Posts tagged report

Despite high enrolment rates, many children in the region of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/CIS), are missing out on education.

According to the latest study published by the Out-of-School Children Initiative, 2.5 million children of basic school age and 1.6 million children of pre-primary school age are missing out on school due to a serious shortage of services and facilities.

Children in poor regions and rural areas, children with the lowest socioeconomic backgrounds, working children and children in conflict with the law often benefit least from education. Additionally, many more children from the most marginalized communities are excluded from national data collection procedures and thus are invisible.

(via Including all children in quality learning – new report on Out-of-School Children | Back on Track)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers
Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.
The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.
(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers

Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.

The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.

(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.
About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.
“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)

Seven out of 10 primary school students in the Central African Republic (CAR) have not returned to school since the conflict started in December 2012, according to a recent survey by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners.

About 65 per cent of schools surveyed were looted, occupied or damaged by bullets or shells, the agency said in a news release about the survey, which was carried out in August in 11 of the country’s 17 prefectures.

“A school is meant to be a safe space for teaching and learning, but in some areas there is nothing left,” said UNICEF Representative in CAR Souleymane Diabaté. “Without teachers, desks, textbooks – how can a child learn?” (via United Nations News Centre - UNICEF: 70 per cent of children in Central African Republic still not in school)

rtamerica:

Public school children living in poverty across US in highest numbers since 1960s
A new study by the Southern Education Foundation has revealed that the number of low income students enrolled in schools across the United States has surged in recent years to new astronomical numbers.
According to the study, 17 of the 50 states in the country can say that at least half of their students come from households with incomes at or below the poverty line.

rtamerica:

Public school children living in poverty across US in highest numbers since 1960s

A new study by the Southern Education Foundation has revealed that the number of low income students enrolled in schools across the United States has surged in recent years to new astronomical numbers.

According to the study, 17 of the 50 states in the country can say that at least half of their students come from households with incomes at or below the poverty line.

Out-of-School Children in Pakistan
A report on out-of-school children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan […] indicates that despite achievements in the education sector, over 6.5 million children are not enrolled in primary education and another 2.7 are not enrolled at lower secondary level.
The Report, prepared in collaboration between the Government of Pakistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics, provides a detailed analyses of out-of-school children and is important for complementing the on-going work in all provinces and areas to scale up evidence based education activities to ensure that all children have access to quality education. (via Report on Out-of-School Children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan indicates 3 out of 10 primary age children are out of school | Back on Track)

Out-of-School Children in Pakistan

A report on out-of-school children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan […] indicates that despite achievements in the education sector, over 6.5 million children are not enrolled in primary education and another 2.7 are not enrolled at lower secondary level.

The Report, prepared in collaboration between the Government of Pakistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics, provides a detailed analyses of out-of-school children and is important for complementing the on-going work in all provinces and areas to scale up evidence based education activities to ensure that all children have access to quality education. (via Report on Out-of-School Children in the Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan indicates 3 out of 10 primary age children are out of school | Back on Track)




Perspectives of Irreplaceable Teachers
This paper focuses on what our respondents told us about three broad topics that have clear policy ramifications: What does effective (and ineffective) teaching look like? How do the best teachers become so effective? And what do great teachers think about their profession? Several themes emerged. 

Perspectives of Irreplaceable Teachers

This paper focuses on what our respondents told us about three broad topics that have clear policy ramifications: What does effective (and ineffective) teaching look like? How do the best teachers become so effective? And what do great teachers think about their profession? Several themes emerged. 

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.
(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

Across China, children and young people with disabilities confront discrimination in schools. This report documents how mainstream schools deny many such children admission, ask them to leave, or fail to provide appropriate classroom accommodations to help them overcome barriers related to their disabilities. While children with mild disabilities are in mainstream schools where they continue to face challenges, children with more serious disabilities are excluded from the mainstream education system, and a significant number of those interviewed by Human Rights Watch receive no education at all.

(via “As Long as They Let Us Stay in Class” | Human Rights Watch)

This 33-page report is based on more than 70 interviews, including with 16 students and 11 teachers who fled Syria, primarily from Daraa, Homs, and greater Damascus. The report documents the use of schools for military purposes by both sides. It also describes how teachers and state security agents interrogated and beat students for alleged anti-government activity, and how security forces and shabiha, pro-government militias, assaulted peaceful student demonstrations. In several instances reported to Human Rights Watch, government forces fired on school buildings that were not being used for military purposes. (via Safe No More | Human Rights Watch)

This 33-page report is based on more than 70 interviews, including with 16 students and 11 teachers who fled Syria, primarily from Daraa, Homs, and greater Damascus. The report documents the use of schools for military purposes by both sides. It also describes how teachers and state security agents interrogated and beat students for alleged anti-government activity, and how security forces and shabiha, pro-government militias, assaulted peaceful student demonstrations. In several instances reported to Human Rights Watch, government forces fired on school buildings that were not being used for military purposes. (via Safe No More | Human Rights Watch)

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.
A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008.

A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school. (via Children still battling to go to school | World Education Blog)

Which country devotes the highest proportion of its public spending to education?* And which country has the highest percentage of 25- to 34-year-olds with upper secondary education?** The answers to these and many other vital questions about education policy can be found in Education at a Glance 2013, the annual education report from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
[…] On average, teachers in OECD countries earn 80% to 89% of the salaries of other full-time workers with tertiary education in the same country. Lower secondary teachers in Canada, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Portugal, South Korea and Spain all earn higher salaries, on average, than non-teachers. At the other end of the spectrum, lower secondary teachers in the Czech Republic, Iceland, Italy, the Slovak Republic and the United States earn close to half of the salary of non-teachers.
(via OECD report takes the pulse of education worldwide | World Education Blog)

Which country devotes the highest proportion of its public spending to education?* And which country has the highest percentage of 25- to 34-year-olds with upper secondary education?** The answers to these and many other vital questions about education policy can be found in Education at a Glance 2013, the annual education report from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

[…] On average, teachers in OECD countries earn 80% to 89% of the salaries of other full-time workers with tertiary education in the same country. Lower secondary teachers in Canada, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Portugal, South Korea and Spain all earn higher salaries, on average, than non-teachers. At the other end of the spectrum, lower secondary teachers in the Czech Republic, Iceland, Italy, the Slovak Republic and the United States earn close to half of the salary of non-teachers.

(via OECD report takes the pulse of education worldwide | World Education Blog)