Posts tagged gender

[KENYA] Dadaab — A mix of cultural practices, such as early and forced marriage, as well as child labour, are depriving girls of education in the Dadaab refugee complex in eastern Kenya.


Out of Dadaab’s estimated population of 463,000 mainly Somali refugees, more than half are children under 18; of these about 38 percent attend school. The proportion of girls in the camps’ primary and secondary schools is 38 and 27 percent, respectively, according to the UN Refugee Agency. A third of girls aged between 5 and 13 in Dabaab go to school; for those aged 14 to 17, only one in 20 are enrolled.

In DRC, boys’ discussion groups help prevent sexual violence

[PAKISTAN] Sixteen-year-old Noor Bano believes nothing short of a revolution will convince the men in Malangabad – her remote village in the Khairpur district of the Sindh province, some 460 kilometres from the southern port city of Karachi – to treat women as equals.
Only then, she says, will women and girls be free from forced marriages and be safe from domestic violence. Her words, unusual for such a young girl hailing from the hinterlands of rural Pakistan, take most people by surprise. (via PAKISTAN: Wanted: A Revolution For Girls - IPS ipsnews.net)

[PAKISTAN] Sixteen-year-old Noor Bano believes nothing short of a revolution will convince the men in Malangabad – her remote village in the Khairpur district of the Sindh province, some 460 kilometres from the southern port city of Karachi – to treat women as equals.

Only then, she says, will women and girls be free from forced marriages and be safe from domestic violence. Her words, unusual for such a young girl hailing from the hinterlands of rural Pakistan, take most people by surprise. (via PAKISTAN: Wanted: A Revolution For Girls - IPS ipsnews.net)

[ZIMBABWE] Poverty, abuse and cultural practices are preventing a third of Zimbabwean girls from attending primary school and 67 percent from attending secondary school, denying them a basic education, according to a recent study which found alarming dropout rates for girls. (via IRIN Africa | ZIMBABWE: Thousands of girls forced out of education | Zimbabwe | Children | Education | Gender Issues)

[ZIMBABWE] Poverty, abuse and cultural practices are preventing a third of Zimbabwean girls from attending primary school and 67 percent from attending secondary school, denying them a basic education, according to a recent study which found alarming dropout rates for girls. (via IRIN Africa | ZIMBABWE: Thousands of girls forced out of education | Zimbabwe | Children | Education | Gender Issues)

A primary school becomes a model for increasing girls' enrolment

[WESTERN EQUATORIA, South Sudan] Access to education is one of the key priorities for the government of the world’s newest nation, South Sudan. Seventy per cent of children aged 6 to 17 have never set foot in a classroom. The completion rate in primary schools is only 21 per cent, one of the lowest in the world.

Baya Primary School in Western Equatoria has become the envy of other schools in the state. The school is successfully using its own child clubs, not only to increase girls’ enrolment but also encourage dropouts to join the Accelerated Learning Programme (ALP).

Black schoolboys can choose to perform poorly to avoid undermining their masculinity, the head of the Jamaican Teachers’ Association has said.
Adolph Cameron said that in Jamaica, where homophobia was a big issue, school success was often seen as feminine or “gay”.
He was concerned the same cultural attitude was affecting African-Caribbean male students in the UK. (via BBC News - African-Caribbean boys ‘would rather hustle than learn’)

Black schoolboys can choose to perform poorly to avoid undermining their masculinity, the head of the Jamaican Teachers’ Association has said.

Adolph Cameron said that in Jamaica, where homophobia was a big issue, school success was often seen as feminine or “gay”.

He was concerned the same cultural attitude was affecting African-Caribbean male students in the UK. (via BBC News - African-Caribbean boys ‘would rather hustle than learn’)

BBC

This year’s Because I Am A Girl report launched by Plan International revealed that 65 per cent of participants from Rwanda and India agreed that a woman should tolerate violence in order to keep her family intact. With the theme What About Boys?, the report further found out that another 43 per cent agreed with the statement that there were times when a woman deserved to be beaten. (via Because I Am a Girl Report 2011 - Zunia.org)

This year’s Because I Am A Girl report launched by Plan International revealed that 65 per cent of participants from Rwanda and India agreed that a woman should tolerate violence in order to keep her family intact. With the theme What About Boys?, the report further found out that another 43 per cent agreed with the statement that there were times when a woman deserved to be beaten. (via Because I Am a Girl Report 2011 - Zunia.org)

“While there is little difference between boys and girls in early childhood with respect to nutrition, health, education and other basic indicators, differences by gender appear increasingly more pronounced during adolescence and young adulthood,” said Geeta Rao Gupta, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director.
The data shows that girls are significantly more likely to be married as children (under 18 years of age) and to begin having sex at a young age. Young women are less likely to be literate than young men and are less likely to watch television, listen to the radio and read a newspaper or magazine.
In addition, young men are better informed about HIV/AIDS and are also more likely to protect themselves with condoms during sex. Young women in sub-Saharan Africa, the report says, are two to four times more likely to be infected with HIV/AIDS than young men.

(via Gaps between boys and girls in developing world widen as they get older – UN report)

“While there is little difference between boys and girls in early childhood with respect to nutrition, health, education and other basic indicators, differences by gender appear increasingly more pronounced during adolescence and young adulthood,” said Geeta Rao Gupta, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director.

The data shows that girls are significantly more likely to be married as children (under 18 years of age) and to begin having sex at a young age. Young women are less likely to be literate than young men and are less likely to watch television, listen to the radio and read a newspaper or magazine.

In addition, young men are better informed about HIV/AIDS and are also more likely to protect themselves with condoms during sex. Young women in sub-Saharan Africa, the report says, are two to four times more likely to be infected with HIV/AIDS than young men.

(via Gaps between boys and girls in developing world widen as they get older – UN report)

BEIJING, Aug. 8 (Xinhua) — An official document released on Monday pledged that the government will endeavor to provide compulsory education to 95 percent of Chinese girls over the next ten years.

The Outline for the Development of Chinese Women (2011-2020) issued by the State Council, or China’s cabinet, said that the government will continue to promote equal opportunity for nine years of free schooling for all children, but especially for girls, who are more likely to drop out.

… investing in adolescent girls is both the best and smartest investment a country can make. Educated, healthy and skilled, she will be an active citizen in her community. She will become a mother when she is ready and invest in her future children’s health and education. She will be able to contribute fully to her society and break the cycle of poverty, one girl at a time.