Posts tagged teaching

Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines.

[…] in war zones around the world, students, teachers, and schools are regularly targeted for attack. Last year alone, armed forces and groups attacked students, teachers, or schools in at least 21 other countries in the midst of armed conflict, endangering children’s lives, educations, and futures.

Such attacks are not a matter of collateral damage; they are part of deliberate, despicable strategies.

(via Teaching can get you killed at schools on the front lines | Human Rights Watch)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.
The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.
(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

A church school in India for young ethnic Chin migrants from northwestern Myanmar is training a new generation of missionaries, who will return to their mountainous homeland across the border to make education more accessible, especially in remote rural areas.

The Chins are Myanmar’s poorest population: the United Nations says at least 73 percent of the estimated 500,000 largely Christian group live below the poverty line. Like other minorities, the Chin fled years of poverty and military rule to Mizoram, where approximately 100,000 now live.

(via IRIN Asia | Teacher training offers hope for Myanmar’s rural education | Myanmar | Education | Migration | Refugees/IDPs)

Escuela Nueva’s flexible program encourages dropout students to come back to school to study at their own pace and to take exams when they are ready.
“If a student learns faster, I can guide him and he can go even faster; and if a student has difficulties or has been away for a long while, he can be supported,” said Ms. Mazzo. “If a student is away due to illness or farmer parents who move around, when he comes back to school, he can follow his learning guides where he left off — so students are motivated, self-esteem stays high, and they never repeat grades.” (via Children Thrive in Rural Colombia’s Flexible Schools - NYTimes.com)

Escuela Nueva’s flexible program encourages dropout students to come back to school to study at their own pace and to take exams when they are ready.

“If a student learns faster, I can guide him and he can go even faster; and if a student has difficulties or has been away for a long while, he can be supported,” said Ms. Mazzo. “If a student is away due to illness or farmer parents who move around, when he comes back to school, he can follow his learning guides where he left off — so students are motivated, self-esteem stays high, and they never repeat grades.” (via Children Thrive in Rural Colombia’s Flexible Schools - NYTimes.com)

Dear Teachers: Stand tall – not for ourselves, but for others

[Cebu, Philippines] Excerpts from Education Secretary Armin Luistro’s message to teachers in the Philippines:

image[Image credit: UNICEF]

This is a crucial time for us. It is during times like this when you are most needed. It is important that you recognize your leadership role. The leader has to stand strong. Without a leader, chaos just spontaneously erupts.

[…]

Let’s look for people first. Don’t worry about damages to property – we will deal with that later. The worst thing is to count buildings and fallen trees and not account for our people.

Second, let’s bring our children back to school. The best way for kids to recover is to bring them back to their routine as soon as possible – and that is to bring them to school. There is no need to conduct classes right away. Let them play. Do activities.

The Department of Education must be the spokesperson for children. Bring them back to school; then we will start accounting for them. Let’s see who are not present and who cannot be contacted: sick, missing.

In times of crisis, we account for the lost sheep. This is what the leader should do: to leave the 99 and look for the lost sheep.

Read the original here.

More info on the impact of Typhoon Haiyan on children and education:

An estimated 2.8 million preschool and school aged children may have been driven from their homes. In the hardest hit area of Region 8: Eastern Visayas, more than 3,000 schools and 2,400 day care centres appear to be affected (via UNICEF)

Also see here.

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers
Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.
The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.
(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Learning in Rural China: The Challenges for Teachers

Mr. Huang became principal of Qiao Tou Lian He school at the age of 25, not because he was specifically trained for the post, but because he had been the only educated person in his village. He’s a dynamic leader who is squarely focused on supporting, developing and evaluating his teachers, of whom only a handful have a high school degree and more than basic teacher training.

The teaching conditions in the rural Qiao Tou Lian He school, 3,000 kilometres southwest of Shanghai, are tough and teachers are struggling […] The Qiao Tou Lian He school is mainly on its own; but the teachers I met there showed an amazing commitment, and I was struck by the positive learning atmosphere – rigorous, highly disciplined, yet joyful – in every classroom I visited.

(via OECD educationtoday: Learning in rural China: The challenges for teachers)

Bangladesh Schools Battle Water-logging
Students and teachers in southwestern Bangladesh, where chronic flooding known as water-logging closes schools annually, are forced to find creative ways to carry on learning, citizens and experts say.Interruptions to a child’s education due to emergencies can have serious implications, say experts, who point to the impact of gaps in schooling and the long-term dangers of schools that are decaying from water damage.While improvising through disaster has helped, more is needed to keep schools functioning, say experts.
(via IRIN Asia | Bangladesh schools battle water-logging | Bangladesh | Education | Natural Disasters | Water & Sanitation)

Bangladesh Schools Battle Water-logging

Students and teachers in southwestern Bangladesh, where chronic flooding known as water-logging closes schools annually, are forced to find creative ways to carry on learning, citizens and experts say.

Interruptions to a child’s education due to emergencies can have serious implications, say experts, who point to the impact of gaps in schooling and the long-term dangers of schools that are decaying from water damage.

While improvising through disaster has helped, more is needed to keep schools functioning, say experts.

(via IRIN Asia | Bangladesh schools battle water-logging | Bangladesh | Education | Natural Disasters | Water & Sanitation)




Perspectives of Irreplaceable Teachers
This paper focuses on what our respondents told us about three broad topics that have clear policy ramifications: What does effective (and ineffective) teaching look like? How do the best teachers become so effective? And what do great teachers think about their profession? Several themes emerged. 

Perspectives of Irreplaceable Teachers

This paper focuses on what our respondents told us about three broad topics that have clear policy ramifications: What does effective (and ineffective) teaching look like? How do the best teachers become so effective? And what do great teachers think about their profession? Several themes emerged. 

[Manitoba, Canada] Yet I’ve stuck it out. I’ve stayed in the classroom. I am beginning to see now that this is where I am meant to be. I am still interested in the big picture of education; in technology, possibility, social justice and empowerment. Probably more so than in the past. This school year coming up will be my twentieth year of teaching. I still feel that I have much to learn and many things to explore. Teaching can be awful. It can be stressful and alienating and overwhelming. It is often lonely as you struggle to keep kids alive and safe. But it is also a beautiful, very human profession where we help kids to learn who they are and help them to build a better life and a better world. It is a profession that is future oriented and focused on potential.
A joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training has welcomed the plan by the Department of Basic Education to incrementally implement the use of African languages in all South African schools.
According to the Department of Basic Education, the programme will be implemented as from 2014 for Grade R and Grade 1. This will incrementally increase to include Grade 12 by 2025. The language selection for First Additional Language (FAL) would be Xitsonga, any Nguni language, a Sotho language, Tshivenda or Afrikaans. (via Parliament welcomes use of African languages in all schools (English))

A joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training has welcomed the plan by the Department of Basic Education to incrementally implement the use of African languages in all South African schools.

According to the Department of Basic Education, the programme will be implemented as from 2014 for Grade R and Grade 1. This will incrementally increase to include Grade 12 by 2025. The language selection for First Additional Language (FAL) would be Xitsonga, any Nguni language, a Sotho language, Tshivenda or Afrikaans. (via Parliament welcomes use of African languages in all schools (English))

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.
The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)

The supply of teachers is failing to keep pace with the demand for primary education. According to the latest UIS data, the world needs to create 1.7 million new teaching posts by 2015 to reach Universal Primary Education (UPE). In addition, 5.1 million teachers are expected to leave the profession and must be replaced. In total, 6.8 million teachers will be needed to ensure every child’s right to basic education.

The UIS has created an interactive info-graphic to illustrate the gap between the supply and demand for teachers by region. The situation is most extreme in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-aged population continues to rise. More than 1.8 million primary school teachers are required by 2015. In other words, the supply of teachers in the region must increase by 10% every year to meet the goal of UPE. (via Global Action Week 2013)