Posts tagged inclusive education

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.
(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.

(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

In Madagascar, more than a million children are not in school. There are many reasons behind school exclusion, but children with disabilities, like Clarisse, are particularly marginalized – only 11 per cent of children with disabilities are enrolled in school.

Since 2008, UNICEF Madagascar has supported a variety of activities to bring children back to school. UNICEF Education Officer Minako Morimoto explains the approach of inclusive education: “It consists of giving each child access to elementary-level schooling and keeping them in the system to complete the education cycle.”

Teachers also receive training specifically for working in an inclusive environment.

In Madagascar, a process was initiated for pupils and their parents to identify neighbourhood children who should be integrated into the school system. Pupils were asked to draw a ’map of exclusion’ of their village, while parents discussed measures to bring excluded children back to school.

(via UNICEF - Madagascar - In Madagascar, ‘back to school’ means including those left out)

[THAILAND] Cultural barriers continue to deny disabled children access to schools, but progress on inclusive education is finally gathering.(via Thailand takes first steps on long road to inclusive mainstream education | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

[THAILAND] Cultural barriers continue to deny disabled children access to schools, but progress on inclusive education is finally gathering.
(via Thailand takes first steps on long road to inclusive mainstream education | Global development | guardian.co.uk)

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

[RWANDA] Currently, the ministry of education and Unicef fund 54 “child-friendly” schools across Rwanda, which also provide “best-practice” examples to other schools in their cluster areas. A 2009 Unicef report on the initiative indicates that they have assisted 7,500 disabled children. The government is aiming to expand the programme to 400 schools nationwide by 2012, and has also adopted it as the basic standard for all Rwanda’s primary schools. (via Rwanda makes gains in all-inclusive education | Society | Guardian Weekly)

Education Insights: Making education inclusive for all

According to UNESCO, inclusion “…involves changes and modifications in content, approaches, structures and strategies, with a common vision which covers all children of the appropriate age range and a conviction that it is the responsibility of the regular system to educate all children.”   

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