Posts tagged instruction

OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.
The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.
As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.

The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.

As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

El Sistema’s aim is to address a depressingly universal problem: how to remove children from poverty’s snares, like drugs, crime, gangs and desperation. The method, imagined by El Sistema’s founder, the economist and trained musician José Antonio Abreu, was classical music. Orchestras and music training centers around the country were established to occupy young people with music study and to instill values that can come from playing in ensembles: a sense of community, commitment and self-worth.
(via El Sistema, Venezuela’s Plan to Help Children Through Music - NYTimes.com)

El Sistema’s aim is to address a depressingly universal problem: how to remove children from poverty’s snares, like drugs, crime, gangs and desperation. The method, imagined by El Sistema’s founder, the economist and trained musician José Antonio Abreu, was classical music. Orchestras and music training centers around the country were established to occupy young people with music study and to instill values that can come from playing in ensembles: a sense of community, commitment and self-worth.

(via El Sistema, Venezuela’s Plan to Help Children Through Music - NYTimes.com)

The Thai government has embarked on an ambitious nationwide programme to teach English at least once a week in all state schools as part of the new 2012 English Speaking Year project.
The initiative is intended to ease Thailand’s entry into the Asean community in 2015, when southeast Asia becomes one economic zone and a universal language is required for communication and business.
The project will focus on speaking English rather than studying its grammar, with teachers provided training through media modules and partnerships with foreign institutions, including English-language schools, according to Thailand’s education ministry. (via Thai schools urged to boost speaking | Education | Guardian Weekly)

The Thai government has embarked on an ambitious nationwide programme to teach English at least once a week in all state schools as part of the new 2012 English Speaking Year project.

The initiative is intended to ease Thailand’s entry into the Asean community in 2015, when southeast Asia becomes one economic zone and a universal language is required for communication and business.

The project will focus on speaking English rather than studying its grammar, with teachers provided training through media modules and partnerships with foreign institutions, including English-language schools, according to Thailand’s education ministry. (via Thai schools urged to boost speaking | Education | Guardian Weekly)

[AUSTRALIA] ALMOST $48 million of federal money to help children with disabilities in NSW schools will be spent on teacher training, the Premier, Barry O’Farrell, said.

The money is part of a $200 million program to improve resources for disabled students announced in the federal budget last year, the Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, said yesterday.

Under the agreement, which NSW is the first state to sign, the money can be spent on technical aids, teacher training or additional staff.

Since Romania and Bulgaria’s accession to the EU, more and more Roma have flocked to Germany, many of whom send their children to school without any knowledge of the language, the Berliner Umschau states.

The teachers at the Hermann Schulz primary school in Berlin-Reinickendorf have sent a letter to the authorities to complain about the matter.

In one of the classes at the school, 20% of the children are Roma with no knowledge of German.

The teachers have complained that they are no longer capable of catering to the needs of the entire classes and are finding it impossible to teach the curriculum.

[ANGOLA] The provincial department of Education, Science and Technology of Huíla Province, begins this school term with teaching the Umbundu and Nganguela vernacular languages in primary and secondary schools of Huíla Province, in order to allow children to improve learning, spirit of self-confidence and feeling of cultural integration.
English has been the medium of instruction in most of Namibia’s classrooms for nearly 20 years, but with teachers shown to be failing in competency tests, calls for change are mounting (via Namibia’s language policy is ‘poisoning’ its children | Education | Guardian Weekly)

English has been the medium of instruction in most of Namibia’s classrooms for nearly 20 years, but with teachers shown to be failing in competency tests, calls for change are mounting (via Namibia’s language policy is ‘poisoning’ its children | Education | Guardian Weekly)

[VIETNAM] For more than a decade, Nguyen Thi Quyen’s ethnic minority students in Lao Chai village primary school would stare at her blankly, unable to respond to her questions. As the school year wore on, they dropped out to tend farm animals or hawk knick-knacks to the tourists.


Quyen was teaching in Vietnamese, the language of the majority Kinh, but ethnic minorities in the country’s northern hills speak Mong […] With Vietnamese the official language for education, school remains inaccessible for many ethnic minorities, who comprise 13 percent of the population and are among the country’s most impoverished.