Posts tagged education under attack

LONDON – The kidnapping of more than 200 schoolgirls in northern Nigeria by the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram is beyond outrageous. Sadly, it is just the latest battle in a savage war being waged against the fundamental right of all children to an education. That war is global, as similarly horrifying incidents in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Somalia attest.

Around the world, there have been 10,000 violent attacks on schools and universities in the past four years, according to a report by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack. The evidence is as ample as it is harrowing, from the 29 schoolboys killed by suspected Boko Haram militants in the Nigerian state of Yobe earlier this year and Somali schoolchildren forced to become soldiers to Muslim boys attacked by ethnic Burmese/Buddhist nationalists in Myanmar and schoolgirls in Afghanistan and Pakistan who have been firebombed, shot, or poisoned by the Taliban for daring to seek an education.

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria
Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.

The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria

Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.
It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.

It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

Classroom heroes: Amid violence, teachers committed to children’s learning (by UNICEF)

"We, the teachers, we try to make the violence disappear," says Nguinissara Rita, a primary school teacher in a site for internally displaced people in Bangui. Some 2.3 million children have been affected by the ongoing crisis in the Central African Republic, and for almost two years schooling has been disrupted. Through temporary learning spaces set up by UNICEF and partners, more than 20,000 children are now able to attend classes.

Read more.

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.
Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life
(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.

Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life

(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.
At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.
[…]
The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.
“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.
[…]
All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.
Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.
 (via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.

At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.

[…]

The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.

“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.

[…]

All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.

Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.

(via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.
Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.
The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.
(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.

Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.

The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.

(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

KANO, 4 October 2013 (IRIN) - Thousands of students and teachers across northern Nigeria have been forced to abandon their schools due to increasingly brazen attacks by radical Islamist group Boko Haram (BH), officials say.
In the latest school attack, on 29 September, BH gunmen on four-wheel-drive vehicles and motorbikes stormed student dormitories at a college of agriculture in the town of Gujba, in the northern Yobe State, opening fire on sleeping students and killing 40, according to police and government officials. (via IRIN Africa | Boko Haram violence takes toll on education | Nigeria | Children | Education | Security)

KANO, 4 October 2013 (IRIN) - Thousands of students and teachers across northern Nigeria have been forced to abandon their schools due to increasingly brazen attacks by radical Islamist group Boko Haram (BH), officials say.

In the latest school attack, on 29 September, BH gunmen on four-wheel-drive vehicles and motorbikes stormed student dormitories at a college of agriculture in the town of Gujba, in the northern Yobe State, opening fire on sleeping students and killing 40, according to police and government officials. (via IRIN Africa | Boko Haram violence takes toll on education | Nigeria | Children | Education | Security)