Posts tagged girls' education

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’
Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.
School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.
The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.
At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.
Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.
[…]
ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.
"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."
Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.
(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’

Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.

School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.

The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.

At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.

Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.

[…]

ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.

"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."

Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.

(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

Eastern Sudan is a region facing extreme poverty, as well as high rates of undernutrition and maternal and infant mortality. Its schools have among the lowest enrolment rates in the country.
According to the 2010 Sudan Household Health Survey, only 48.9 per cent of girls and 61.4 per cent of boys in the state attend school. And, only 28.7 per cent of children complete primary school, compared to a national average of 62.7 per cent.
But, at Jamam primary school, the transition to a CFS model has brought about major improvements in learning, as well as in student enrolment and retention. (via In the Sudan, a transformed school transforms children – and their community | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Eastern Sudan is a region facing extreme poverty, as well as high rates of undernutrition and maternal and infant mortality. Its schools have among the lowest enrolment rates in the country.

According to the 2010 Sudan Household Health Survey, only 48.9 per cent of girls and 61.4 per cent of boys in the state attend school. And, only 28.7 per cent of children complete primary school, compared to a national average of 62.7 per cent.

But, at Jamam primary school, the transition to a CFS model has brought about major improvements in learning, as well as in student enrolment and retention. (via In the Sudan, a transformed school transforms children – and their community | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

A full courseload for pastoralist children in Somalia (by UNICEF)

Somali children who once would have bypassed schooling to herd their families’ animals are now busy studying, thanks to a programme focused on rural and pastoralist communities.

[…]

Since the programme began in March 2012, more than 3,000 children have been educated, according to Save the Children, which is implementing the UNICEF project.

Nearly 45 per cent of those children are girls – like 13-year-old Ayen Noor Mohamed, who attends Xareed Primary School in Somaliland.

See more at: Back on Track

Why Girls’ Education Matters
With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

Why Girls’ Education Matters

With 31 million girls of primary school age out of school, and 17 million expected never to enter school at all, the situation for girls’ education desperately needs addressing. (via Why girls’ education matters | World Education Blog)

Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’
Cibar, a bright, beautiful girl, is deaf. Even when times are good, she needs specialized help. For just over a month, she’s been living in Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq, one of the more than 61,000 Syrian refugees who have arrived since the middle of August – bringing the total registered in Iraq to 196,843. Before that, the conflict kept her away from school. Her story is tragically common.
Why, with all that’s happened, does school matter so much? Adla starts crying. “Because I want to help my mother and father,” she says, quickly wiping the tears from her eyes. But there’s no way for Adla to do that. There’s no secondary school in Kawergosk. And there is certainly no special needs teaching for Cibar.

(via Field diary: Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’ | Back on Track)

Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’

Cibar, a bright, beautiful girl, is deaf. Even when times are good, she needs specialized help. For just over a month, she’s been living in Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq, one of the more than 61,000 Syrian refugees who have arrived since the middle of August – bringing the total registered in Iraq to 196,843. Before that, the conflict kept her away from school. Her story is tragically common.

Why, with all that’s happened, does school matter so much? Adla starts crying. “Because I want to help my mother and father,” she says, quickly wiping the tears from her eyes. But there’s no way for Adla to do that. There’s no secondary school in Kawergosk. And there is certainly no special needs teaching for Cibar.

(via Field diary: Two Syrian refugees in Iraq’s Kawergosk camp at risk of becoming ‘lost schoolgirls’ | Back on Track)

A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education

In the Niger, about 36 per cent of girls are married before the age of 15. Only 16 per cent attend middle school, and only half complete the cycle. Supporting girls past primary school is necessary to ensure that they complete their education, and to protect them from child marriage and early pregnancy.

According to the director of the secondary school in Yaouri, Kabirou Ibrah, “In 2011, there were no girls. In 2012, there were only three. And, you see, this year, thanks to UNICEF, there is up to 16 girls. Most students who do not have tutors and who live far abandon secondary school during the first year.”

(via A fellowship programme in the Niger gives rural girls access to secondary education | Back on Track)

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?
This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25%?

This new infographic reminds us that when we FAIL to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education. (via Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results [INFOGRAPHIC] | Education for All Blog | Global Partnership for Education)

A new approach to getting girls into school in the Niger (by UNICEF)

UNICEF.org reports:

So far, 7 per cent of the two million schoolchildren in the Niger are enrolled in child-friendly schools.

Maman Boukar Kollimi, Regional Director of Education in Maradi, explains what a child-friendly school entails. “A child-friendly school is a school where life is enjoyable. It is a school where the basic needs are met, including shade trees, latrines, water points, classrooms with enough benches and tables, well-trained teachers. It is a learning environment where the community is involved in everything we do.”

Equality between girls and boys is encouraged in the classrooms – and in the school yard. Teachers are trained to provide children with a safe and gender-sensitive environment. They use teaching methods that prevent gender bias, for example, and they keep girls and boys together in lines and school activities.

Read more.

Bangladesh: What girls need to stay in school (by UNICEF)

This year, on 11 October, the International Day of the Girl Child focuses on Innovating for Girls’ Education. The day provides a platform to highlight the continued importance of girls’ education as well as examples of successful, scalable and innovative approaches for tackling lingering challenges related to access, keeping girls in school and ensuring that their education is relevant and meaningful to their future.

(via UNICEF: Innovate to ensure all girls are educated for the twenty-first century)

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