Posts tagged students

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.
“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.
In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.
[…]
The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.
The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.
Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.
“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Apr 7 2014 (IPS) - Following scattered defiance of the Taliban earlier, a new wave of students is now heading for education in schools and colleges across the troubled north of Pakistan.

“There is a steady increase in enrolment of students because parents have realised the significance of education, and now they want to thwart the Taliban’s efforts to deprive students of education,” Pervez Khan, education officer in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), tells IPS.

In 2012, he says, the literacy rate for girls was three percent in FATA. That rose to 10.5 percent in 2013.

[…]

The boys literacy rate shot up correspondingly to 36.6 percent compared to 29.5 percent.

The Taliban are opposed to modern education. They have destroyed about 500 schools, including 300 schools for girls.

Khan says the Taliban’s campaign against education is only propelling more of the tribal population towards schools.

“The majority of people know that the Taliban are pursuing anti-people activities, such as damaging schools, and therefore they are now coming in droves,” he says.

[South Korea] The National Assembly on Thursday passed a bill that aims to prevent Korean students from taking school courses beyond their regular academic schedule.

Rep. Kang Eun-hee of the Saenuri Party, who proposed the bill with Rep. Lee Sang-min of the Democratic Party, said Korean students are often forced to study subjects for subsequent semesters in advance at school or private institutes, known as hagwon. The widespread practice, even involving elementary school students, is meant to boost their chances for admission to elite schools.

The excessive competition leads to more difficult entrance exams by higher level education institutes, which in turn pushes students to study more courses in advance. Rep. Kang said the practice is a main factor driving up the already heated private education system in Korea, spawning a profitable market valued at 19.4 trillion won ($17.9 billion) per year.

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation
A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

guardian:

British girl leads Guardian campaign to end female genital mutilation

A 17-year-old student is calling on education secretary, Michael Gove, to help end female genital mutilation in Britain by asking headteachers to train and inform teachers and parents about the horrors of the practice. theguardian.com/end-fgm

Two months after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, schools officially reopened in the Philippines, a positive step towards recovery as families continue piecing their lives back together.

via Schools reopen in typhoon damaged areas of the Philippines (by UNICEF)

 

Like many survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, 17-year-old Lian Fernandez, a high school senior, now faces an uncertain future. With her school damaged, a setback in her education is among lingering challenges.

[…] For school children, getting back into the classroom provides a sense of normalcy and a place to be safe and protected while continuing their education. But, a number of schools were devastated by the typhoon, and those that weren’t entirely destroyed are now housing evacuees and displaced persons.

Read more.

via Lian Fernandez, 17, looks to rebuild her life — and return to school — after Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

In Mexico, the project “to school by bike” makes the journey to school for students in rural areas an easy and fun experience. The scheme, initiated by the local authorities, already covers students in eight primary and secondary schools and is rapidly expanding. 

via Mexico: Pedaling for Education (Learning World S4E9 1/3) (by WISEQatar)

"Sur le chemin de l’école" is the new film of Pascal Plisson in which he depicts the journey to school of children in different parts of the world. Salome and Jackson are one of four sets of people featured in the film. On their road to school in rural Kenya, which is about 20 km long, they sometimes face dangerous animals such as lions and elephants…

Kenya: Risky Road to School (Learning World S4E9 3/3) (by WISEQatar)

In the Philippines, returning to school following Typhoon Haiyan (by UNICEF)

“I am happy to be back to school because my classmates survived,” says Alexa, 8.

In areas of the Philippines affected by the typhoon, about 90 per cent of school buildings were damaged – more than 3,200 schools in all – leaving over a million pupils and 34,000 teachers with no place for learning. In Leyte province alone, 760 schools were damaged. The Philippine Government, with the support of UNICEF and other partners, has worked to get children back to a normal schedule as quickly as possible, first with a ‘soft’ opening of schools in December, to be followed by a full reopening in January.

Read more here: UNICEF | Back on Track

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?

Where are the 57 Million Out-of-School Children?

Escuela Nueva’s flexible program encourages dropout students to come back to school to study at their own pace and to take exams when they are ready.
“If a student learns faster, I can guide him and he can go even faster; and if a student has difficulties or has been away for a long while, he can be supported,” said Ms. Mazzo. “If a student is away due to illness or farmer parents who move around, when he comes back to school, he can follow his learning guides where he left off — so students are motivated, self-esteem stays high, and they never repeat grades.” (via Children Thrive in Rural Colombia’s Flexible Schools - NYTimes.com)

Escuela Nueva’s flexible program encourages dropout students to come back to school to study at their own pace and to take exams when they are ready.

“If a student learns faster, I can guide him and he can go even faster; and if a student has difficulties or has been away for a long while, he can be supported,” said Ms. Mazzo. “If a student is away due to illness or farmer parents who move around, when he comes back to school, he can follow his learning guides where he left off — so students are motivated, self-esteem stays high, and they never repeat grades.” (via Children Thrive in Rural Colombia’s Flexible Schools - NYTimes.com)