Posts tagged schools

Despite high enrolment rates, many children in the region of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/CIS), are missing out on education.

According to the latest study published by the Out-of-School Children Initiative, 2.5 million children of basic school age and 1.6 million children of pre-primary school age are missing out on school due to a serious shortage of services and facilities.

Children in poor regions and rural areas, children with the lowest socioeconomic backgrounds, working children and children in conflict with the law often benefit least from education. Additionally, many more children from the most marginalized communities are excluded from national data collection procedures and thus are invisible.

(via Including all children in quality learning – new report on Out-of-School Children | Back on Track)

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum
Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.
Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.
“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.
via Taipei Times

[TAIWAN] Ministry approves new “brainwashing” curriculum

Ministry Groups yesterday protested the Ministry of Education’s bid to “slightly adjust” the national high-school curriculum, calling the move part of a “brainwashing” policy that would see the new curriculum reflect a more China-oriented perspective.

Despite the groups’ opposition, the ministry later formally approved a new curriculum on Chinese literature and social sciences.

“Taiwanese have fought long and hard to reach a stage where there is much less political influence on our education, so it is therefore unacceptable that the government under the leadership of President Ma Ying-jeou [馬英九] is making an U-turn on this progress,” Jim Lee (李筱峰), a professor at National Taipei University of Education’s Graduate School of Taiwanese Culture, told a rally in front of the ministry in Taipei.

via Taipei Times

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation
A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation

A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.
Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.
The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.
(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

– 7-year old Tas Ismail dreams of being a teacher when she grows up. The little girl took a big step towards her goal today when she and her friends received their first school reports at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey’s Gaziantep province.

Those most excited by the end of term ceremony were Tac and other first-grade students, who collected their first-ever school reports. Tac’s class-mate, Serif Abroz, whose family fled from the Syrian city of Edlib, said he’s now looking forward to playing with his friends as classes end for a two-week break.

The school, in the tented city of Islahiye, opened in November 2013, and was constructed by UNICEF in partnership with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD). Operating on a double-shift basis, the school has 46 classrooms which hold 2,544 students, ranging from nursery school to high school. There are a total of 69 teachers, 64 of whom are Syrian and five who are Turkish.

(via Syrian students celebrate a first at a UNICEF-built school in Turkey | #ChildrenofSyria)

Two months after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, schools officially reopened in the Philippines, a positive step towards recovery as families continue piecing their lives back together.

via Schools reopen in typhoon damaged areas of the Philippines (by UNICEF)

 

Before arriving at the Charahi Qambar camp for internally displaced people, 16-year-old Agha LaLay had never attended school. He didn’t know how to read, didn’t know how to write, and his math skills were nonexistent.

That was five years ago. His family, like many of the families here, fled their home in Helmand province to escape constant fighting. They joined thousands of other people living in this camp.

Although relatively peaceful, life here is difficult, too. LaLay lives in a small cluster of mud-brick buildings with 19 relatives. There is still no running water, no toilet, and no electricity. Food is always in short supply. Most of the adults can’t read or write.

Read more.

via Building a future: Education for conflict-displaced children in Afghanistan (by UNICEF)

Like many survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, 17-year-old Lian Fernandez, a high school senior, now faces an uncertain future. With her school damaged, a setback in her education is among lingering challenges.

[…] For school children, getting back into the classroom provides a sense of normalcy and a place to be safe and protected while continuing their education. But, a number of schools were devastated by the typhoon, and those that weren’t entirely destroyed are now housing evacuees and displaced persons.

Read more.

via Lian Fernandez, 17, looks to rebuild her life — and return to school — after Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

In the Philippines, returning to school following Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

“I am happy to be back to school because my classmates survived,” says Alexa, 8.

In areas of the Philippines affected by the typhoon, about 90 per cent of school buildings were damaged – more than 3,200 schools in all – leaving over a million pupils and 34,000 teachers with no place for learning. In Leyte province alone, 760 schools were damaged. The Philippine Government, with the support of UNICEF and other partners, has worked to get children back to a normal schedule as quickly as possible, first with a ‘soft’ opening of schools in December, to be followed by a full reopening in January.

Read more here: UNICEF | Back on Track

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]
Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.
The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.
Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.
(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

[Photo credit: ©UNICEF/Syria/2013/Youngmeyer. Children take part in an activity at a UNICEF-supported school club in Tartous governorate]

Despite extraordinary challenges associated with the on-going conflict, UNICEF-supported school clubs in Syria have reached close to 290,000 children with remedial education and recreation activities.

The conflict is taking a serious toll on school infrastructure, limiting education opportunities for children across the country. Over 4,000 schools — or one in five — are either damaged or destroyed, or being used to shelter displaced families.

Many children have lost one or even two years of schooling, while others have dropped out with little chance of a return to school or benefitting from alternative learning opportunities. Since the last school year, as many as one million children in Syria have dropped out of school.

(via School clubs help conflict-affected children in Syria access remedial education, recreation activities | Back on Track)

A full courseload for pastoralist children in Somalia (by UNICEF)

Somali children who once would have bypassed schooling to herd their families’ animals are now busy studying, thanks to a programme focused on rural and pastoralist communities.

[…]

Since the programme began in March 2012, more than 3,000 children have been educated, according to Save the Children, which is implementing the UNICEF project.

Nearly 45 per cent of those children are girls – like 13-year-old Ayen Noor Mohamed, who attends Xareed Primary School in Somaliland.

See more at: Back on Track