)

One year after Za’atari camp was carved out of the desert in northern Jordan to host refugees fleeing Syria, the United Nations children’s fund said today that while the makeshift city has reached zero maternal mortality, it grapples with educating tens of thousands of eligible children.

[…] while food, water and sanitation remain key priorities at the camp, a major challenge is education for the 30,000 children that are able to go to school.

“Only 12,000 are registered,” Mr. Vergara said. He added that financial strains necessitating children to work and concerns of insecurity are also challenges to school attendance.

“Parents are reluctant to let the child – especially the daughters – walk through the camp to school. We have created some assembly points to escort the children. It’s not really dangerous, but more cases of harassment,” he added.

(via United Nations News Centre - One year on, UN agency works to educate Syrian children at Za’atari camp in Jordan)