Posts tagged technology

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.
[…]
The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.
Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

The Finnish company that created Angry Birds is marketing an early childhood curriculum around the world that is meant to make learning more fun.

[…]

The program is based on the Finnish national curriculum for children ages 3 to 6, which is largely based on free play and physical exercise. It builds in more technological tools, a reconfigured learning environment — and some of the popular Angry Birds characters — to maximize learning through engagement. The company also has worked music and games into the program and is partnering with publishers to create activity books and other learning materials.

Rovio is now training some teachers in China to use the new curriculum, and the company hopes to expand its reach in all directions. (via ‘Angry Birds’ creator develops preschool program to promote learning through fun - The Washington Post)

Singapore has one of the best educational systems in the world, according to international assessments, and its teacher training program has been cited as one reason why. As the country increases the use of digital devices in schools, it’s making a parallel effort to train teachers not just in the latest tech trends – like how to work a SmartBoard or what app to use to practice fractions – but in how to determine when and why to use technology.
But the broader goal of the Classroom of the Future is to get Singapore’s future teaching force and visitors to consider how new technologies could change education. Could 4D –where actual sounds and smells join with 3D models – increase student learning? What are new ways for students to share information and ideas? Would video conferencing with foreign peers make students more globally conscious?
(via In Singapore, training teachers for the ‘Classroom of the Future’ | Hechinger Report)

Singapore has one of the best educational systems in the world, according to international assessments, and its teacher training program has been cited as one reason why. As the country increases the use of digital devices in schools, it’s making a parallel effort to train teachers not just in the latest tech trends – like how to work a SmartBoard or what app to use to practice fractions – but in how to determine when and why to use technology.

But the broader goal of the Classroom of the Future is to get Singapore’s future teaching force and visitors to consider how new technologies could change education. Could 4D –where actual sounds and smells join with 3D models – increase student learning? What are new ways for students to share information and ideas? Would video conferencing with foreign peers make students more globally conscious?

(via In Singapore, training teachers for the ‘Classroom of the Future’ | Hechinger Report)

Bangladesh: Innovative Floating School Improves Access to Education
The floating school works in the remote river basin where access to education is hard, particularly during the monsoon season. From late June to October one third of the country goes underwater, making access to basic services very difficult. “It is the main reason for school drop outs in rural Bangladesh” Mosammat said. Were it not for innovative inventions such as this floating school, many of these children would find accessing education impossible.
The school collects children from their homes, teaches them on board and returns them at the end of the session. Mosammat describes the boat’s architect’s philosophy as ”if the children couldn’t come to school, then the school should come to them”.
(via Bangladesh: Innovative solutions to improve education for the disadvantaged | World Education Blog)

Bangladesh: Innovative Floating School Improves Access to Education

The floating school works in the remote river basin where access to education is hard, particularly during the monsoon season. From late June to October one third of the country goes underwater, making access to basic services very difficult. “It is the main reason for school drop outs in rural Bangladesh” Mosammat said. Were it not for innovative inventions such as this floating school, many of these children would find accessing education impossible.

The school collects children from their homes, teaches them on board and returns them at the end of the session. Mosammat describes the boat’s architect’s philosophy as ”if the children couldn’t come to school, then the school should come to them”.

(via Bangladesh: Innovative solutions to improve education for the disadvantaged | World Education Blog)

Can an iPad Game Teach You About Slavery?
A lone woman flees into the woods, clinging tightly to a crying baby. She needs to put the child down in order to clear a path, but when she does a shadowy creature slowly make its way toward the baby — if she’s too slow she’ll lose the child to the shadows. That woman is Isaura, a fictional African slave in Brazil during the 1700s, and the protagonist of Thralled, an in-development game for iPad. “Slavery, as a legacy and an institution, is a topic that needs discussing,” says lead designer Miguel Oliveira. “And we want to bring it up to discussion.”
"We have the potential to involve people in the subject and create a sense of empathy that can only be achieved with direct involvement," he says. "With Thralled, we want to try to encourage empathy for victimized people and thus heighten sensibility for others’ suffering … interactive media has the potential to change people, and yet this potential is mostly left unexplored. We want to make an effort in the way of exploring it." So far during testing, which has included a few students, these efforts have proved largely successful. "People have had strong emotional reactions, which makes me think that Thralled has the potential of teaching and getting people interested about this and related topics."
(via Can an iPad game teach you about slavery? | The Verge)

Can an iPad Game Teach You About Slavery?

A lone woman flees into the woods, clinging tightly to a crying baby. She needs to put the child down in order to clear a path, but when she does a shadowy creature slowly make its way toward the baby — if she’s too slow she’ll lose the child to the shadows. That woman is Isaura, a fictional African slave in Brazil during the 1700s, and the protagonist of Thralled, an in-development game for iPad. “Slavery, as a legacy and an institution, is a topic that needs discussing,” says lead designer Miguel Oliveira. “And we want to bring it up to discussion.”

"We have the potential to involve people in the subject and create a sense of empathy that can only be achieved with direct involvement," he says. "With Thralled, we want to try to encourage empathy for victimized people and thus heighten sensibility for others’ suffering … interactive media has the potential to change people, and yet this potential is mostly left unexplored. We want to make an effort in the way of exploring it." So far during testing, which has included a few students, these efforts have proved largely successful. "People have had strong emotional reactions, which makes me think that Thralled has the potential of teaching and getting people interested about this and related topics."

(via Can an iPad game teach you about slavery? | The Verge)

Giant technology firm Intel Corp is committed to assisting the education sector in Thailand with the aim to encourage the country’s students to get the latest innovative technologies as learning tools.
The company continues to launch the future classroom pilot project to help encourage schools in Thailand to get technologies as learning tools, said Accharas Ouysinprasert, country manger of Intel Microelectronics (Thailand).
The future classroom model is an education solution tailored for one-to-one eLearning in classrooms around the world, beginning in December 2012. (via Intel remains committed to Thai education - The Nation)

Giant technology firm Intel Corp is committed to assisting the education sector in Thailand with the aim to encourage the country’s students to get the latest innovative technologies as learning tools.

The company continues to launch the future classroom pilot project to help encourage schools in Thailand to get technologies as learning tools, said Accharas Ouysinprasert, country manger of Intel Microelectronics (Thailand).

The future classroom model is an education solution tailored for one-to-one eLearning in classrooms around the world, beginning in December 2012. (via Intel remains committed to Thai education - The Nation)

[IRELAND] TEACHERS should not befriend their students on Facebook and other social networking sites, according to a new code of conduct agreed by the Teaching Council, the group that regulates the profession.


The new code is the first attempt to set down clear guidelines on use of social media for 70,000 primary and second-level teachers in the State. It comes amid growing concern in school communities about bullying of students and teachers on Facebook and Twitter.

[SHENYANG, CHINA] Educational authorities across the nation are embracing newly amended rules to prevent cheating on upcoming college entrance exams.
The Danish minister of education is quoted: “I am happy that we as the first country in the world had the vision to let students use the internet during their exams. The internet is an integrated part of students’ everyday lives and education so this development is natural. The experiment shows there is a range of positive effects.”
OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.
The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.
As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.

The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.

As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

Lessons from Abroad: One Laptop per Child initiative does not impact student performance

lessonsfromabroad:

One Laptop per Child, the American-based charity that distributes laptops to children in developing countries, failed to raise test scores in Peru, reports ZDnet.

According to an evaluation by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), students in Peru who had received the laptops did not do…