Posts tagged students

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.
Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.
… almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.
(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

Before the current onslaught of Israeli airstrikes, the UN had estimated that Gaza needed an additional 250 schools to meet demand. Now, more than 200 schools have been destroyed.

Tomorrow, the children of the Gaza Strip are due back to class, but the danger of attending school in the current conflict means that term has been delayed. Tens of thousands of children are now living inside their schools, their homes destroyed.

almost half a million school children living in Gaza will not be able to start the new term this Sunday, which could “have a devastating long-term impact on children’s education and mental health”.

(via Gaza Children Are Meant To Go Back To School Tomorrow (But They Won’t))

Thousands of California kids don’t get past middle school
Although the majority of dropouts leave in high school, thousands of California students never make it to the ninth grade. Legislative efforts to draw attention to the problem have fallen by wayside. With most dropout prevention and recovery efforts centered on the upper grades – and previous statewide budget problems that cut resources – these students slip through the cracks early on and are faced with bleak futures unless they find their own way back.
(via Thousands of California kids don’t get past middle school | The Hechinger Report)

Thousands of California kids don’t get past middle school

Although the majority of dropouts leave in high school, thousands of California students never make it to the ninth grade. Legislative efforts to draw attention to the problem have fallen by wayside. With most dropout prevention and recovery efforts centered on the upper grades – and previous statewide budget problems that cut resources – these students slip through the cracks early on and are faced with bleak futures unless they find their own way back.

(via Thousands of California kids don’t get past middle school | The Hechinger Report)

SPAIN has recorded the highest number of school drop-outs in the European Union for the third year in a row.Nearly a quarter of young Spaniards (23.5%) grow tired of the education system and quit before reaching the compulsory age, according to Eurostat.
While this is double the EU’s average rate of 11.9%, it is still Spain’s best result on record and a huge decrease from 2007’s 31%.
(via Massive drop-out rate in Spanish schools)

SPAIN has recorded the highest number of school drop-outs in the European Union for the third year in a row.

Nearly a quarter of young Spaniards (23.5%) grow tired of the education system and quit before reaching the compulsory age, according to Eurostat.

While this is double the EU’s average rate of 11.9%, it is still Spain’s best result on record and a huge decrease from 2007’s 31%.

(via Massive drop-out rate in Spanish schools)

In the Netherlands … 15-year-olds score higher than the OECD average in reading, mathematics and science literacy. So how does one country achieve such good results? Cees, who teaches in a secondary school in Amsterdam, says: “I find it difficult to answer why the Netherlands is doing so well, because what do grades mean? To which countries do you compare?
But there are several clues to the Netherlands’ high performance in his answers he gave to our questions about how he does his job. They reflect many of the strategies to provide the best teachers that we outline in latest EFA Global Monitoring Report, Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all, including getting enough teachers into school; training teachers to meet the needs of all children; including the disadvantaged; providing teachers trainees with mentors; and providing ongoing teacher training and professional development. (via Student-focused learning helps the Netherlands achieve | World Education Blog)

In the Netherlands … 15-year-olds score higher than the OECD average in reading, mathematics and science literacy. So how does one country achieve such good results? Cees, who teaches in a secondary school in Amsterdam, says: “I find it difficult to answer why the Netherlands is doing so well, because what do grades mean? To which countries do you compare?

But there are several clues to the Netherlands’ high performance in his answers he gave to our questions about how he does his job. They reflect many of the strategies to provide the best teachers that we outline in latest EFA Global Monitoring Report, Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all, including getting enough teachers into school; training teachers to meet the needs of all children; including the disadvantaged; providing teachers trainees with mentors; and providing ongoing teacher training and professional development. (via Student-focused learning helps the Netherlands achieve | World Education Blog)

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.
“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.
In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.
[…]
The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.
The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.
Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.
“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.

“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.

In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.

[…]

The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.

The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.

Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.

“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

[South Korea] The National Assembly on Thursday passed a bill that aims to prevent Korean students from taking school courses beyond their regular academic schedule.

Rep. Kang Eun-hee of the Saenuri Party, who proposed the bill with Rep. Lee Sang-min of the Democratic Party, said Korean students are often forced to study subjects for subsequent semesters in advance at school or private institutes, known as hagwon. The widespread practice, even involving elementary school students, is meant to boost their chances for admission to elite schools.

The excessive competition leads to more difficult entrance exams by higher level education institutes, which in turn pushes students to study more courses in advance. Rep. Kang said the practice is a main factor driving up the already heated private education system in Korea, spawning a profitable market valued at 19.4 trillion won ($17.9 billion) per year.

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation
A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation

A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

Two months after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, schools officially reopened in the Philippines, a positive step towards recovery as families continue piecing their lives back together.

via Schools reopen in typhoon damaged areas of the Philippines (by UNICEF)

 

Like many survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, 17-year-old Lian Fernandez, a high school senior, now faces an uncertain future. With her school damaged, a setback in her education is among lingering challenges.

[…] For school children, getting back into the classroom provides a sense of normalcy and a place to be safe and protected while continuing their education. But, a number of schools were devastated by the typhoon, and those that weren’t entirely destroyed are now housing evacuees and displaced persons.

Read more.

via Lian Fernandez, 17, looks to rebuild her life — and return to school — after Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

In Mexico, the project “to school by bike” makes the journey to school for students in rural areas an easy and fun experience. The scheme, initiated by the local authorities, already covers students in eight primary and secondary schools and is rapidly expanding. 

via Mexico: Pedaling for Education (Learning World S4E9 1/3) (by WISEQatar)