Posts tagged girls' education

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?
This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?

This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

A new approach to getting girls into school in the Niger (by UNICEF)

UNICEF.org reports:

So far, 7 per cent of the two million schoolchildren in the Niger are enrolled in child-friendly schools.

Maman Boukar Kollimi, Regional Director of Education in Maradi, explains what a child-friendly school entails. “A child-friendly school is a school where life is enjoyable. It is a school where the basic needs are met, including shade trees, latrines, water points, classrooms with enough benches and tables, well-trained teachers. It is a learning environment where the community is involved in everything we do.”

Equality between girls and boys is encouraged in the classrooms – and in the school yard. Teachers are trained to provide children with a safe and gender-sensitive environment. They use teaching methods that prevent gender bias, for example, and they keep girls and boys together in lines and school activities.

Read more.

Bangladesh: What girls need to stay in school (by UNICEF)

This year, on 11 October, the International Day of the Girl Child focuses on Innovating for Girls’ Education. The day provides a platform to highlight the continued importance of girls’ education as well as examples of successful, scalable and innovative approaches for tackling lingering challenges related to access, keeping girls in school and ensuring that their education is relevant and meaningful to their future.

(via UNICEF: Innovate to ensure all girls are educated for the twenty-first century)

Also see:

Education in Nigeria is in crisis: 10.5 million children are out of school, more than in any other country, and over half of adults in the country are illiterate, a legacy of decades of poor education.
[…] The education crisis in Nigeria is not only one of access, but also quality. The large number of Nigerian children and young people emerging from school with limited literacy or numeracy skills demands urgent action to improve the country’s education. 
[…] The 2012 EFA Global Monitoring Report, Youth and skills: Putting education to work, showed that among young men aged 15 to 29 in 2008 who had left school after six years of schooling, 28% were illiterate and 39% were semi-illiterate. The figures are even worse for young women: 32% were illiterate and 52% were semi-illiterate.
(via Spotlight on Nigeria’s education crisis | World Education Blog)

Education in Nigeria is in crisis: 10.5 million children are out of school, more than in any other country, and over half of adults in the country are illiterate, a legacy of decades of poor education.

[…] The education crisis in Nigeria is not only one of access, but also quality. The large number of Nigerian children and young people emerging from school with limited literacy or numeracy skills demands urgent action to improve the country’s education.

[…] The 2012 EFA Global Monitoring Report, Youth and skills: Putting education to work, showed that among young men aged 15 to 29 in 2008 who had left school after six years of schooling, 28% were illiterate and 39% were semi-illiterate. The figures are even worse for young women: 32% were illiterate and 52% were semi-illiterate.

(via Spotlight on Nigeria’s education crisis | World Education Blog)

The Burka Avenger

A masked crusader is taking over Pakistan and she’s not your average superhero.

An intelligent schoolteacher by day, an enemy of injustice by night, the Burka Avenger fights Taliban-like extremists for women’s rights and education.

The superhero’s name is Jiya, who conceals her identity in a burka — the full-body cloak worn by some Muslim women.

via Voice of America.

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall. 
For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.
On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

For decades, this is where Detroit’s pregnant teens and young mothers have come to earn their diplomas. It’s the only school in the city that gives them space to study while their babies are cared for just down the hall.

For the 100 students at Catherine Ferguson, high school diplomas are the minimum expectation; college acceptance letters are the aim. It has a reputation for academic rigor and comprehensive study: Students might spend afternoons on internships, weeks traveling overseas and hours working small plots on the school’s farm.

On the walls, there are posters encouraging condom use, photos of newborns and beaming images of Catherine Ferguson graduates, all in their gowns, caps and tassels. (via Fighting for the ‘throwaway’ girls - CNN.com)

CNN

Dear Malala (by Plan International)

A two-minute film of girls from all over the world writing a letter of solidarity to Malala. The film highlights the need for girls’ education and asks the viewer to Raise Your Hand in support of girls’ education.

Malala Yousafzai may be one of the best-known students in the world, but she is also a teacher. This month she will mark her 16th birthday by coming to the United Nations and sharing an important lesson about education — particularly for girls around the world.
Malala is the courageous young education rights campaigner from Pakistan who was targeted and shot by extremists on her way to school. After a long road to recovery, Malala is back and determined to keep making her voice heard.
On 12 July, Malala will be joined by hundreds of students from more than 80 countries in a unique Youth Assembly, where diplomats will take a back seat as young people take over the UN. They will gather to issue a global call for quality education for all. (via UN Global Education First Initiative – United Nations Secretary General’s Global Initiative on Education – Malala Comes to the United Nations)
Photo credit: Vitalvoices.org

Malala Yousafzai may be one of the best-known students in the world, but she is also a teacher. This month she will mark her 16th birthday by coming to the United Nations and sharing an important lesson about education — particularly for girls around the world.

Malala is the courageous young education rights campaigner from Pakistan who was targeted and shot by extremists on her way to school. After a long road to recovery, Malala is back and determined to keep making her voice heard.

On 12 July, Malala will be joined by hundreds of students from more than 80 countries in a unique Youth Assembly, where diplomats will take a back seat as young people take over the UN. They will gather to issue a global call for quality education for all. (via UN Global Education First Initiative – United Nations Secretary General’s Global Initiative on Education – Malala Comes to the United Nations)

Photo credit: Vitalvoices.org