Posts tagged minorities

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.
The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.
(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.

The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.

(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

Educating Romani children: why Europe must make it a priority
We’ve been discussing the “Roma issue” for two decades. Why are the Roma different? Why are there so many problems integrating this minority and what can be done? All answers lead to education.
All questions have the same answer: because they do not have an education. A quarter of Romania’s illiterate population is Roma and the majority of Romani students leave school by the eighth grade, with only 0.5% of Roma graduating from university.
Roma aren’t outcasts because they’re Roma: they’re outcasts because they don’t have an education due to the extreme poverty in which they live. Poverty and books do not mix. I sometimes see stories about students studying by candlelight. They are the exceptions, which is why we see them on the news. But the rule is rather this: those who live in poverty today will perpetuate in misery forever. (via Educating Romani children: why Europe must make it a priority | openDemocracy)

Educating Romani children: why Europe must make it a priority

We’ve been discussing the “Roma issue” for two decades. Why are the Roma different? Why are there so many problems integrating this minority and what can be done? All answers lead to education.

All questions have the same answer: because they do not have an education. A quarter of Romania’s illiterate population is Roma and the majority of Romani students leave school by the eighth grade, with only 0.5% of Roma graduating from university.

Roma aren’t outcasts because they’re Roma: they’re outcasts because they don’t have an education due to the extreme poverty in which they live. Poverty and books do not mix. I sometimes see stories about students studying by candlelight. They are the exceptions, which is why we see them on the news. But the rule is rather this: those who live in poverty today will perpetuate in misery forever. (via Educating Romani children: why Europe must make it a priority | openDemocracy)

Since Romania and Bulgaria’s accession to the EU, more and more Roma have flocked to Germany, many of whom send their children to school without any knowledge of the language, the Berliner Umschau states.

The teachers at the Hermann Schulz primary school in Berlin-Reinickendorf have sent a letter to the authorities to complain about the matter.

In one of the classes at the school, 20% of the children are Roma with no knowledge of German.

The teachers have complained that they are no longer capable of catering to the needs of the entire classes and are finding it impossible to teach the curriculum.

[VIETNAM] For more than a decade, Nguyen Thi Quyen’s ethnic minority students in Lao Chai village primary school would stare at her blankly, unable to respond to her questions. As the school year wore on, they dropped out to tend farm animals or hawk knick-knacks to the tourists.


Quyen was teaching in Vietnamese, the language of the majority Kinh, but ethnic minorities in the country’s northern hills speak Mong […] With Vietnamese the official language for education, school remains inaccessible for many ethnic minorities, who comprise 13 percent of the population and are among the country’s most impoverished.

unicef:

DAILY LIFE - SIBLINGS - April 26, 2011
Afghanistan, 2007:  (Left-right) Zahra, 9, and Rajab Ali, 12, stand, while their younger brother, Najaf, 6, puts on his shoes, outside their home, in the village of Zargaran in the central Bamyan Province. They are members of the Hazara ethnic  minority. Rajab and Zahra both go to school, but spend the rest of their day weaving carpets and performing other domestic chores to help support the family. Their father sells dried fruits at a market in Bamyan City.
© UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani
 To see more images like this, join us on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/unicef

unicef:

DAILY LIFE - SIBLINGS - April 26, 2011

Afghanistan, 2007:  (Left-right) Zahra, 9, and Rajab Ali, 12, stand, while their younger brother, Najaf, 6, puts on his shoes, outside their home, in the village of Zargaran in the central Bamyan Province. They are members of the Hazara ethnic  minority. Rajab and Zahra both go to school, but spend the rest of their day weaving carpets and performing other domestic chores to help support the family. Their father sells dried fruits at a market in Bamyan City.

© UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani

 To see more images like this, join us on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/unicef