Posts tagged refugees

Canada Helping Children in Remote Regions of Kenya Access Quality Education

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August 21, 2014: Canada’s support to UNICEF will help provide more children with specialized teachers, safe schools, and more effective delivery of education in remote communities.

The project aims to increase the number of children, especially girls, attending school in Garissa and Turkana counties, two remote and arid regions of Kenya with high poverty rates, recurrent droughts, and large refugee populations. In these counties, access to governmental services is low, especially for nomadic communities. The project also aims to improve children’s education through activities that include training teachers, renovating classrooms, setting up mobile schools and upgrading the national curriculum.

Source: ReliefWeb

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.
It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.

It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

Three years ago, after they had first fled to Damascus, Shaiima and her family then fled again, crossing the border into Lebanon after a harrowing journey. They set up what was supposed to be a short-term, alternative shelter amid some 15 tents.

Today, they are among 1,000 refugees living on this strip of muddy lowland next to a polluted stream, and the makeshift tent has become their home for an indeterminate future. 

[…] Children are now able to attend non-formal educational classes organized by local NGO Beyond Association, supported by UNICEF, right on the settlement. The child-friendly spaces provide basic literacy and numeracy classes, an accelerated learning programme, English lessons, psychosocial support and structured recreational activities for the refugee children. Some 400 children between the ages of 6 and 14 participate in either the morning or afternoon shifts. (via Refugee children determined to keep learning, as Syrian conflict reaches three-year mark | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)

Before arriving at the Charahi Qambar camp for internally displaced people, 16-year-old Agha LaLay had never attended school. He didn’t know how to read, didn’t know how to write, and his math skills were nonexistent.

That was five years ago. His family, like many of the families here, fled their home in Helmand province to escape constant fighting. They joined thousands of other people living in this camp.

Although relatively peaceful, life here is difficult, too. LaLay lives in a small cluster of mud-brick buildings with 19 relatives. There is still no running water, no toilet, and no electricity. Food is always in short supply. Most of the adults can’t read or write.

Read more.

via Building a future: Education for conflict-displaced children in Afghanistan (by UNICEF)

ADEN, 11 October 2013 (IRIN) - Teachers, parents and education officials in Yemen’s second-largest city, Aden, are hoping the newly started school year will be the first in three years to be uninterrupted by humanitarian crises, political disruption or conflict.
The optimism follows the return of at least 162,253 internally displaced people (IDPs) back to conflict-hit Abyan Governorate. (via IRIN Middle East | Briefing: Schools start fresh after years of disruption in southern Yemen | Yemen | Conflict | Education | Governance | Refugees/IDPs)

ADEN, 11 October 2013 (IRIN) - Teachers, parents and education officials in Yemen’s second-largest city, Aden, are hoping the newly started school year will be the first in three years to be uninterrupted by humanitarian crises, political disruption or conflict.

The optimism follows the return of at least 162,253 internally displaced people (IDPs) back to conflict-hit Abyan Governorate. (via IRIN Middle East | Briefing: Schools start fresh after years of disruption in southern Yemen | Yemen | Conflict | Education | Governance | Refugees/IDPs)

Before the crisis, the rate of primary school enrolment in the Syrian Arab Republic had surpassed 90 per cent. But, education has not been spared, amid the disintegration of other vital infrastructure. During the past school year, almost two million Syrian children aged 6–15 dropped out of school because of conflict and displacement. While many have become refugees, more than half – one million children – remain out of school inside the Syrian Arab Republic. 

via Syrian refugee children speak out (by unicef) and For Syrian children, education needs are urgent, and urgently underfunded

Ambassadors for education, in Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan (by unicef)

ZA’ATARI CAMP, Jordan, 12 September 2013 – A group of young girls are striding out of the school gates with a purpose. The new school year is starting, and they’re on a mission to get their peers back to school.

Mozoun, 14, is one of thirty 12- to 15-year-olds who are crossing the refugee camp, home to some 120,000 Syrians, to promote education to children and their parents.

She comes across a mother and her children hanging up washing outside their caravan. She has so much energy that her words can’t come out quickly enough. She’s determined to pass on her message.

“I love education, and I’m aware of the importance of it. People must tell others about good things that they know and not keep them for themselves,” says Mozoun.

More here.

One child, one of one million Syrian refugee children (by unicef)

More here, from CRIN:

SYRIA: Child Refugees Reach One Million

UN agencies say the number of children forced to flee Syria has reached one million, describing the figure as “a shameful milestone”.

The UN’s refugee agency and Unicef say a further two million children are displaced within the country.

[…]

Just 118,000 of the refugee children have been able to continue in some sort of education, and a fifth have received psychosocial counselling.

Syrian volunteer teachers – men and women, old and young – participate in a teacher training session to learn how to work best with their pupils in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees.
[…] There are approximately 1,500 Syrian teachers working in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees. Some left their country two years ago; others have been here for just a few months. All of them say the same thing: No matter how difficult the situation we are in, teaching and helping children keeps us on our feet.
(via In Turkey, teachers learn how to work better with their Syrian refugee pupils | Back on Track)

Syrian volunteer teachers – men and women, old and young – participate in a teacher training session to learn how to work best with their pupils in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees.

[…] There are approximately 1,500 Syrian teachers working in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees. Some left their country two years ago; others have been here for just a few months. All of them say the same thing: No matter how difficult the situation we are in, teaching and helping children keeps us on our feet.

(via In Turkey, teachers learn how to work better with their Syrian refugee pupils | Back on Track)