Posts tagged school

Watch children, parents and teachers discuss what it’s been like for Syrian refugee children to return to learning through ‘non-formal’ classes, in Lebanon.

via For Syrian children in Lebanon, a return to learning (by UNICEF)

In Mexico, the project “to school by bike” makes the journey to school for students in rural areas an easy and fun experience. The scheme, initiated by the local authorities, already covers students in eight primary and secondary schools and is rapidly expanding. 

via Mexico: Pedaling for Education (Learning World S4E9 1/3) (by WISEQatar)

"Sur le chemin de l’école" is the new film of Pascal Plisson in which he depicts the journey to school of children in different parts of the world. Salome and Jackson are one of four sets of people featured in the film. On their road to school in rural Kenya, which is about 20 km long, they sometimes face dangerous animals such as lions and elephants…

Kenya: Risky Road to School (Learning World S4E9 3/3) (by WISEQatar)

One child, one of one million Syrian refugee children (by unicef)

More here, from CRIN:

SYRIA: Child Refugees Reach One Million

UN agencies say the number of children forced to flee Syria has reached one million, describing the figure as “a shameful milestone”.

The UN’s refugee agency and Unicef say a further two million children are displaced within the country.

[…]

Just 118,000 of the refugee children have been able to continue in some sort of education, and a fifth have received psychosocial counselling.

57 million children out of school (by unesco)

Young Champions’ initiative is a programme of the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI). In Pakistan, it is conducted in partnership with the UNICEF Punjab office, Jahandad Society for Community Development (JSCD), and government social welfare and education departments.
Through the programme, educated youth are selected and trained to encourage families in their communities to enrol children in school.
“‘Young Champions’ … envisions involving adolescents as ‘young champions’ to become advocates and change-makers in their communities, to address gender concerns, increase girl child enrolment and decrease drop outs,” said UNICEF Education Officer Sehr Raza Qizilbash. “Over the last two years, this initiative has produced encouraging results and made a substantial contribution to UNICEF’s objective of enrolling every school-going-aged child in target districts.” (via UNGEI - Pakistan - Youth advocates help enrol of out-of-school children in Pakistan)

Young Champions’ initiative is a programme of the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI). In Pakistan, it is conducted in partnership with the UNICEF Punjab office, Jahandad Society for Community Development (JSCD), and government social welfare and education departments.

Through the programme, educated youth are selected and trained to encourage families in their communities to enrol children in school.

“‘Young Champions’ … envisions involving adolescents as ‘young champions’ to become advocates and change-makers in their communities, to address gender concerns, increase girl child enrolment and decrease drop outs,” said UNICEF Education Officer Sehr Raza Qizilbash. “Over the last two years, this initiative has produced encouraging results and made a substantial contribution to UNICEF’s objective of enrolling every school-going-aged child in target districts.” (via UNGEI - Pakistan - Youth advocates help enrol of out-of-school children in Pakistan)

“We don’t attend school,” says Yvette. “We wake up every morning, go to get clean and then go to pray. After that, I help my mother with lunch. We don’t have much else to do.”

UNICEF has partnered with Vision Jeunesse Nouvelle and Save the Children to provide organized recreational activities for children and youth at the transit centre. Child-friendly activities provide children with learning, play and entertainment activities. Such ‘child-friendly spaces’ are designed to serve as safe and protected spaces for children to be in times of emergency.

(via UNICEF - Rwanda - In Rwanda, helping Congolese refugee children be children again)

The Quebec Ministry of Education is proposing to allow four-year-old children from underprivileged families to attend elementary school full-time as part of a campaign to curb the province’s disturbingly high dropout rate.

More than one in three students in the province – 36 per cent – leave school without graduating. And studies showed that most of them come from poor families. For instance, a study conducted in 2008 by the Montreal Health and Social Services Agency concluded that 35 per cent of 5-year-old kindergarten students on the Island of Montreal were from needy families, showed signs of neglect and had learning disabilities that would likely impede their academic progress.

[SIERRA LEONE] Thousands of children in Sierra Leone are paying for their own education or helping their families make ends meet by working as rock-breakers for the country’s construction industry.
Child labour is nothing new in Sierra Leone, but the brutal job of breaking stones with a hammer for hours on end in the baking heat has raised particular concern.
[…]
Education and child labour are often closely entwined in Sierra Leone, where schooling can impose a severe financial strain. Although primary education is nominally free, parents must pay for uniforms, books, pens, transport and in some cases contributions to teachers’ salaries. To send their children to school, therefore, many parents must also send them to work. (via IRIN Africa | SLIDESHOW: Children break rocks to pay for school in Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Children | Economy | Education)

[SIERRA LEONE] Thousands of children in Sierra Leone are paying for their own education or helping their families make ends meet by working as rock-breakers for the country’s construction industry.

Child labour is nothing new in Sierra Leone, but the brutal job of breaking stones with a hammer for hours on end in the baking heat has raised particular concern.

[…]

Education and child labour are often closely entwined in Sierra Leone, where schooling can impose a severe financial strain. Although primary education is nominally free, parents must pay for uniforms, books, pens, transport and in some cases contributions to teachers’ salaries. To send their children to school, therefore, many parents must also send them to work. (via IRIN Africa | SLIDESHOW: Children break rocks to pay for school in Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Children | Economy | Education)