Posts tagged teacher development

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers
Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.
The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.
(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers

Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.

The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.

(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Namibia: Many Teachers Still Unqualified

The Education Management Information System (EMIS) statistics for 2012 indicate that Namibia has about 24 660 teachers of whom 1 208 are without teacher training and about 3 000 are underqualified.

[…]

"This is a concern to all. Namibia needs more teachers. Namibia needs better teachers. And Namibia needs teachers who optimally deliver at all times. The quality of an education system cannot exceed the quality of its teachers," Namwandi stressed.

[…]

In an attempt to rectify the dire situation, UNESCO developed a Teachers Strategy 2012-2015’ that focuses on developing capacity for training and building a high-quality teaching force in those countries most hampered by the lack of teachers, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.

South Africa: Teaching the Teachers

The establishment of more specialist universities and education campuses for teacher training could see South Africa substantially increasing the quality and quantity of new teachers entering the profession.

[…]

A recent report from the National Education Evaluation and Development Unit (NEEDU, which forms part of the Department of Basic Education), was previously presented to the Committee, stating that there were substantial challenges with the quality of teachers and that for this reason it was desirable to develop a new qualification policy for teacher education.

UNICEF gears up to help over 500,000 Malian children return to school

BAMAKO/DAKAR, 3 September 2013 – With the new school year in Mali starting on the 1st of October, UNICEF is scaling up efforts to give a school place to half a million children whose lives were disrupted by the conflict, seasonal flooding and nutrition crisis.

Under the leadership of the Malian government and in collaboration with partners, UNICEF is mobilising teachers and parents to get children back to school and give them an improved education.

Across Mali, about 9,000 teachers will receive training throughout the 2013–2014 academic year. In addition, temporary learning spaces will be set up and minor repairs undertaken while damaged schools are rehabilitated. About 15,000 of the pupils will listen to lessons at new desks as part of the refurbishment efforts.

Massive campaign to get one million Somali children into school to be launched  (by unicef)

The campaign, led by the education authorities and supported by UNICEF and other international partners, will run for three years. It aims to give a quarter of the young people currently out of the education system a chance to learn.

Enrolment rates in Somalia are among the lowest in the world. Only four out of every ten children are in school. Many children start primary school much later than the recommended school-entry age of six and many more drop out early. Secondary school education enrolments are even weaker. Girls are particularly badly affected with only a third of girls enrolled in school in South Central Somalia and many dropping out before completing their primary education.

(via UNICEF, Back on Track)

Syrian volunteer teachers – men and women, old and young – participate in a teacher training session to learn how to work best with their pupils in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees.
[…] There are approximately 1,500 Syrian teachers working in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees. Some left their country two years ago; others have been here for just a few months. All of them say the same thing: No matter how difficult the situation we are in, teaching and helping children keeps us on our feet.
(via In Turkey, teachers learn how to work better with their Syrian refugee pupils | Back on Track)

Syrian volunteer teachers – men and women, old and young – participate in a teacher training session to learn how to work best with their pupils in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees.

[…] There are approximately 1,500 Syrian teachers working in Turkey’s camps for Syrian refugees. Some left their country two years ago; others have been here for just a few months. All of them say the same thing: No matter how difficult the situation we are in, teaching and helping children keeps us on our feet.

(via In Turkey, teachers learn how to work better with their Syrian refugee pupils | Back on Track)

[UNITED STATES] The number of alternative programs nationwide has skyrocketed, rising from 70 programs in the 2000-2001 school year to 658 in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Education, and these programs now make up 31 percent of all teacher preparation programs in the nation. Yet experts on teacher preparation acknowledge that little is known about which strategies actually work best for developing high-quality teachers. (via Alternative routes to teaching become more popular despite lack of evidence | Hechinger Report)

[UNITED STATES] The number of alternative programs nationwide has skyrocketed, rising from 70 programs in the 2000-2001 school year to 658 in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Education, and these programs now make up 31 percent of all teacher preparation programs in the nation. Yet experts on teacher preparation acknowledge that little is known about which strategies actually work best for developing high-quality teachers. (via Alternative routes to teaching become more popular despite lack of evidence | Hechinger Report)

Worldwide, 250 million primary school age children are not learning the basics – even though almost half of them are in school. Studies in several countries have shown that many children spend two or three years in school without learning to read a single word. That is why the 2013-14 EFA Global Monitoring Report will focus on recruiting and training effective teachers, who are vital to overcoming the learning gap and providing equitable education for all.
(via Every child needs a good teacher, especially in the early grades | World Education Blog)
Also see here.

Worldwide, 250 million primary school age children are not learning the basics – even though almost half of them are in school. Studies in several countries have shown that many children spend two or three years in school without learning to read a single word. That is why the 2013-14 EFA Global Monitoring Report will focus on recruiting and training effective teachers, who are vital to overcoming the learning gap and providing equitable education for all.

(via Every child needs a good teacher, especially in the early grades | World Education Blog)

Also see here.

U.S.: Low Standards for Teacher Training
The U.S. public education system is trying any number of techniques—from charter schools to presidential initiatives to oil-company-run teacher academies—to catch up to countries like Finland and South Korea in math and science education. But policymakers seem to be overlooking one simple solution: requiring math and science teachers to progress further up the educational ladder before they teach those subjects to kids.
(via U.S. science teachers are behind in training, degree requirements. - Slate Magazine)

U.S.: Low Standards for Teacher Training

The U.S. public education system is trying any number of techniques—from charter schools to presidential initiatives to oil-company-run teacher academies—to catch up to countries like Finland and South Korea in math and science education. But policymakers seem to be overlooking one simple solution: requiring math and science teachers to progress further up the educational ladder before they teach those subjects to kids.

(via U.S. science teachers are behind in training, degree requirements. - Slate Magazine)

[Abu Dhabi] State school teachers in the capital will be tested in English, maths and science to ensure their readiness for the next phase of the New School Model roll-out.

The Abu Dhabi Education Council (Adec) will extend its revised state school system to Grade 6 next year.

Before then, English, maths and science teachers for Grades 6 to 9 will have to take a Cambridge Placement Test to ascertain their readiness to teach a bilingual education model.

The online test assesses listening, reading and language knowledge skills and is based on the Common European Framework of
Reference for Languages. Based on the results, teachers will be referred for training to prepare them for the new standards and curriculum that will be adopted next year.