Posts tagged girls

LONDON – The kidnapping of more than 200 schoolgirls in northern Nigeria by the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram is beyond outrageous. Sadly, it is just the latest battle in a savage war being waged against the fundamental right of all children to an education. That war is global, as similarly horrifying incidents in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Somalia attest.

Around the world, there have been 10,000 violent attacks on schools and universities in the past four years, according to a report by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack. The evidence is as ample as it is harrowing, from the 29 schoolboys killed by suspected Boko Haram militants in the Nigerian state of Yobe earlier this year and Somali schoolchildren forced to become soldiers to Muslim boys attacked by ethnic Burmese/Buddhist nationalists in Myanmar and schoolgirls in Afghanistan and Pakistan who have been firebombed, shot, or poisoned by the Taliban for daring to seek an education.

DAKAR / NEW YORK, 6 May 2014 – “The abduction of eight more girls in Nigeria is an outrage and a worsening nightmare for the girls themselves and for the families of the more than 200 girls who have been stolen from their communities in the last several weeks.
“That the girls are alleged to have been abducted to prevent them from attending school is especially abhorrent.
“UNICEF calls on the abductors to immediately return these girls unharmed to their communities, and we implore all those with influence on the perpetrators to do everything they can to secure the safe return of the girls - and to bring their abductors to justice.
“Our hearts go out to the families of these girls. UNICEF continues to monitor the situation and expresses its solidarity with the people of Nigeria.” (via UNICEF statement on second abduction of Nigerian school girls | UNICEF Canada : No Child too Far)

DAKAR / NEW YORK, 6 May 2014 – “The abduction of eight more girls in Nigeria is an outrage and a worsening nightmare for the girls themselves and for the families of the more than 200 girls who have been stolen from their communities in the last several weeks.

“That the girls are alleged to have been abducted to prevent them from attending school is especially abhorrent.

“UNICEF calls on the abductors to immediately return these girls unharmed to their communities, and we implore all those with influence on the perpetrators to do everything they can to secure the safe return of the girls - and to bring their abductors to justice.

“Our hearts go out to the families of these girls. UNICEF continues to monitor the situation and expresses its solidarity with the people of Nigeria.” (via UNICEF statement on second abduction of Nigerian school girls | UNICEF Canada : No Child too Far)

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria
Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria.

The kidnapping of 234 girls from a physics exam by Boko Haram grabbed the world’s attention. But this isn’t isolated – fear of school has become ingrained in northern Nigeria

Halimatu Usman, 14, spends her days doing house chores in her home of Marte, near Lake Chad in Borno state, Nigeria. Her school has been shut to pre-empt attacks from members of the Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad or Boko Haram (meaning western education is forbidden) a group waging an insurgency to establish an Islamic government in Nigeria. As she fills the earthenware pot, she counts herself lucky not to be in a refugee camp in neighbouring Niger Republic or among the 234 girls abducted by Boko Haram insurgents from a physics exam in GGSS Chibok and taken to the Sambisa Forest reserve, leaving their parents and an entire country distraught. (via Girls brave violence for their education in northern Nigeria | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional)

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’
Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.
School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.
The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.
At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.
Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.
[…]
ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.
"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."
Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.
(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’

Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.

School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.

The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.

At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.

Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.

[…]

ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.

"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."

Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.

(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

Why Girls’ Education Matters
With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

Why Girls’ Education Matters

With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?
This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?

This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall. 
For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.
On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall.

For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.

On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

CNN

[NIGER] NIAMEY , May 20 2013 (IPS) - A decade ago, less than a third of school-aged girls in Niger were in class. Today, though significant cultural and religious opposition remains, nearly two-thirds of girls are enrolled in school.
“Back in 2003, we had only 15 girls at my school, out of 150 students. Now, we have 103 girls out of a total of 175 students,” said Ibrahim Sani, who has taught for 17 years in the town of Agadez, in the northern part of this West African country.
Between 2001 and 2011, Niger’s overall rate of enrolment for girls rose from 29 to 63 percent, according to the Ministry of Education. (via IPS – It Takes a Village to Educate a Girl | Inter Press Service)

[NIGER] NIAMEY , May 20 2013 (IPS) - A decade ago, less than a third of school-aged girls in Niger were in class. Today, though significant cultural and religious opposition remains, nearly two-thirds of girls are enrolled in school.

“Back in 2003, we had only 15 girls at my school, out of 150 students. Now, we have 103 girls out of a total of 175 students,” said Ibrahim Sani, who has taught for 17 years in the town of Agadez, in the northern part of this West African country.

Between 2001 and 2011, Niger’s overall rate of enrolment for girls rose from 29 to 63 percent, according to the Ministry of Education. (via IPS – It Takes a Village to Educate a Girl | Inter Press Service)

Saudi Arabian girls will be allowed to play sport in private schools for the first time in the latest in a series of incremental changes aimed at slowly increasing women’s rights in the ultraconservative kingdom.
Saudi Arabia’s official press agency, SPA, reported on Saturday that private girls’ schools are now allowed to hold sport activities in accordance with the rules of sharia law. Students must adhere to “decent dress” codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the education ministry’s requirements.
The decision makes sport once again a stage for the push to improve women’s rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics. (via Saudi Arabia to allow girls to play sport at private schools | World news | guardian.co.uk)

Saudi Arabian girls will be allowed to play sport in private schools for the first time in the latest in a series of incremental changes aimed at slowly increasing women’s rights in the ultraconservative kingdom.

Saudi Arabia’s official press agency, SPA, reported on Saturday that private girls’ schools are now allowed to hold sport activities in accordance with the rules of sharia law. Students must adhere to “decent dress” codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the education ministry’s requirements.

The decision makes sport once again a stage for the push to improve women’s rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics. (via Saudi Arabia to allow girls to play sport at private schools | World news | guardian.co.uk)