Posts tagged reform

[US] Galloway, a mostly middle-class community northwest of Atlantic City, is part of a wave of districts across the nation trying to remake homework amid concerns that high-stakes testing and competition for college have fueled a nightly grind that is stressing out children and depriving them of play and rest, yet doing little to raise achievement, particularly in elementary grades. (via In Homework Revolt, More Schools Districts Cutting Back - NYTimes.com)

[US] Galloway, a mostly middle-class community northwest of Atlantic City, is part of a wave of districts across the nation trying to remake homework amid concerns that high-stakes testing and competition for college have fueled a nightly grind that is stressing out children and depriving them of play and rest, yet doing little to raise achievement, particularly in elementary grades. (via In Homework Revolt, More Schools Districts Cutting Back - NYTimes.com)

[PAKISTAN] Sindh Assembly passes resolution against corporal punishment in schools

The Sindh Assembly in Pakistan has unanimously passed a resolution against corporal punishment in both private and public schools in the Sindh province, after the issue was raised by the news channel ‘Geo News’ in one of their news programmes.

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.
The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.

The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

PARIS - Most primary schools in Paris shut down Tuesday as teachers went on strike over the Socialist government’s plans to make children attend classes five days a week, instead of the current four.
President Francois Hollande promised as part of his election campaign last year to add a half day of classes on Wednesday - currently a day off - and shorten the school day for the rest of the week.
His argument was that French kids’ education was suffering because they had one of the shortest school years in Europe but the longest school day. (via French teachers strike over having to work five-day week)

PARIS - Most primary schools in Paris shut down Tuesday as teachers went on strike over the Socialist government’s plans to make children attend classes five days a week, instead of the current four.

President Francois Hollande promised as part of his election campaign last year to add a half day of classes on Wednesday - currently a day off - and shorten the school day for the rest of the week.

His argument was that French kids’ education was suffering because they had one of the shortest school years in Europe but the longest school day. (via French teachers strike over having to work five-day week)

[EGYPT] Much is at stake: If schools continue to churn out mediocre graduates, the high youth unemployment will most likely worsen. An improved education system, on the other hand, holds out the promise of producing citizens who can build a prosperous democracy at the heart of the Arab world.


“We’re sure that this is an important period in Egypt’s history,” says Mohammed Srogy, a new public relations adviser at the Ministry of Education. “We believe that education is the gateway for the renaissance of Egypt.”

MEXICO CITY — A plan to overhaul Mexico’s public education system has been ratified by 18 of the country’s 31 states, allowing it to be enacted by President Enrique Pena Nieto, officials confirmed Wednesday.

The law, which is backed by Pena Nieto and was approved by Congress in December, calls for creation of a professional system for hiring, evaluating and promoting teachers without the “discretionary criteria” currently used in a system where teaching positions are often bought or inherited.

[INDIA] The National council of teacher education (NCTE) has taken an initiative to reform and revamp teaching education system in the country. Following the implementation of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education-2009, the government is now gearing up to reform the teaching education system with an aim to improve the quality of procedures and practices. Following the exercise, all courses of teacher education like BEd, MEd, NTT (Nursery Teachers Training), BPEd and MPEd will get revised.

[TUNISIA] A three-day national conference on how to reform Tunisia’s educational system will kick off tomorrow in the Tunisian capital.

Experts in education, members of various civil society organizations and political parties, and a high number of parents will attend the conference.

The event will discuss the way forward regarding the necessary reforms that the Tunisian educational system should implement.

According to Khaled Chabbi, the spokesman for the Ministry of Education, the goal is to “highlight the existing defects from which the current Tunisian educational system is suffering, and review its methodology in light of results learned throughout previous attempts at reforms.”

[DUBAI] Dusty and deserted school libraries are having a long overdue injection of fun. The “least-visited facilities” in Abu Dhabi’s government schools are being converted into Learning Resource Centres, where children will go for classes, activities and research. Each centre will be stocked with more than 3,000 English and Arabic books, magazines and newspapers.
They will be made more spacious with comfortable furniture and will include a role-playing area, reading corners, multimedia access, TV and an online catalogue.
The makeover, to be complete in three years, is part of Abu Dhabi Education Council’s solution to children’s diminishing interest in reading. (via Boring school libraries? Not any more - The National)

[DUBAI] Dusty and deserted school libraries are having a long overdue injection of fun. The “least-visited facilities” in Abu Dhabi’s government schools are being converted into Learning Resource Centres, where children will go for classes, activities and research. Each centre will be stocked with more than 3,000 English and Arabic books, magazines and newspapers.

They will be made more spacious with comfortable furniture and will include a role-playing area, reading corners, multimedia access, TV and an online catalogue.

The makeover, to be complete in three years, is part of Abu Dhabi Education Council’s solution to children’s diminishing interest in reading. (via Boring school libraries? Not any more - The National)

Schools in England should be fined if pupils leave school with poor literacy skills, an independent report into last year’s riots says. It adds they should demonstrate how they are building pupils’ characters, and give careers advice to each child. (via BBC News - Schools should be fined for illiteracy, says riot panel)

Schools in England should be fined if pupils leave school with poor literacy skills, an independent report into last year’s riots says. It adds they should demonstrate how they are building pupils’ characters, and give careers advice to each child. (via BBC News - Schools should be fined for illiteracy, says riot panel)

BBC