Posts tagged teacher education

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers
Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.
The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.
(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers

Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.

The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.

(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Namibia: Many Teachers Still Unqualified

The Education Management Information System (EMIS) statistics for 2012 indicate that Namibia has about 24 660 teachers of whom 1 208 are without teacher training and about 3 000 are underqualified.

[…]

"This is a concern to all. Namibia needs more teachers. Namibia needs better teachers. And Namibia needs teachers who optimally deliver at all times. The quality of an education system cannot exceed the quality of its teachers," Namwandi stressed.

[…]

In an attempt to rectify the dire situation, UNESCO developed a Teachers Strategy 2012-2015’ that focuses on developing capacity for training and building a high-quality teaching force in those countries most hampered by the lack of teachers, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.

South Africa: Teaching the Teachers

The establishment of more specialist universities and education campuses for teacher training could see South Africa substantially increasing the quality and quantity of new teachers entering the profession.

[…]

A recent report from the National Education Evaluation and Development Unit (NEEDU, which forms part of the Department of Basic Education), was previously presented to the Committee, stating that there were substantial challenges with the quality of teachers and that for this reason it was desirable to develop a new qualification policy for teacher education.

Today is World Teachers’ Day
“A Call for Teachers!” is the slogan of World Teachers’ Day 2013 (5 October), which UNESCO is celebrating along with its partners, the International Labour Organization (ILO), UNDP, UNICEF and Education International (EI).
Since teachers are the most powerful force for equity, access and quality education, a call for teachers means calling for quality education for all.
Why a call for teachers? Because there is a huge shortage of professional, well-trained and well-supported teachers to achieve better quality education. The challenge of recruiting teachers does not lie just in the numbers, but in the provision of quality teachers. Far too often teachers remain under-qualified, poorly paid and with low status.
(via World-teachersday-2013 | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization)
To download theTeacher Shortage infographic, click here.

Today is World Teachers’ Day

“A Call for Teachers!” is the slogan of World Teachers’ Day 2013 (5 October), which UNESCO is celebrating along with its partners, the International Labour Organization (ILO), UNDP, UNICEF and Education International (EI).

Since teachers are the most powerful force for equity, access and quality education, a call for teachers means calling for quality education for all.

Why a call for teachers? Because there is a huge shortage of professional, well-trained and well-supported teachers to achieve better quality education. The challenge of recruiting teachers does not lie just in the numbers, but in the provision of quality teachers. Far too often teachers remain under-qualified, poorly paid and with low status.

(via World-teachersday-2013 | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization)

To download theTeacher Shortage infographic, click here.

Education takes a hit in Myanmar’s Kachin State

“The biggest problem is we need more teachers. However, many who are qualified are afraid to work in the area because of the ongoing conflict and the recent attacks,” Haundang said.

Some 47,000 people are in IDP camps in KIA-controlled areas, with thousands more staying with host families, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported on 18 April.

Thousands of school-age children have been affected by the conflict, with varying access to education facilities.

In KIA-controlled areas, volunteer teachers have been used to maintain education services for the displaced. However, financial support for this effort is lacking. A comprehensive assessment of the education sector is urgently needed to better determine the number of children in need of education support, gaps in school supplies, and the absorption capacity of existing schools, OCHA said.

[ENGLAND] Fewer students are applying to become teachers since the government began to reduce bursaries for those with 2:2 degrees and turn away applicants with thirds.

Applications to teacher training courses are down by 15% on last year, after the number of bursaries was also cut back for those applying to teach non-priority subjects.

But research shows more students want to join the profession. Over 80% of final-year students think teaching is a high-status career choice, according to research released today by the Teaching Agency, while a separate survey shows schools and universities are the second most popular type of employer

[INDIA] The National council of teacher education (NCTE) has taken an initiative to reform and revamp teaching education system in the country. Following the implementation of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education-2009, the government is now gearing up to reform the teaching education system with an aim to improve the quality of procedures and practices. Following the exercise, all courses of teacher education like BEd, MEd, NTT (Nursery Teachers Training), BPEd and MPEd will get revised.

On the Shoulders of Giants: What Does Bank Street College Know About Preparing Teachers? (VIDEO!)

Ariel Sacks writes about Bank Street College, a teacher education program in New York that “has a unique approach that gets it right for teachers and students.”

Also see: Edutopia’s story and video on Bank Street College.

[ENGLAND] Trainee teachers face sitting tough new tests in literacy and numeracy before being allowed to enter the classroom amid fears over poor standards in the three-Rs, it emerged today.
Students will be required to sit rigorous exams to qualify for training places as part of sweeping Government reforms designed to attract the brightest graduates into the profession.
An expert panel – led by top head teachers – will be tasked with drawing up new-style assessments of basic skills in a move designed to root out poorly-qualified candidates.
Ministers are also proposing to raise the pass mark for existing tests and clamp down on the number of times students can re-sit exams. (via Teachers to sit rigorous new tests in the three-Rs - Telegraph)

[ENGLAND] Trainee teachers face sitting tough new tests in literacy and numeracy before being allowed to enter the classroom amid fears over poor standards in the three-Rs, it emerged today.

Students will be required to sit rigorous exams to qualify for training places as part of sweeping Government reforms designed to attract the brightest graduates into the profession.

An expert panel – led by top head teachers – will be tasked with drawing up new-style assessments of basic skills in a move designed to root out poorly-qualified candidates.

Ministers are also proposing to raise the pass mark for existing tests and clamp down on the number of times students can re-sit exams. (via Teachers to sit rigorous new tests in the three-Rs - Telegraph)

Teacher training in Ontario will be bumped up to two years starting in 2014, says the provincial government.

The Liberals, who promised the move during the 2011 election campaign, began consultations with education groups on Wednesday about the change.

Three to four additional sessions are planned for April and May.

Teachers typically earn a four-year undergraduate degree and then spend another year at university completing their bachelor of education. (Ten of the 13 universities with education programs also offer the degrees concurrently so students can complete the two at the same time.)

The Liberals have said more training is needed given the challenges and increasing demands teachers face. The expanded program, the details of which have yet to be finalized, will include more practical, in-class training for new teachers.