Posts tagged enrolment

Out-of-School Children in Pakistan
A report on out-of-school children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan […] indicates that despite achievements in the education sector, over 6.5 million children are not enrolled in primary education and another 2.7 are not enrolled at lower secondary level.
The Report, prepared in collaboration between the Government of Pakistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics, provides a detailed analyses of out-of-school children and is important for complementing the on-going work in all provinces and areas to scale up evidence based education activities to ensure that all children have access to quality education. (via Report on Out-of-School Children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan indicates 3 out of 10 primary age children are out of school | Back on Track)

Out-of-School Children in Pakistan

A report on out-of-school children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan […] indicates that despite achievements in the education sector, over 6.5 million children are not enrolled in primary education and another 2.7 are not enrolled at lower secondary level.

The Report, prepared in collaboration between the Government of Pakistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics, provides a detailed analyses of out-of-school children and is important for complementing the on-going work in all provinces and areas to scale up evidence based education activities to ensure that all children have access to quality education. (via Report on Out-of-School Children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan indicates 3 out of 10 primary age children are out of school | Back on Track)

57 million children out of school (by unesco)

The Quebec Ministry of Education is proposing to allow four-year-old children from underprivileged families to attend elementary school full-time as part of a campaign to curb the province’s disturbingly high dropout rate.

More than one in three students in the province – 36 per cent – leave school without graduating. And studies showed that most of them come from poor families. For instance, a study conducted in 2008 by the Montreal Health and Social Services Agency concluded that 35 per cent of 5-year-old kindergarten students on the Island of Montreal were from needy families, showed signs of neglect and had learning disabilities that would likely impede their academic progress.

School officials in South Sudan say a monthly take-home food ration from the World Food Programme (WFP) has helped to reduce the number of female students dropping out of school.

[…]

The girls from grades 3-8 who are allowed by their parents to attend classes for at least 20 out of 22 days in a school calendar month receive a 9.9 kilograms of cereal and 3.6 kilograms of vegetable oil. The food serves as an incentive to the parents, who generally prefer to send boys to school, while girls stay home to work, help their families with cooking or are married off early in exchange for bride-price.

“We have witnessed a real increase in the number of girls that have enrolled and stayed in school since we started providing food through the (girls’) incentive,” says Lokang Augustine Okocha, the director of studies at Redeemed Generation Academy in Torit, the capital of Eastern Equatoria State.

Thousands of Ivorian children have dropped out of school because of pillaging and destruction of school buildings, a majority of which are located in economic capital Abidjan. (via Concern about Abidjan school dropout rate | ACTED)

Thousands of Ivorian children have dropped out of school because of pillaging and destruction of school buildings, a majority of which are located in economic capital Abidjan. (via Concern about Abidjan school dropout rate | ACTED)

While Toronto’s population grows, the country’s largest school board has watched its enrolment slide in recent years.

To address that problem, Dr. Christopher Spence, the former B.C. Lions running back and current activist director of education at the Toronto District School Board, stood in front of a classroom of 28 boys at a busy public school on Toronto’s western border and announced his latest plan to increase what he calls “engagement.”

In September, the TDSB will open nine new “elementary academies” inside existing board schools across the city, specializing in vocal music and health and sports, as well as a boys-only and a girls-only school.

[SOUTH SUDAN] Education is a key priority for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.
Sixty-four per cent of children aged 6 to 11 are out of school, and the primary school completion rate is only 10 per cent, among the lowest in the world.
Gender equality is also a huge challenge, with only 37 per cent of girls aged 6 to 13 attending school. Still, thanks to the efforts of dedicated teachers, accelerated learning programmes and children’s clubs, there have been encouraging developments in girls’ education over the past year. (via UNGEI - Republic of South Sudan - Prioritizing education and promoting gender equality in South Sudan)

[SOUTH SUDAN] Education is a key priority for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.

Sixty-four per cent of children aged 6 to 11 are out of school, and the primary school completion rate is only 10 per cent, among the lowest in the world.

Gender equality is also a huge challenge, with only 37 per cent of girls aged 6 to 13 attending school. Still, thanks to the efforts of dedicated teachers, accelerated learning programmes and children’s clubs, there have been encouraging developments in girls’ education over the past year. (via UNGEI - Republic of South Sudan - Prioritizing education and promoting gender equality in South Sudan)

A primary school becomes a model for increasing girls' enrolment

[WESTERN EQUATORIA, South Sudan] Access to education is one of the key priorities for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan. Seventy per cent of children aged 6 to 17 have never set foot in a classroom. The completion rate in primary schools is only 21 per cent, one of the lowest in the world.

Baya Primary School in Western Equatoria has become the envy of other schools in the state. The school is successfully using its own child clubs, not only to increase girls’ enrolment but also encourage dropouts to join the Accelerated Learning Programme (ALP).

NEW YORK (August 10, 2011)— With an estimated 1.8 million children between 5-17 years of age already out of school in southern and central Somalia, a rapid assessment conducted by the Education Cluster, in ten regions, warns this number could increase dramatically when schools open in September unless urgent action is taken.


The assessment, which was carried out last week, indicates that with the movement of an estimated 200,000 school-age children who have migrated to urban areas or across the border due to hunger, the gross primary school enrolment of 30% could plummet even further. This is likely to be compounded by an acute shortage of teachers and an increase in demand for education services in areas where influxes of internally displaced people have been the greatest, such as in Mogadishu.

Despite the government intervention to enable all pupils to access universal education, many schools in the rural areas are grappling with an ever-increasing enrollment.

In many schools, especially primary, the ratio of teachers to pupils is estimated at 1:70 compared to the required ratio of 1:40, depending on subjects taught.