Posts tagged parents

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.
“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.
In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.
[…]
The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.
The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.
Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.
“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.

“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.

In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.

[…]

The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.

The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.

Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.

“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

A new approach to getting girls into school in the Niger (by UNICEF)

UNICEF.org reports:

So far, 7 per cent of the two million schoolchildren in the Niger are enrolled in child-friendly schools.

Maman Boukar Kollimi, Regional Director of Education in Maradi, explains what a child-friendly school entails. “A child-friendly school is a school where life is enjoyable. It is a school where the basic needs are met, including shade trees, latrines, water points, classrooms with enough benches and tables, well-trained teachers. It is a learning environment where the community is involved in everything we do.”

Equality between girls and boys is encouraged in the classrooms – and in the school yard. Teachers are trained to provide children with a safe and gender-sensitive environment. They use teaching methods that prevent gender bias, for example, and they keep girls and boys together in lines and school activities.

Read more.

Kindergarten comes to the young children of semi-nomadic herder families in Khuvsgul province, Mongolia, in mobile tents pitched seasonally in their remote districts.
The mobile ger kindergartens are a unique solution to the problem of providing education to a nomadic population. They function in rural areas from June to August and, where weather permits, from May to November. As well as providing early childhood education, they give children the opportunity to socialize with others. In Mongolia, herder families live spread out over a wide area and can be very isolated, particularly in the winter when the days shorten, temperatures plunge and heavy snow piles up outside. The gers also give teachers better access to parents, and allow the parents to go out and work, tending their livestock and preparing for the next winter. (via UNICEF - At a glance: Mongolia - Mobile kindergarten for nomadic Mongolian children)

Kindergarten comes to the young children of semi-nomadic herder families in Khuvsgul province, Mongolia, in mobile tents pitched seasonally in their remote districts.

The mobile ger kindergartens are a unique solution to the problem of providing education to a nomadic population. They function in rural areas from June to August and, where weather permits, from May to November. As well as providing early childhood education, they give children the opportunity to socialize with others. In Mongolia, herder families live spread out over a wide area and can be very isolated, particularly in the winter when the days shorten, temperatures plunge and heavy snow piles up outside. The gers also give teachers better access to parents, and allow the parents to go out and work, tending their livestock and preparing for the next winter. (via UNICEF - At a glance: Mongolia - Mobile kindergarten for nomadic Mongolian children)

Croatia says no to Sex Education

CROATIA’s top court in its capital Zagreb, recently suspended Sexual Education lessons in all public schools.

It said that the government failed to consult parents when it introduced the classes that are fiercly opposed by conservative groups and religious authorities.

“Enabling parents to take part in the preparation of a curriculum, is a country’s constitutional obligation,” said judge Mato Arlovic.

Consulting pupils’ parents was “notably important in a curriculum linked to different attitudes and beliefs,” he added.

The suspension came after complaints from various quarters which claimed that the lessons violated the constitution because it was implemented without parental approval.

[US] In decades of debate on school reform in Mississippi, though, one issue is ever-present but draws little public discussion: race.

The state’s public schools remain nearly as segregated, in some cases, as they did in the 1960s. In many communities across the state, especially in towns where black children are in the majority, white children almost exclusively attend small private schools founded around the time of court-mandated desegregation in the late 1960s.

Black children, by contrast, usually attend the public schools in these communities. This is also true in Jackson, the state capital. The consequences have been devastating for the state in terms of educational attainment and economic disparities.

The Singapore Ministry of Education has been surveying educators and parents about their concerns with the Singapore education system. The results reveal worries about a perceived over-emphasis on exams and grades that contribute to a high stress education system that overlooks non-academic talents.
A group of French parents and teachers have called for a two-week boycott of homework in schools, saying it is useless, tiring and reinforces inequalities between children.
They say homework pushes the responsibility for learning on parents and causes rows between themselves and their children. And they conclude children would be better off reading a book. (via French parents to boycott homework | World news | guardian.co.uk)

A group of French parents and teachers have called for a two-week boycott of homework in schools, saying it is useless, tiring and reinforces inequalities between children.

They say homework pushes the responsibility for learning on parents and causes rows between themselves and their children. And they conclude children would be better off reading a book. (via French parents to boycott homework | World news | guardian.co.uk)

In conflict zones, when it’s not safe to leave your house to get information, mobile phones can bridge the gap and keep everyone connected," says Souktel co-founder Jacob Korenblum. "This basic technology allows aid workers, educators and local families to stay in contact at all times."

Here’s how it works: At each school, principals and teachers are given password-protected access to a web interface, where they can send SMS alerts to all parents’ mobile phones. In an emergency, they could write, “Attack near school today, please keep your children at home.” Once the violence has ended, another message could go out saying, “Shelling has stopped; please come to school this morning.