Posts tagged teaching

unicef:

Mali: School of Hope
It’s been almost 10 years since teachers searched the streets of Bamako, Mali for hearing-impaired children, 19 of whom would be their first pupils. Today, the School of Hope is ensuring that its 160 pupils have an education – and a role at the centre of their families.

It is estimated that 90 per cent of the pupils at the School of Hope are survivors of meningitis – an inflammation of the protective membranes of the spine and brain.

In 2011, UNICEF reached nearly 11 million Malians under the age of 29 through an aggressive meningitis vaccination campaign.

Like all children, those with disabilities have many abilities, but are often excluded from society by discrimination and lack of support, leaving them among the most invisible and vulnerable children in the world.

On 30 May, UNICEF launched its flagship report The State of the World’s Children 2013: Children with Disabilities. The report brings global attention to the urgent needs of a largely invisible population.

Read more: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/mali_69546.html

Getting Mauritania’s refugee children back into school (by unicef)

Also see here.

My Spanish students write their own plays to improve their English vocab | Teacher Network | Guardian Professional

Role play and interactive technology helped primary teacher Jeremy Dean increase his foreign students’ English vocabulary at a language immersion school in Spain

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.
The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

[CHINA] New Ministry of Education regulations are designed lessen the load on Chinese students.

The new regulation, which the Beijing Times has dubbed “the strictest rule of its kind in China,” covers a range of areas of study and will take effect on March 19. Under the regulation, primary schools should cancel midterm exams, limit homework and both primary and high schools are forbidden from issuing exam rankings. It also forbids schools, teaching research institutes and private tutoring organizations from organizing “make-up” classes outside of the regular school curriculum. Teachers in public schools can’t charge fees for after-school classes, and can’t persuade their students to attend training classes for their other subjects, according to the People’s Daily. (via The homework that never ends - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn)

[Abu Dhabi] State school teachers in the capital will be tested in English, maths and science to ensure their readiness for the next phase of the New School Model roll-out.

The Abu Dhabi Education Council (Adec) will extend its revised state school system to Grade 6 next year.

Before then, English, maths and science teachers for Grades 6 to 9 will have to take a Cambridge Placement Test to ascertain their readiness to teach a bilingual education model.

The online test assesses listening, reading and language knowledge skills and is based on the Common European Framework of
Reference for Languages. Based on the results, teachers will be referred for training to prepare them for the new standards and curriculum that will be adopted next year.

Edmonton School Board to Offer Yoga Courses

“The program is designed to allow students to experience the benefits of increased flexibility, strength, focus and concentration,” the course description says. “Students will learn to be non-judgmental about their own and others’ yoga practice. Through continued practice, students will relieve stress, learn to relax and experience the health benefits of yoga practice.”

Pakistan risks missing ‘primary education for all’ target – The Express Tribune

LAHORE: With Pakistan spending only 2.3% of its GDP on education, the country is unlikely to achieve its target of ‘Universal Primary Education for All’ by 2015, states the 2012 Education for All (EFA) Global Monitoring Report.

The 10th EFA report titled ‘Putting Education to Work’ is expected to be released globally today (Tuesday). It maintains that despite having committed itself to the particular United Nations Millennium Development Goal, Pakistan still has the second largest number of out of school children: around 5.1 million.

Lessons from Abroad: French president proposes homework ban

lessonsfromabroad:

French President Francois Hollande has a new plan to fix economic inequality problems in his country: ban homework.

The move, designed to level the playing field between students who get help from their families at home and those who don’t, is just one piece of reforms proposed by Hollande.