Posts tagged technology

Can an iPad Game Teach You About Slavery?
A lone woman flees into the woods, clinging tightly to a crying baby. She needs to put the child down in order to clear a path, but when she does a shadowy creature slowly make its way toward the baby — if she’s too slow she’ll lose the child to the shadows. That woman is Isaura, a fictional African slave in Brazil during the 1700s, and the protagonist of Thralled, an in-development game for iPad. “Slavery, as a legacy and an institution, is a topic that needs discussing,” says lead designer Miguel Oliveira. “And we want to bring it up to discussion.”
"We have the potential to involve people in the subject and create a sense of empathy that can only be achieved with direct involvement," he says. "With Thralled, we want to try to encourage empathy for victimized people and thus heighten sensibility for others’ suffering … interactive media has the potential to change people, and yet this potential is mostly left unexplored. We want to make an effort in the way of exploring it." So far during testing, which has included a few students, these efforts have proved largely successful. "People have had strong emotional reactions, which makes me think that Thralled has the potential of teaching and getting people interested about this and related topics."
(via Can an iPad game teach you about slavery? | The Verge)

Can an iPad Game Teach You About Slavery?

A lone woman flees into the woods, clinging tightly to a crying baby. She needs to put the child down in order to clear a path, but when she does a shadowy creature slowly make its way toward the baby — if she’s too slow she’ll lose the child to the shadows. That woman is Isaura, a fictional African slave in Brazil during the 1700s, and the protagonist of Thralled, an in-development game for iPad. “Slavery, as a legacy and an institution, is a topic that needs discussing,” says lead designer Miguel Oliveira. “And we want to bring it up to discussion.”

"We have the potential to involve people in the subject and create a sense of empathy that can only be achieved with direct involvement," he says. "With Thralled, we want to try to encourage empathy for victimized people and thus heighten sensibility for others’ suffering … interactive media has the potential to change people, and yet this potential is mostly left unexplored. We want to make an effort in the way of exploring it." So far during testing, which has included a few students, these efforts have proved largely successful. "People have had strong emotional reactions, which makes me think that Thralled has the potential of teaching and getting people interested about this and related topics."

(via Can an iPad game teach you about slavery? | The Verge)

Giant technology firm Intel Corp is committed to assisting the education sector in Thailand with the aim to encourage the country’s students to get the latest innovative technologies as learning tools.
The company continues to launch the future classroom pilot project to help encourage schools in Thailand to get technologies as learning tools, said Accharas Ouysinprasert, country manger of Intel Microelectronics (Thailand).
The future classroom model is an education solution tailored for one-to-one eLearning in classrooms around the world, beginning in December 2012. (via Intel remains committed to Thai education - The Nation)

Giant technology firm Intel Corp is committed to assisting the education sector in Thailand with the aim to encourage the country’s students to get the latest innovative technologies as learning tools.

The company continues to launch the future classroom pilot project to help encourage schools in Thailand to get technologies as learning tools, said Accharas Ouysinprasert, country manger of Intel Microelectronics (Thailand).

The future classroom model is an education solution tailored for one-to-one eLearning in classrooms around the world, beginning in December 2012. (via Intel remains committed to Thai education - The Nation)

[IRELAND] TEACHERS should not befriend their students on Facebook and other social networking sites, according to a new code of conduct agreed by the Teaching Council, the group that regulates the profession.


The new code is the first attempt to set down clear guidelines on use of social media for 70,000 primary and second-level teachers in the State. It comes amid growing concern in school communities about bullying of students and teachers on Facebook and Twitter.

[SHENYANG, CHINA] Educational authorities across the nation are embracing newly amended rules to prevent cheating on upcoming college entrance exams.
The Danish minister of education is quoted: “I am happy that we as the first country in the world had the vision to let students use the internet during their exams. The internet is an integrated part of students’ everyday lives and education so this development is natural. The experiment shows there is a range of positive effects.”
OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.
The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.
As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.

The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.

As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles. (via Teaching without distraction (with video))

Lessons from Abroad: One Laptop per Child initiative does not impact student performance

lessonsfromabroad:

One Laptop per Child, the American-based charity that distributes laptops to children in developing countries, failed to raise test scores in Peru, reports ZDnet.

According to an evaluation by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), students in Peru who had received the laptops did not do…

[AUSTRALIA] As companies debate the merits of allowing employees to bring their own smartphones and computers to work, another sector is forging ahead allowing a younger generation to do just that and more.

Some schools are not only allowing students to bring laptops and tablets to class in keeping with the trend known as BYO device or BYOD, they are also outsourcing technical support to the students themselves.

Hawker College in the ACT introduced BYOD for students last year. Principal Stephen Gwilliam says students who take up the option are responsible for their own technical support.

Education authorities in Australia rolled out on Friday an anti-bullying Web site that offers to children and parents fact on bullying and tips on how to deal with it.


The Bullying No Way! Portal features a choose-you-own adventure game that teaches student ways to deal with bullying and offers moderate for a where the kids could talk about their problems with fellow children. It could be found at www.bullyingnoway.gov.au.

While Canadian educators believe that digital technologies can enrich students’ learning, there are still significant challenges to overcome in making this happen – with one of the main barriers being students’ lack of digital literacy skills. And school filters and policies that ban or restrict networked devices in the classroom take away the very opportunities young people need to develop digital literacy skills such as good judgment and responsible use.


These are among the findings in Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Teachers’ Perspectives – a new report from Media Awareness Network (MNet).