Posts tagged teachers

Promises have been made, and broken, about every child’s right to primary education by 2015. Yet, just months away from the deadline, a new policy paper released on World Teachers’ Day by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the EFA Global Monitoring Report shows that the global demand for teachers will soar from 4 million in 2015 to 27 million by 2030. This demand for new teachers is both to keep up with growing school populations and to make up for teachers who are leaving the profession each year. In the race to fill these gaps, many countries are throwing learning into question by hiring teachers with little or no training.
(via Wanted: Trained Teachers to Ensure Every Child’s Right to Education | Global Partnership for Education)

Promises have been made, and broken, about every child’s right to primary education by 2015. Yet, just months away from the deadline, a new policy paper released on World Teachers’ Day by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the EFA Global Monitoring Report shows that the global demand for teachers will soar from 4 million in 2015 to 27 million by 2030. This demand for new teachers is both to keep up with growing school populations and to make up for teachers who are leaving the profession each year. In the race to fill these gaps, many countries are throwing learning into question by hiring teachers with little or no training.

(via Wanted: Trained Teachers to Ensure Every Child’s Right to Education | Global Partnership for Education)

via Global Partnership for Education

Teachers unite!

In the past two weeks, our Unite for Quality Education campaign culminated in events across the globe: From Buenos Aires to Sidney, Delhi, Brussels, Pretoria, and New York, education leaders, teachers and students from five continents have pushed quality education to the top of the development agenda.

With our round-the-world voyage we celebrated the conclusion of the year-long campaign, which brought awareness to the issues concerning teachers that we must continue to tackle as the global development agenda prepares to move beyond 2015.

Canada Helping Children in Remote Regions of Kenya Access Quality Education

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August 21, 2014: Canada’s support to UNICEF will help provide more children with specialized teachers, safe schools, and more effective delivery of education in remote communities.

The project aims to increase the number of children, especially girls, attending school in Garissa and Turkana counties, two remote and arid regions of Kenya with high poverty rates, recurrent droughts, and large refugee populations. In these counties, access to governmental services is low, especially for nomadic communities. The project also aims to improve children’s education through activities that include training teachers, renovating classrooms, setting up mobile schools and upgrading the national curriculum.

Source: ReliefWeb

Singapore has one of the best educational systems in the world, according to international assessments, and its teacher training program has been cited as one reason why. As the country increases the use of digital devices in schools, it’s making a parallel effort to train teachers not just in the latest tech trends – like how to work a SmartBoard or what app to use to practice fractions – but in how to determine when and why to use technology.
But the broader goal of the Classroom of the Future is to get Singapore’s future teaching force and visitors to consider how new technologies could change education. Could 4D –where actual sounds and smells join with 3D models – increase student learning? What are new ways for students to share information and ideas? Would video conferencing with foreign peers make students more globally conscious?
(via In Singapore, training teachers for the ‘Classroom of the Future’ | Hechinger Report)

Singapore has one of the best educational systems in the world, according to international assessments, and its teacher training program has been cited as one reason why. As the country increases the use of digital devices in schools, it’s making a parallel effort to train teachers not just in the latest tech trends – like how to work a SmartBoard or what app to use to practice fractions – but in how to determine when and why to use technology.

But the broader goal of the Classroom of the Future is to get Singapore’s future teaching force and visitors to consider how new technologies could change education. Could 4D –where actual sounds and smells join with 3D models – increase student learning? What are new ways for students to share information and ideas? Would video conferencing with foreign peers make students more globally conscious?

(via In Singapore, training teachers for the ‘Classroom of the Future’ | Hechinger Report)

In the Netherlands … 15-year-olds score higher than the OECD average in reading, mathematics and science literacy. So how does one country achieve such good results? Cees, who teaches in a secondary school in Amsterdam, says: “I find it difficult to answer why the Netherlands is doing so well, because what do grades mean? To which countries do you compare?
But there are several clues to the Netherlands’ high performance in his answers he gave to our questions about how he does his job. They reflect many of the strategies to provide the best teachers that we outline in latest EFA Global Monitoring Report, Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all, including getting enough teachers into school; training teachers to meet the needs of all children; including the disadvantaged; providing teachers trainees with mentors; and providing ongoing teacher training and professional development. (via Student-focused learning helps the Netherlands achieve | World Education Blog)

In the Netherlands … 15-year-olds score higher than the OECD average in reading, mathematics and science literacy. So how does one country achieve such good results? Cees, who teaches in a secondary school in Amsterdam, says: “I find it difficult to answer why the Netherlands is doing so well, because what do grades mean? To which countries do you compare?

But there are several clues to the Netherlands’ high performance in his answers he gave to our questions about how he does his job. They reflect many of the strategies to provide the best teachers that we outline in latest EFA Global Monitoring Report, Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all, including getting enough teachers into school; training teachers to meet the needs of all children; including the disadvantaged; providing teachers trainees with mentors; and providing ongoing teacher training and professional development. (via Student-focused learning helps the Netherlands achieve | World Education Blog)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.
It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

AMMAN, Jordan, April 24 (UNHCR) In a suburb of Amman, surrounded by piles of garbage and stray sheep, Jamal and his cousin Akram teach the Arabic alphabet to a small group of Syrian refugee children. The classroom is a small orange tent where the young pupils sit on the ground with their text books on their laps. A whiteboard dangles from a wall of the tent.

It’s very simple, but effective. In a country where about half of the school-aged Syrian refugee children are unable to attend public schools, the residents of an informal camp in the Jordanian capital’s Kherbet Al-Souk district have taken matters into their own hands. (via UNHCR - Syrians get round education crunch by running their own school in Jordan)

Over 40 percent of India’s children drop out of school before finishing 8th grade, despite a recent law designed to provide free and compulsory elementary education for all.
Most students who quit school are from the lowest rungs of Indian society. A new Human Rights Watch report, “They Say We’re Dirty,” shows that discrimination by teachers and school officials fail to provide a welcoming and child-friendly school environment for these children.
(via Q&A: Talking Discrimination and School Dropout Rates in India | Human Rights Watch)

Over 40 percent of India’s children drop out of school before finishing 8th grade, despite a recent law designed to provide free and compulsory elementary education for all.

Most students who quit school are from the lowest rungs of Indian society. A new Human Rights Watch report, “They Say We’re Dirty,” shows that discrimination by teachers and school officials fail to provide a welcoming and child-friendly school environment for these children.

(via Q&A: Talking Discrimination and School Dropout Rates in India | Human Rights Watch)

Classroom heroes: Amid violence, teachers committed to children’s learning (by UNICEF)

"We, the teachers, we try to make the violence disappear," says Nguinissara Rita, a primary school teacher in a site for internally displaced people in Bangui. Some 2.3 million children have been affected by the ongoing crisis in the Central African Republic, and for almost two years schooling has been disrupted. Through temporary learning spaces set up by UNICEF and partners, more than 20,000 children are now able to attend classes.

Read more.

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’
Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.
School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.
The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.
At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.
Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.
[…]
ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.
"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."
Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.
(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

UK: Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’

Teachers should scrutinise the holiday plans of families from communities that practise female genital mutilation (FGM), a conference has heard.

School staff should also watch for signs of FGM, such as frequent toilet trips and girls in pain.

The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) says teachers need more training to help them identity and protect girls at risk.

At least 66,000 girls and women in the UK are believed to be victims of FGM.

Campaigners say girls are most at risk of undergoing the procedure during the long summer holidays.

[…]

ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said: “Teachers have been put in a position of great responsibility. What they need now is clear guidance on how to fulfil those responsibilities.

"They need a clear system for reporting their concerns."

Dr Bousted welcomed the letter that Education Secretary Michael Gove sent to schools last term, urging them to protect girls at risk from what he described as “this very serious form of child abuse”.

(via BBC News - Teachers ‘should check holiday plans for FGM clues’)

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)