Posts tagged schools

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.
“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.
In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.
[…]
The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.
The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.
Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.
“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.

“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.

In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.

[…]

The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.

The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.

Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.

“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

Three years ago, after they had first fled to Damascus, Shaiima and her family then fled again, crossing the border into Lebanon after a harrowing journey. They set up what was supposed to be a short-term, alternative shelter amid some 15 tents.

Today, they are among 1,000 refugees living on this strip of muddy lowland next to a polluted stream, and the makeshift tent has become their home for an indeterminate future. 

[…] Children are now able to attend non-formal educational classes organized by local NGO Beyond Association, supported by UNICEF, right on the settlement. The child-friendly spaces provide basic literacy and numeracy classes, an accelerated learning programme, English lessons, psychosocial support and structured recreational activities for the refugee children. Some 400 children between the ages of 6 and 14 participate in either the morning or afternoon shifts. (via Refugee children determined to keep learning, as Syrian conflict reaches three-year mark | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Eastern Sudan is a region facing extreme poverty, as well as high rates of undernutrition and maternal and infant mortality. Its schools have among the lowest enrolment rates in the country.
According to the 2010 Sudan Household Health Survey, only 48.9 per cent of girls and 61.4 per cent of boys in the state attend school. And, only 28.7 per cent of children complete primary school, compared to a national average of 62.7 per cent.
But, at Jamam primary school, the transition to a CFS model has brought about major improvements in learning, as well as in student enrolment and retention. (via In the Sudan, a transformed school transforms children – and their community | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Eastern Sudan is a region facing extreme poverty, as well as high rates of undernutrition and maternal and infant mortality. Its schools have among the lowest enrolment rates in the country.

According to the 2010 Sudan Household Health Survey, only 48.9 per cent of girls and 61.4 per cent of boys in the state attend school. And, only 28.7 per cent of children complete primary school, compared to a national average of 62.7 per cent.

But, at Jamam primary school, the transition to a CFS model has brought about major improvements in learning, as well as in student enrolment and retention. (via In the Sudan, a transformed school transforms children – and their community | UNICEF:Learning for Peace)

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world.

He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century.

(via A Bleak Picture for Children’s Education in the Arab World | Brookings Institution)

Jibon is 12 years old and works at a fish market in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. He lives alone with his mother, who works in a garment factory.

The little money Jibon makes is essential for the survival of his family. For this reason, Jibon dropped out of school after only the second grade. In all likelihood, he will never have the opportunity to go back to school.

“I don’t have a father. My mother has to work, but her income is not enough for me to go to school,” Jibon says. “Yes, I want to go to school, but I cannot, because we don’t have enough money.”

Jibon shares the same fate with millions of children in South Asia. According to a recent study on out-of-school children published by UNICEF and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics under the Global Out-of-School Children Initiative, 17 million children of primary-school age and 9.9 million children of lower secondary-school age are out of school in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka – placing South Asia as the region with the second-highest number of out-of-school children in the world.

(via In Bangladesh, learning why children are out of school  | Back on Track)

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.
Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.
(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

Courage and Hope gives voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.

Their stories are documented by journalists, emphasizing the human dimension. The voices of these teachers suggest that a number of obstacles are commonly faced by teachers living with HIV. Paramount among them are stigma and discrimination, both within their families and communities as well as their workplaces and in society more generally. The difficulties of overcoming stigma and discrimination are further exacerbated by a failure to ensure confidentiality in the workplace.

(via Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.
Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life
(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

[MALI] Children in Timbuktu are returning to their classrooms over a year since the end of the occupation of the ancient desert city by militant Islamists.

Schools dispensing ‘western-style’ education – as opposed to Qur’anic institutions – had been prime targets for attack. Books were burned, furniture looted and buildings destroyed. Now Timbuktu is firmly on the road to postwar recovery there has been a slow but steady return to normal life

(via Mali pupils return to school in Timbuktu – video | Global development | theguardian.com)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.
At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.
[…]
The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.
“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.
[…]
All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.
Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.
 (via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

Residents of a town in north-east Nigeria are furious at the Nigerian security forces for withdrawing checkpoints ahead of a bloody attack by Islamist militants on a local school.

At least 29 teenage boys died in the raid, blamed on Boko Haram, on a rural boarding school in Yobe state. Residents say soldiers guarding a nearby checkpoint were mysteriously withdrawn just before the attack.

[…]

The attackers reportedly hurled explosives into student residential buildings, sprayed gunfire into rooms and hacked a number of students at the secondary school to death.

“Some of the students’ bodies were burned to ashes,” Police Commissioner Sanusi Rufai said of the raid on the Federal Government College of Buni Yadi.

[…]

All the victims were boys - female students were told to go home, get married and abandon education, said teachers at the school.

Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is sin”, has attacked dozens of schools in north-east Nigeria, since it began it began its bloody fight for an Islamic state in the north of the country in 2009.

(via BBC News - Nigeria school attack: Fury at military over Yobe deaths)

The Game of Bullying Prevention

Doctoral student Geoff Marietta, Ed.M.’13, and Jeff Orkin — cofounders of Giant Otter Technologies, Inc. — worked together to create SchoolLife, an antibullying video game. We take a closer look at this winner of the Harvard Education Innovation Contest, the MIT iGame Entrepreneurial Competition, and a National Science Foundation grant. (via The Game of Bullying Prevention | Harvard Graduate School of Education)